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Biographical Record 



Livingston and Woodford Counties, 



LLINOIS. 



A people thai take no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors ii'ill never achieve 
anything ■n.'orthy to be remembered with pride by remote generations.'^ — Macauley. 



CHICAGO; 

The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 

1900. 



B57I 



PREFACK. 




^ZyilriL^ greaiest oi rviigiisn nistonans, imacaulay, ana one ot me moi 

>vi brilliant writers of the present century, has said : "The history of 

' country is best told in a record of the lives of its people." In cor 



-V^^ 






5;^^^^HE greatest of English historians, Macaulay, and one of the most 
^' 'The 

people. " In con- 
/ tormity with this idea, the Biographical Record has been prepared. 
(J Instead of going to musty records, and taking therefrom dry statistical 
matter that can be appreciated by but few, our corps of writers have 
gone to the people, the men and women who have, by their enterprise 
and industry, brought this county to a rank second to none among 
those comprising this great and noble State, and from their lips have the story of their life 
struggles. No more interesting or instructive matter could be presented to an intelligent 
public. In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation 
of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industrj- and 
economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing 
an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout 
the lengtli and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of 
life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in 
every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usuallv 
crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the 
world, have pursued the " even tenor of their way," content to have it said of them, as Christ 
said of the woman performing a deed of mercy — " They nave done what they could." It 
tells how many, in the pride and strength of young manhood, left the plow and the anvil, the 
lawyer's office and the counting-room, left every trade and protession, and at their country's 
call went forth valiantly " to do or die," and how through their efforts the Union was 
restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every 
woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after'. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume and preserve it as a sucred treasure, from 
the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which 
would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been taken in the compilation of the work, 
and every opportunity possible given to those represented to insure correctness in what has 
been written ; and the publishers flatter themselves that they give to their readers a work with 
few errors of consequence. In addition to biographical sketches, portraits of a number of 
representative citizens are given. 

The faces of some, and biographical sketches of many, will be missed in this volume. 
For this the publishers are not to blame. Not having a proper conception of the work, some 
relused to give the information necessary to compile a sketch, while others were indifferent. 
Occasionally some member of the family would oppose the enterprise, and on account of such 
opposition the support of the interested one would be withheld. In a few instances men 
never could be found, though repeated calls were made at their residence or place of business. 



October, 1900. 



The S. J. Clarke Publishing Co, 



" Biograpriij is the onlij true histonj."— Emerson. 




GEORGE W. PATTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 




ox. GEORC.E W. 
PATTOX. At the 
present time it is sel- 
dom that one wins 
prominence in .se\- 
eral lines. It is the 
tendency of the age 
to devote one's en- 
tire energies to a special line, continually 
working upward and concentrating his efforts 
toward accomplishing a desired end ; yet in 
the case of Judge Patton it is demonstrated 
that an exalted position may be reached in 
more than one line of action. He is an emi- 
nent jurist, an able judge and a leader in 
political circles. For several years he was 
successfully engaged in the practice of law in 
Pontiac, and is now serving as judge of tlie 
eleventh judicial circuit. 

The Judge is a native of Pennsylvania, 
and during his infancy was brought to 
Woodford county, Illinois, in 1851, by his 
parents, Samuel R. and Jane (Haines) Pat- 
ton, who were also natives of the Keystone 
state. His paternal grandfather was Rev. 
James Patton. and his great-grandfather. 
Rev. John Patton, both of whom achieved 
some local celebrity as Baptist ministers in 
western Pennsvlvania.the latter having been 



pastor of the church at Smithheld, Fay- 
ette county, for thirty consecutive years, as 
the inscription on his monument, erected by 
his church, still attests. Judge Patton's ma- 
ternal grandparents were John and Marga- 
ret (Anderson) Haines, farming people of 
western Pennsylvania. The latter was a 
tlaughter of James Anderson, a native of 
Ireland, who carried a musket for six years 
in General Washington's arm)' during the 
Revolutionary war. During their entire 
residence in this state the parents of Judge 
Patton made their home in Woodford coun- 
ty, where the mother died in 1873, the father 
in 1886. He was a Diemocrat in politics, a 
successful farmer, a man of great industry, 
indomitable will and strong common sense, 
while the mother was a woman of keen wit,, 
remarkable memory and forceful intellect. 

Reared un the home farm in Woodfordl 
county, Judge Patton attended the common 
schaols of the neighborhood until twenty 
years of age, and then took a three years' 
course at Xormal, Illinois, completing the 
same in 1871. During the following two 
years he taught school in Secor and El Paso, 
Woodford county, and with the money thus, 
earned he commenced the study of law with 
Hav, Green & Littler at Springfield, Illinois^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and was admitted to the bar in 1875, being 
a member of the same class as W. J. Cal- 
houn, ex-Senator T. C. Kerrick and George 
Torrance. Subsequently he again taught 
school and engaged in other pursuits until 
1 88 1, following farming for three years 
to regain his health. In 1881 he com- 
menced the practice of law at Fairbury. this 
county, and two years later located in Pon- 
tiac, where he formed a partnership with C. 
C. Strawn, which was dissolved in 1888. Af- 
ter that time he was alone and succeeded in 
building up a large and lucrative practice. 
On the 7th of June, 1897, he was elected one 
of the judges of the eleventh judicial circuit, 
composed of Livingston, Woodford, Ford, 
McLean and Logan counties, and is now 
most creditably tilling that office. His mind 
is analytical, logical and inductive. With 
a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of 
the fundamental principles of law, he com- 
bines a familiarity with statutory law and a 
sober, clear judgment, which makes him 
not only a formidable adversary in legal 
combat, but has given him the distinction 
of being one of the ablest jurists in this sec- 
tion of the state. 

Although reared in a Democratic at- 
mosphere. Judge Patton has never voted 
that ticket, but is a stanch Republican. He 
was a member of the state central commit- 
tee of his party from 1894 to 1896. He was 
made a Mason at Fairbury, and is now a 
member of Pontiac lodge, Xo. 294. F. & 
A.M. ; Fairbury chapter, R. A. M. ; Chenoa 
council, R. & S. M. ; and St. Paul com- 
mandery, K. T., of Fairbury. He also be- 
longs to the Odd Fellows lodge and en- 
campment, and both he and his wife are 
members of the Pontiac Methodist Episco- 
pal church, in which he is serving as an offi- 
cer. The Judge was married, September 



20, 1877, to Miss Flo Cook, daughter of 
James and Lucinda Cook, of Fairbury, and 
they now have two children, Marie and 
Proctor. 



HAMILTON R. STEWART. 

Hamilton R. Stewart, who for the last 
fifteen years has successfully operated the 
farm of B. M. Stoddard on section 8, Avoca 
township, Livingston county, was born in 
county Derry, Ireland, June 4, 1854, and is 
the oldest cliild of W^illiam and Mary A. 
(McLaughlin) Stewart, also natives of 
county Derry, where the father successfully 
engaged in farming from early manhooil un- 
til his death in 1868. Subsequently his 
widow came to America with her family of 
five sons and one daughter, namely ; Ham- 
ilton R., the subject of this sketch ; Joseph, 
a farmer, who died in Iowa ; Samuel, a resi- 
dent of Avoca township; William, a laborer 
of Ogden, Iowa ; John, deceased ; and Han- 
nah, wife of William Scott, who Ii\'es near 
Rochelle, Ogle county, Illinois. On their 
emigration to America the family located in 
Lexington, Illinois, where they made their 
liome for four years, and in 1872 moved to 
La Salle county, where the following two 
years were passed, coming to Livingston 
county at the end of that time. While in 
Lexington the mother married Thomas 
Clinton, by whom she had one son, Thomas 
F., now a school teacher in Swygart, Illinois. 
Her second husband died in Livingston 
county and she is now living with our sub- 
ject at the age of sixty-seven years. 

Hamilton R. Stewart commenced l^iis 
education in the common schools of his na- 
tive land, and after coming to America, at 
the age of fourteen vears, attended school in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Lexington, Illinois, for a short time. Be- 
ii g the oldest of the family he had to go to 
work on a farm that he might aid in their 
support, and livetl at home until twenty - 
two. While in La Salle county he worked 
in a coal mine in Streator for two years. In 
1876 he left home and was employed as a 
farm hand about five years, at tlie end of 
which time he rented land and embarketl in 
farming on his own account. 

In 1883 Mr. Stewart married Miss Jane 
Blair, who was born in Tazewell county, 
this state, in 1862. Her parents, William 
and Mary (Gillian) Blair, both natives of 
Ireland, located in Tazewell county on their 
emigration to the L'nited States, and after 
residing there for a few years moved to Mc- 
Lean county, where they now make their 
home. The father is a successful farmer. 
In the fariiily were seven children, namely : 
Thomas, a farmer of McLean county ; Jane. 
wife of our subject : David, a prosperous 
farmer of McLean county : Annie, wife of 
11. Gillian, of the same comity: \\'iliiam. 
also a resident of McLean county : and Lydia 
and Addie. both at home. Of the nine chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Stewart, one died 
if infancy. The others are as follows: 
William J. and Mabel M.. who passed tlie 
central schcwM examinations at the ages of 
fifteen and thirteen years respectively, be- 
ing the youngest who ever passed from their 
school, and standing high in rank in a class of 
forty: Minnie P.. Litta G.. Ira J.. Hamil- 
ton G.. Geneveive and Morris M. The par- 
ents are giving their cliildren the best ptjssi- 
ble educational advantages. 

After his marriage Mr. Stewart located 
en a farm in McLean county, where he suc- 
cessfully engaged in general farming for two 
years, and in 1885 mo^ed to the farm of two 
hundred acres in Avoca township. Livings- 



ton county, where he now resides. He is 
a conscientious man, upright and honorable 
in all his dealings, as is shown by his re- 
maining on one farm so long. During his 
residence here he lias been prc:)minently iden- 
tified with local politics. He was justice of 
the peace five years, school trustee si.x years 
and asses.sor two years, being re-elected' for 
a third term, and serving in each office to 
the best of his ability and for the interests 
of the people he represents. He is a man 
who does not draw party lines in local af- 
fairs, but supports those whom he believes 
best qualified to fill the positions, regardless 
of party affiliations. For. the past twelve 
years in national elections he has sup])orted 
the nominees of the Prohibition party and at 
present is township committeeman of that 
party. Socially he is a member of Fairbury 
Cam|). Xo. 6. M. W. A., and religiously is 
a member and active worker in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church and Sunday school, 
serving as a member of the board of trustees 
for the past fourteen years. He is a genial 
gentleman, who is well liked by a large circle 
of friends and acquaintances. 



FREDERICK DUCKETT. 

Success is determined by one's ability to 
recognize opportunity, and to pursue this 
with a resolute and unflagging energy. It 
results from continued labor and the man 
who thus accomplishes his purpose usually 
becomes an important factor in the business 
circles of the community with which he is 
connected and also prominent in pulilic life. 
Through such means Mr. Duckett has at- 
tained a leading place among the representa- 
tive men of Livingston county, which he is 
now serving as county clerk. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



A son of Benjamin and Jane (Redmond) 
Duckett, he was born November lo, 1840, 
in W'edmore, Somersetshire, England, which 
place has been the ancestral home of the 
family for many generations. There the fa- 
ther engaged in farming until his death, 
which occurred when our subject was a boy 
of five or six years. The mother was left 
with six children, five sons and one daugh- 
ter. She spent her entire life in her native 
land and died in the faith of the Episcopal 
church. Those of the family who came to 
America were Francis, now a resident of Des 
Moines, Iowa; Daniel, a physician, who died 
ill Forrest, this county, in 1890; Sarah, wife 
of Jesse Arney. of Kent, \\'^asliington ; and- 
Frederick, our subject. The youngest son, 
Gabriel, is a resident of Australia. 

Frederick Duckett received a good prac- 
tical education in the schools of his native 
Isnd. In 1854, at the age of thirteen years, 
he came alone to the United States and spent 
two years in New York state, where he found 
employment. In 1856 he came to Illinois 
and first located in Henry. Marshall county, 
working on a farm near thereuntil fall, when 
he went to Peoria county and obtained a 
position, where he worked for his board with 
the privilege of attending school. He re- 
mained in that county until the Civil war 
broke out and in the spring of 1862 enlisted 
in Company K. Eleventh Illinois Cavalry. 
Going immediately to the front, he joined 
his regiment at Memphis, Telinessee,-''and 
was first under fire at Lexington, that' state. 
He took part in the second battle of Corinth 
and the siege of \'icksburg, and remained 
ir. active service until mustered out Septem- 
ber 30, 1865, being never off duty a single 
day. He was serving as second lieutenant 
at the time of his discharge. Returning to 
I'eoria county he remained there until 1867, 



when he removed to Forrest, Livingston 
county, and entered in the drug business with 
his brother. Later he became sole proprietor 
of the store, and though he began in a small 
way he carried a large and well-selected 
Slock and had built up an excellent trade at 
the time of disposing of his business. 

On the 19th of February, 1866, Mr. 
Duckett married Miss Mary E. Munhall. 
of Peoria county, a daughter of Samuel 
^lunhall, and to them have been born six 
children : Jeanette, now the wife of H. C. 
Amsbury, of Wellsville New York; Arthur 
F., who married Grace Still well and resides 
ir- Forrest ; Jesse, now ser\-ing as deputv 
county clerk under his father; Nellie M. ; 
Mabel M., wife of Everett Tate, of Pontiac; 
and Aldine, at home.. 

Mr. Duckett attends and supports th.e 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which his 
wife is a member. He is a very active and 
prominent member of several civic societies, 
Vvas one of the organizers of Forrest Post, 
G. A. R., and served as its first commander. 
He has represented it in the state encamp- 
ment several times and was a memljcr of the 
commander's staff one year. He was a 
charter member of Forrest lodge. No. 614, 
F. & A. M., of which he was master about 
ten years, and is now a member of Pontiac 
lodge. No. 294, F. & A. M., of which he has 
been secretary, while at present he is high 
priest of Pontiac chapter, R. A. !M.. and 
past commander of St. Paul Commandery, 
K. T., of Fairbury. He also belongs to 
Chenoa Council. R. & S. M., of Forrest 
lodge, K. P., of which he is past chancellor, 
and the Modern Woodmen of America, of 
which he is past venerable consul. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Duckett 
has been an active Republican. He served 
as collector of his township several terms 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



13 



and was a member of the township board at 
different times. In 1894 he was elected 
county clerk by a gf6od majority and after 
filling that office for four years was renom- 
mated by acclamation in 1898 and elected 
b}- an increasing majority, which sjieaks \^■ell 
for the estimation in which he is held by the 
people of the county, who recognize his abil- 
ity and iitncss for the office. His present 
term will not expire until December, 1902. 
As a citizen he has always been found true 
to every trust rei)osed in him. so that his 
loyalty is above question, being manifest in 
days of ])eace as well as when he folUnved 
the old flag to victory on southern battle 
fields. Since he entered upon the duties of 
liis present office he has made his home in 
Pontiac. 



JAMES P. DAHL. 

James P. Dahl, who is successfully en- 
g-aged in farming on section 3.Eppards Point 
township. Livingston county. Illinois, two 
miles from Pontiac. is a native of Denmark, 
born on the P.altic Sea March 24. 1839. and 
i.- a son of Lars P. and Christina ( Peter- 
son) Dahl, who s]ient their entire li\cs as 
farming jjcople in that country. 

Our subject was reared on a fruin and 
educated in the common schools of his na- 
tive land. His knowledge of the English, 
language has been acquired through his own 
imaided efforts. It was in i860 that he 
crossed the broad .\tlantic. sailing from 
Liver])ofil, England, tt) \ew York, and land- 
ing in the latter city on the 25th of May, 
that year. He came direct to La Salle coun- 
.t)', Illinois, where he had friends living. 
and where he worked on a farm by the 
month for some time. Later he was similarlv 



employed in Putnam county for five vears, 
and from there went to Peru. Illinois, where 
he formed a partnership with his brother-in- 
law, John Dixon, and engaged in fruit grow- 
ing and the milk and dairy business for nine 
}ears, selling out on coming to this countv. 

On the 10th of A])ril. 1877. in Peru. Mr. 
Dahl married Miss Lydia Jensen, a native 
of Copenhagen, Deimiark, and a daughter 
of Paul and Louisa (Otto) Jensen, who were 
also born in that country. The father was 
a business man of Co])enhagen. ]\Irs. Dahl 
was well educated in the schools oi that city 
and came to the new world in 1875. To our 
subject and his wife have been born six chil- 
dren, of whom four are living, namelv : 
.\nna is a well educated young lady, who is 
now successfully engaged in teaching music 
and also serves as organist of the McDowell 
Methodist Episcopal church: William assists 
liis father in the operation of the farm ; and 
Joseph and Clinton are also at home. Carrie 
died at the age of ten years: ]\lary. at the 
age of six months. 

The day after their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Dahl came to Livingston county and he 
]iurchased eightv-four acres of land on sec- 
l.on 3. Eppards Point township, where he 
now resides, anfl has since bonglil forty 
acres m'ore, making a fine farm of one hun- 
dred and twentv-four acres, which he has 
tiled and jjlaced under a high state of cul- 
ti\-ation. He has remodeled the house, 
planted an orchard, erected outbuildings and 
made many other useful and valuable im- 
pro\ements on the place which add greatly 
t(, its attractive appearance. He is quite suc- 
cessfully engaged in general farming and 
slock raising. Originally he was a Repub- 
licrm in politics, but is now a Prohibitionist, 
and at l(ical elections votes for the men whom 
he believes best qualified to fill the offices, 



14 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



regardless of party affiliations. He is now 
an efficient member of the school board and 
president of his district. Religiously -Mr. 
Dahl and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of McDowell 
and are highly respected and esteemed by 
ai; who know them. 



JAMES H. GAFF. 

James H. Gaff, a prominent old resident 
of Pontiac, Illinois, who is now serving as 
justice of the peace and deputy sheriff of 
Livingston county, was born in Xenia, 
Greene county, Ohio, March 23, 1827, a son 
of David M. and Hannah (Mock) Gaff. 
His paternal grandparents were John and 
Martha ( Scott ) Gaff, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania and Maryland respectively, the birth 
place of the former being not far from Get- 
tysburg and Hagerstown.. They were of 
Scotch-Irish descent and members of the old 
Covenanter church. The maternal grand- 
parents were John and Mary (Homey), 
natives of Xorth Carolina.' In 1801 they 
remo\-ed from that state to Xenia, Ohio, in 
a one-horse wagon, resting always on the 
Sabbath day during the journey. Mr. Alock 
helped build the first house ever erected in 
Xenia and owned one hvmdred acres of heav- 
ily timbered land about five miles south of 
where that city now stands. This he cleared 
and transformed into a good farm. Lea\'- 
ing his family and several children at home, 
he enlisted in the war of 18 12, and was sta- 
tioned at McPherson's block house on the 
line between Indiana and Ohio. He and 
his wife spent their last days upon a farm 
Avhich he improved in Fayette county, Ohio. 
She was of Ouaker descent and was a dausfh- 



ter of James Horney, who had charge of the 
train of seventeen wagons in which the Mock 
family moved to Ohio from Xorth Carolina. 
They became members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and old Peter Cartwright 
preached in their house. 

David M. Gaff, the father of our subject, 
was born in Maryland near the Pennsylvania 
hue. and was a young man when the family 
moved to Xenia, Ohio, where he married 
Hannah Mock, a native of Ohio. He fol- 
lowed farming, but died at the early age of 
twenty-seven years, being accidentally killed 
Ixlarch 2~, 183 1. when our subject was only 
four years old, leaving his widow with three 
small children to support. This she did bv 
engaging in weaving. Later she married 
John Calhoun and mo\'ed to Montgomery 
county, Ohio, locating six miles south of 
Dayton, where the family lived until about 
1857, when they came to Illinois and settled, 
near Decatur, Macon county. Mr. Calhoun 
died in Decatur in 1866 and his wife died 
near Bloomington, this state, in 1892, at the 
age of eighty-five years. At an early day John 
Gaff, our suliject's paternal grandfather, who 
was also a soldier of the war of 18 12, floated 
down the Ohio river on a flat boat to Cin- 
cinnati, and from there drove across the 
country to Xenia, where in the midst of the 
forest he commenced to develop a farm, 
which was to have been inherited by our 
subject's father had he not been killed so 
early in life. 

Just before he attained his eighth year 
James H. Gaft'. our subject, went to live with 
an uncle, with whom he remained for four 
3"ears. and then made his home with his 
grandfather j\Iock. Lentil eighteen years old 
ht attended school not to exceed thirty days 
a year, his first books being an elementary 
speller and testament, which were later sup- 



THE BIOGRArmCAL RECORD. 



15 



Ijlemented by the American reader and 
Smith's aritlimetic. The sclux)l house wiierc 
he pursued his studies was a primitive struc- 
ture built of logs, with puncheon floor and 
seats and greased paper windows, and the 
little room often had to accommodate forty 
pu])ils. 

After leaving scliool at tlie age of eiglit- 
een years Mr. GafT learned the blacksmith's 
trade in Teffersonville. serving a three-year-; 
apprenticeship, and then working as a jour- 
neyman at that place for a time. \\'hile there 
he was married. December ^3. 1850. to Miss 
Catherine Powell, a native of Fayette coun- 
ty. Ohio, and a daughter of Harper Powell, 
a farmer. They have one child, Ann E., 
now the wife of Charles Tanquary, of Chi- 
cago, by whom she has a daughter. Helen G. 

On leaving Jefferson ville, Ohio, in tlie 
fall of 185 1. Mr. Gaff moved to what is now 
Cooksville. McLean county. Illinois, where 
he hfiught eighty acres of land and com- 
menced breaking prairie with an ox team. 
In 18^4 he moved to Pleasant Hill and 
opened a blacksmith shop, which he cnn- 
ductcd for five years and then sold. Coming 
to Pontiac he was here engaged in general 
blacksmithing until after the Civil war 
broke out. 

In the fall of iSfij Mr. Gaff enlisted in 
C<impany G, One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and first 
went to Louisville, Kentucky. He was at 
the engagements at Bowling Green, Gallatin 
and Nashville and later started on the Chat- 
tanooga and .\tlanta campaign, his regi- 
ment being one of the first to enter Atlanta 
after the evacuation. They were on the left 
wing of the army in the march to the sea 
and up through the Carolinas to Goldsboro 
and Raleigh. The war having ended they 
continued their march through Richmond to 



\\'ashington, D. C, where they participated 
ill the grand review. They were mustered 
out at Washington June 8, 1865, and dis- 
charged at Chicago on the 21st of that 
month. Mr. GafY had four half-brothers and 
one step-brother in the service, not one of 
whom was ill or wounded while in the army, 
although their aggregate service amounted 
to over nineteen years. 

Returning to his home in Pontiac, Mr. 
Gaff resumed blacksmithing. at which he 
worked until the fall of 1866, when he was 
elected sheriff of the county for a term of 
two years, and the folUnving two years 
served as deputy sheriff, having charge of 
the office for his successor. After clerking 
i:i a store for one year he again opened .t 
Ijlacksmith shop and built up an extensive 
l<usiness. furnishing employment to four 
men. During President Hayes' administra- 
f.on he was appointed postmaster, having 
always been an active Repulilican and chair- 
man of the central committee during the 
Hayes campaign. He had previously filled 
the office of assessor for a number of terms. 
While serving as postmaster the jxjstage on 
a letter was reduced from three to two cents, 
which naturally affected the re\enue of the 
ofiice. He was reappointed by President 
Arthur and for eight years devoted his time 
exclusively to the dutie s of his position. 
Later he spent a year and a half in Kansas, 
returning to Pontiac in 1890. He has served 
as constable four years, justice of the peace 
three years and deputy sheriff since 1891, 
liaving charge of the circuit court. His 
official duties have always been discharged 
in a prompt and able miumer. wh-'ch has 
won the commendation of all concerned. 

Mr. Gaff is one of the oldest members of 
T. Tyle Dickey Post, No. 105. G. A. R.. 
and has servetl as its commander. He 



i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is one of tlie oldest Masons lielonging to 
Pontiac lodge, No. 294. F. & A. M., 
and is a member of Fairbury Chapter, 
R. A. ]\I. For forty years he and his 
^vife have held membership in the ]\Ieth- 
odist Episcopal chnrch and dnring that 
entire time he has served as steward or in 
other official positions. He has also been 
class leader for some time and takes an acti\e 
and prominent part in church work. Dur- 
ing the long years of his residence in Liv- 
ingston county he has been one of its most 
influential and popular citizens — a man hon- 
ored and respected wherever known. 



GEORGE TORRANXE. 

Whatever else may be said of the legal 
fraternity, it cannot be denied that mem- 
bers of the bar have been more important 
actors in public affairs than any other class 
of the American people. This is but the 
natural result of causes which are manifest 
and require no explanation. The ability 
and training which qualify one to practice 
law also Cjualify him in many respects for 
duties which lie outside the strict path of 
his profession and which touch the general 
interests of society. The subject of this 
record is a man who has brought his keen 
discrimination and thorough wisdom to 
bear not alone in professional paths, but also 
for the benefit of"-his fellow citizens and the 
community in which he lives. He is now 
most efficiently and satisfactorily serving as 
superintendent of the Illinois state reform- 
atory at Pontiac. 

Mr. Torrance was born in Lancaster, 
Ohio, May 15, 1847, a son of David and 
Sarah (Kerns) Torrance, both natiN'es of 



Penns}'lvania, and the former of Scotch- 
Irish and the latter of German descent. The 
parents removed from their native state to 
Lancaster, Ohio, and in 1863 came to Illi- 
nois, locating in Danville. Vermilion county, 
where for some time the father engaged in 
business as a contractor and builder, being a 
carpenter by trade. He died in that city. 
While a resident of Ohio he took quite an 
interest in educational affairs, and always 
attended and supported the Pi'esbyterian 
church, though not a member. His wife 
still survives him and continues to make 
her home in Pontiac. 

During his boyhood George Torrance 
attended the common schools of his birth- 
place. He removed with the family to Dan- 
ville, Illinois, and there enlisted, in 1864, in 
Company E, One Hundred and Forty-ninth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was with 
his command in Tennessee, Georgia and Ala- 
bama. He remained in the service until 
the close of the war, being mustered out at 
Dalton, Georgia, and discharged at Camp 
Butler, Illinois. At the age of twenty 
}ears I\Ir. Torrance began his business ca- 
reer as clerk in a grocery store, and was 
later in the United States express office and 
a clothing store of Danville. He came to 
Chatsworth, this county, as a dry-goods 
clerk, and held that position for some time, 
after which he was employed as a commer- 
cial traveler. He served as justice of the 
peace and read law with the firm of Fosdick 
& AVallace, the latter being now Judge Wal- 
lace, of Pontiac. Later he studied for a 
time with A. M. \\'yman, and was admitted 
to practice by examination January 9, 1875. 
He was engaged in practice at Chatsworth 
until the spring of 1881, when he came to 
Pontiac. Here he began practice alone, but 
later was in partnership with R. S. Mclll- 




GEORGE TORRANCE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



19 



<luf. as a member of the firm of Mclllduf & 
Torrance, and when that was dissolved he 
• was alone for some years. Subsequently 
he was engaged in practice with his son im- 
der the firm name of Torrance & Torrance. 
He would never accept criminal cases, but 
as a civil lawyer met with most excellent 
success in his chosen profession. 

On the 9th of June, 1869, Mr. Torrance 
was united in marriage with Miss Eliza M. 
Fenn, of Chatsworth, a daughter of Elam P. 
Fenn, a farmer, from Connecticut, and to 
ihem have been born two children : Herbert 
E., now an attorney of P'ontiac; and Grace 
Tren. Tlie family attend the Presbyterian 
churcli. of which Mrs. Torrance is a mem- 
ber. 

As a Republican Mr. Torrance has 
taken an active and influential part in po- 
litical affairs, and has been chairman of the 
county committee. In the fall of 1880 he 
was elected to the state senate and served 
two terms of four years each with credit to 
himself and to the entire satisfaction of his 
constituents. During this time he was one 
of the one hundred and three who helped to 
elect General Logan to the United States 
senate. 

Mr. Torrence was appointed superin- 
tendent of the Illinois State Reformatory, 
March i, 1897. Realizing that if it was 
to properly perform the work designed for 
it many changes must be made in its build- 
ings, schools, etc., he immediately began his 
labors along that line. This institution, 
with the great outlay of money necessary to 
its building, and the wants of fifteen hun- 
dred inmates to look after, including their 
schooling and discipline, would be a tax 
upon the strength of any man, but with this 
additional work has been a heavy burden, 
which he has borne with wonderful forti- 



tutle. Though critised and condemned at 
times, he has never faltered, but patiently 
awaited the time which he felt sure must 
come when his work would meet with pub- 
lic approval. It has now arrived and the 
discipline of the inmates, the success of its 
trade and common school work, and the 
beauty of the grounds are generally com- 
mentled and the institution is recognized as 
among the most successful of its kind in the 
world. Mr. Torrance has been told that 
he expected to leave the institution as a 
monument to his work in this state, and if 
gi\en time would place it in such a position 
tiiat it could not be surpassed by any other 
in the near future. That he has succeeded 
is now conceded and his former critics are 
loud in his praise, and the doubting yet hope- 
ful friends jubilant over his success. 

The discipline is excellent, yet without 
apparent severity. Tiiere seems to be a hope- 
ful, contented air permeating the whole in- 
stitution, and he has not elsewhere and prob- 
ably never will have better friends than can 
be found among the boys in his custody. 
They speak kindly of him, are very respect- 
ful to him and obey his requests or com- 
mands as cheerfully as if he was paying 
them salaries. One by one the former modes 
of punishment have been abolished until the 
shackle, hand-cuff, ball line, solitary, etc., 
are relegated to the things that were. Pa- 
rade and assembly grounds have been ar- 
ranged, fine lawns, cement walks and flower 
l)eds constructed, until tiie mner yard is a 
beautiful park, the admiration of all that 
see it. Great attention has been paid by 
him to the training of inmates in both in- 
strumental and vocal music until the insti- 
tution has one of the best bands in the state. 
A military organization has lieen perfected, 
and it is unsurpassed anywhere, outside of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



West Point. To insiruct tlie inmates he 
has about twenty-two common and twenty- 
live trade schools, classes in ethics, Sunday 
school, chapel services, lectures, concerts 
and entertainments of various kinds. 

With him the work is not performed for 
the salary alone ; it has become a work into 
which he throws his entire energy and 
ability. A visit to the institution is very 
instructive and interesting, and hundreds 
inspect it e\'ery week, as many as fifteen hun- 
dred being conducted through it in one 
week last summer. In the handling of hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars, the making 
and looking after many contracts with build- 
ers, machinists and plumbers, not one word 
of scandal has ever been heard, not a dif- 
ference ever existed but has been adjusted 
without discord. The same is true in re- 
gard to his officers ; differences often exist, 
but under his direction they are harmonized 
t)r he takes hold with a firm hand and set- 
tles them beyond further controversy. One 
employe said : "T have worked at other 
institutions and found much trouble among 
the officers always existing. This one runs 
without friction.'" As an organizer and di- 
rector, he is unsurpassed. He possesses ex- 
ecutive ability of a high order, has had great 
experience in public matters, is an excellent 
lawyer, an extensive reader and possesses a 
brain that works rapidly. Probably no man 
in the state is required to promptly pass 
upon so many matters embracing all the 
lines of industry and education as he is, or 
that could do so with less deliberation. 

For nearly six years Mr. Torrance has 
been officially connected witli the high school 
of Pontiac, and was president of the board 
almost five years, during which time the 
school was opened and raised to its present 
high standing among similar institutions in 



the state. Other official honors would have 
been conferred upon him had he not de- 
clined, refusing to allow his name to go far- 
ther on the party ticket. Upright, reliable 
and honorable, his strict adherence to prin- 
ciple commands the respect of all, and as a 
pleasant, affable gentleman he makes many 
friends. 



JOHN K. OLESON. 

John K. Oleson, who resides on section 
8, Pontiac township, is one of the success- 
ful farmers of Livingston countv. He is 
a native of Norway and was born June 20, 
1 83 1, just sixty-nine years from the day the 
notes for this sketch were taken. He grew 
to manhood on a farm in his native country 
and until about thirteen years old attended 
the parochial schools. He then had to begin 
making his own living and engaged in farm 
labor. 

The life of a poor man in Norway is 
not one for envy, and the opportunity for 
advancement is not such as is afforded in 
the L'nited States. Realizing this fact, Mr. 
Oleson determined to emigrate to this coun- 
try, and accordingly, in 1858, he took pas- 
sage in a sailing vessel, crossed the Atlantic, 
and landed in Quebec. From that city he 
came west to Chicago, and from there to 
La Salle county. Illinois, where he com- 
menced work on a farm by the month, and 
continued to be thus employed for several 
years, saving as much of his wages as possi- 
ble. 

\Miile yet living in La Salle county, Mr. 
Oleson was united in marriage with Miss 
Elsie Olson, by which union two children 
were born. Ole R., the eldest is now mar- 
ried and has one son. He is enaged in farm- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing in Livingston county. Emma is the wife 
of Ole Knudson and they have four sons. 

In 1870 Mr. Oleson came to Livingston 
county and purchased a farm of eighty acres 
and also rented a place on which was an old 
log house. The place had formerly heen 
worked, but when he obtained possession it 
had mostly grown up to grass and weeds 
and only about fifteen acres was fenced. 
Life in Livingston county was commenced 
under very discouraging circumstances, but 
he had grit and determination, and the un- 
sightly weeds soon disappeared and the land 
was placed under cultivation. A small house 
was first erected, which in due time, gave 
place to a larger and better one, and the 
area of the farm was increased until the 
farm now comprises two hundred and twenty 
acres, all of which is under cultivation and 
the land tilled and well drained throughout. 

Politically Mr. Oleson is a Republican, 
with which party he has been identified since 
coming to this country. On his arrival the 
slavery question was being agitated and the 
country was almost in the midst of the throes 
of a revolution. Lincoln and Douglas were 
holding their great debate, and the young 
Norwegian naturally took his place on the 
side of those who were fighting for freedom. 
His first presidential vote was cast in 1864 
for Abraham Lincoln, while his last was 
cast for William McKinley. He was reared 
in the Lutheran faith and is yet a member of 
that church. His wife is also a member of 
the same church. 

Mr. Oleson was a poor man when he 
came to the United States, and for several 
years he had a hard struggle to obtain a 
foothold, but he persevered, with the result 
that he now has one of the best improved 
farms in Pontiac township, within three 
miles of the countv seat, and he can calmlv 



look the future in the face, knowing that he 
has sufficient to carry him through old age 
in comfort, if not in luxury. His forty-two 
years in this country have served to broaden 
his views and to make him progressive and 
thoroughlv American in all things. All who 
know him have for him the utmost respect.- 



JOEL ALLEX. M. D. 

Joel Allen. M. D.. a prominent and suc- 
cessful physician of Pontiac, Illinois, is a 
native of this state, born on his father's farm 
in Jefiferson county. Xovember 13, 1827. and 
is a son of Abel and Prudence ( Wilkey) 
Allen, naties of Kentucky and Georgia, re- 
spectively. His paternal grandfather, James 
Allen was born in Virginia, and wiien quite 
young moved to Kentucky, where he en- 
gaged in farming for some years, coming 
to Illinois about 1819. locating in Jefiferson 
county, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, dying about 1830. The Doctor's father, 
who was a prosperous farmer, lived in his 
native state until about thirty-five years of 
age, when he came to Illinois and settled in 
Jefferson county, where he continued to fol- 
low his chosen occu])ation until his death, 
which occurred at his home March 29, 1869, 
at the aee of seventy- four years. His wife 
survived him about six years and died on 
the old homestead in Jefferson county, June 
3, 1875. For a quarter of a century she 
was a great invalid and for the last ten years 
of her life was also entirely helpless, requir- 
ing much care and attention. The Doctor 
has one brother in this county. Christopher 
Columbus Allen, a farmer of Pontiac town- 
ship. 

Dr. .Mien obtained h's early education 
in the district schools of Jefferson county. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and assisted his father with tlie farm wiirk 
until twenty-two years of age. He had a 
great fondness for tlie study of medicine 
and for some time read witli his uncle, Dr. 
Carter Wilkey. with a view of fitting himself 
for the medical profession. 

On the 14th of Novemher, 1849, Dr. 
Allen was united in marriage with Aliss 
Martha Trowhridge. a daughter of Philo 
and Martha Trowbridge of Jefferson county, 
AA'here her father was successfully engaged 
in farming until his deatli, about 1855. By 
this union were four children, all of whom 
are li\ing. namely: Hardin A., liorn in Jef- 
ferson county, wedded Mary Kinnehan, of 
Livingston county, and is now a pa\-ement 
and concrete walk contractor of Streator, 
Illinois ; Lydia A. is the wife of A. C. Scott, 
<i prominent farmer of Eppard's Point town- 
ship, Livingston county ; Laura is the wife of 
T. C. Taylor, a dealer in hardware and ag- 
ricultural implements of Pendleton Oregon ; 
and J. Brown married Lizzie Labourn and 
is a street car conductor of Den\er, Colo- 
rado. 

After his marriage Dr. Allen continued 
farming for some years in Jefferson county 
and then went to Lincoln, Logan county, 
where he was engaged in the manufacture 
of brick until the death of his wife, which 
occurred January 15, 1858. He then came 
to Livingston county and again took up 
farming, at the same time continuing his 
medical studies, being thus employed until 
the outbreak of the Civil war. He was again 
luarried, December 6, i860, his second union 
being with Emily Tromh', by whom he had 
two children : Gertrude, born in La Salle 
county, August 2^. 1861. resides at home, 
and Jessie P., born in this county, July 17, 
1866, is the wife of Robert Harms, a farmer 
of Rock Island, Illinois. 



In August, 1862, Dr. Allen enlisted at 
]\linonk, Woodford county, in Company H, 
Seventy-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
as hospital steward and remained in the serv- 
ice three years, having charge of his regi- 
ment as physician and surgeon the last two 
years. He was serving as second assistant 
surgeon at the time he was mustered out 
with his regiment at Mobile, July 25, 1865. 
They participated in sixteen battles, the first 
being at Chickasaw Bluft', in the rear of 
Yicksburg, and for forty days was m the 
siege of Vicksburg. The following winter 
was passed in New Orleans and in the spring 
the command took Fort Gaines on Mobile 
Bay, also Spanish Fort and Fort Blakeley. 

After the close of the war Dr. Allen re- 
turned to Livingston county. While in New 
Orleans he took a course of medical lectures 
and on his return, as a representative of the 
Pxlectic School of Medicine, he commenced 
practice in this county, and was not long 
ni securing a liberal patronage. In the fall of 
1882 he moved to Graymont, where he en- 
gaged in practice and also conducted a drug 
store until coming to Pontiac, in October, 
1888. He has his office at his handsome 
residence. No. 307 East North street, and 
although well advanced in years continues 
to engage hx active practice. 

For his third wife Dr. Allen married 
Mrs. Mary Hallam, of Livingston county, 
a daughter of James Carson, a farmer of this 
county, now deceased. She died in Pontiac, 
December 5, 1888, leaving no children. On 
the 1 2th of November, 1889, in Pontiac, 
the Doctor married ]\Irs. Addie E. Pound, 
oldest daughter of John S. and Eunice 
(Packer) Lee. The father, a native of 
Connecticut, and a blacksmith by trade, 
came to Illinois in 1857 and settled at Pleas- 
ant Ridge, near Lexington, where he fol- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



23 



lowed his trade for two years, and tlien 
came to Pontiac. He now makes his home 
with the Doctor and his wife, Mrs. Lee 
having died at her home in Pontiac in 1896. 
They had tliree cliildren besides Mrs. Allen, 
namely: Hattie, wife of Josepli Roggy, a 
farmer of Nebraska ; Frank P., who is em- 
ployed in a pork packing establishment in 
Chicago, and Charles, agent on the Ilinois 
Central Railroad at Riverdale, Illinois. 

Mrs. Allen was born in Connecticut. De- 
cember 24, 1850, and was seven years of age 
when she came to this state with her par- 
ents. She is a lady of refinement, iiighly 
educated, and after the death of her first 
husband she was, for a number of years, 
successfully engaged in teaching in the dis- 
trict schools of this county, and for a period 
pf eight years in the public schools of Pon- 
tiac. Her first husband was Joseph Pound, 
a farmer living near McDowell, Livingston 
county, by whom she had two children, Mary 
and Alfred, both now deceased. The Doc- 
tor and Mrs. Allen have one child. Wayne 
Lee, who was born in Pontiac, May 10, 1892. 
Li his political views Dr. Allen is a Republi- 
can, but has never sought or desired public 
office, preferring to devote his entire time and 
attention to his professional duties. He is 
a member of the Methodist church of Pon- 
tiac, and is honored and respected l)y all 
who know him. Mrs. Allen is also a mem- 
ber of the Metliodist Episopal church. 



REV. E. F. WRIGHT. 

Rev. E. F. Wright, who for six years 
has been the beloved pastor of the Congre- 
gational church at Dwight. Illinois, was 
born July 21, 1842, in Shoreham, \'ermont, 



adjoining Whiting, where Senator Sawyer 
was born. His paternal grandfather was 
Andrew Wright, a native of Connecticut, 
and a soldier of the Revolutionary war, who 
after that struggle migrated to Shoreham, 
\ ermont. and took up a large tract of land. 
He was married twice and reared a large 
tamily. The youngest of his children by the 
second marriage was Samuel Wright, our 
subject's father, who in early life followed 
the sea, sailing first on a whaling vessel and 
later on a merchantman. After giving up 
the sea he made his home in \'ermont for 
some time, but spent the last three years of 
his life in Jackson county, Michigan, where 
he died when our subject was only four 
}ears old. He was twice married, but his 
first wife died young, leaving no children. 
His second wife was Minerva Knowlton, a 
native of New York state, by whom he had 
three children, namely: E. F., our subject; 
Florence, wife of C. W. Piatt, of North 
Adams, Massachusetts; and Charles T., a 
resident of Crow Point, New York. The 
motlier survived her husband many years, 
dying in Rutland, \'ermont. 

Our subject was reared by his father's 
sister and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. Lu- 
cius Robison, and his early education was 
acquired in the district schools of Vermont, 
which he attended during the winter months. 
He was eighteen years of age when tiie civil 
war broke out and was one of the first from 
his state to enlist, joining Company K, Sec- 
ond Vermont Volunteer Infantry, May 17, 
1861. He was mustered into the United 
States service at Burlington, and in June 
went to the front, participating in his first 
battle — that of Bull Run — on the nineteenth 
anniversary of his birth, July 21, 1861. His 
regiment was in the Peninsular campaign, 
the siege of Yorktown, the battles of Lee's 



24 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mills and Williamstown, and the seven days' 
battle in front of Richmond. He was ill 
and off duty from August, 1862, until Jan- 
uary, 1863, and after rejoining his command 
took part in the battle of Chancellorsville. 
The regiment gained distinction the follow- 
ing day by making a famous charge on St. 
Mary's Height, and later participated in the 
battle of the Wilderness, where they lost 
three hundred and thirty-six men. The 
brigade of which Mr. Wright was a mem- 
ber probably lost more than any other in 
the service. He was mustered out June 
29, 1864, and returned home. 

Previous to leaving the army Mr. Wright 
was converted, and soon after his return 
home entered the academy at Barry, Ver- 
mont, where he spent two years. The fol- 
lowing year he was a student at Newbury, 
Vermont, and in the summer of 1866 en- 
tered Middlebury College, from which he 
was graduated in 1870, with the degree of 
A. B., receiving the degree of A. M. three 
years later. In the autumn of 1870 he com- 
menced teaching in the academy, where he 
remained two years, and in 1872 was called 
to the pastorate of the Congregational 
church at Danby, Vermont, where he was 
ordained and installed in 1873. 

On the nth of November, 1871, Mr.. 
Wright married Mrs. 'Ellen M. Marsh, of 
Norwich, Vermont, who died July 4, 1874, 
leaving one son, Robert Hopkins, who is 
now married and in the employ of the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad at Dubuque, Iowa. 
After the death of his wife, Mr. Wright en- 
tered the Chicago Theological Seminary, 
from which he was graduated in 1876. While 
attending that institution he had served as 
pastor of the Congregational church at Des 
Plaines, Illinois, and later was in charge of 
the church at Seward, Winnebago county, 



eight years ; .Rockton three years, and Crys- 
tal Lake, Illinois, for a time. From the last 
named place he came to Dwight, where he 
has now been for the past six years, during 
which time he has built up the church and 
has ministered faithfully to the spiritual 
needs of his people. He is not only well 
liked by his own congregation, but is hon- 
ored and esteemed by all who have wit- 
nessed his devotion to his noble calling. 

Mr. Wright was again married, Septem- 
ber 7, 1876, his second union being with 
Miss M. S. Stone, of Pecatonica, Winne- 
bago county, Illinois, by whom he has two 
children, namely : Florence, who is now 
bookkeeper and stenographer for the Dwight 
Star and Herald ; and Clarence. Both re- 
side at home. 



ARCHIE CRABB. 

The early home of this well-known and 
honored citizen of Pike township was on 
the other side of the Atlantic, and on com- 
ing to the new \\'orld he was in limited cir- 
cumstances, but so successful has he been 
in his business undertakings that he is now 
able to lay aside all labor and live a retired 
life upon his farm on section 4, Pike town- 
ship, Livingston county, about eight miles 
from Chenoa. 

Mr. Crabb was born in Arbroath, For- 
farshire. Scotland, June 18, 1833, a son of 
James and Cecelia (Monroe) Crabb, also 
natives of that county, \\here the mother 
died. The father, who followed the sea in 
early life, came to the United States after 
the death of his wife and spent his last years 
with a daughter in Illinois. During his 
boyhood and youth our subject had limited 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



25 



school advantages, and is mostly self-edu- 
cated. In 1854 he took passage on a sail 
vessel bound for Montreal, Canada, and was 
seven weeks in crossing the Atlantic, dur- 
ing which time the ship encountered some 
severe storms. On their arrivfal in Quebec 
they were quarantined for two weeks, there 
being some twenty cases of smallpox on 
board. Mr. Crabb spent about six months 
in the city of Montreal, where he worked at 
his trade, that of a blacksmith. 

In 1854 he came to Illinois, and first lo- 
cated in Tazewell county, where he worked 
for his uncle, William Monroe, as a farm 
hand, for about two years and a half, at 
ten dollars per month. He next engaged 
in farming for himself upon rented land in 
the same county, where he continued to 
make his home until 1866, and in the mean- 
time purchased eighty acres of land in Pike 
township, Livingston county, where he now 
resides. He located here in 1866, and com- 
menced immediately to break the virgin soil, 
upon which he built a small house. Later 
he purchased an adjoining eighty-acre tract, 
and still later another eighty-acre tract, and 
today has a fine farm of two hundred and 
forty acres, which he has placed under a 
high state of cultivation and improved with 
good and substantial buildings, which stand 
as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. 
After years of faithful toil he can now well 
afford to lay aside all business cares and en- 
joy a well earned rest. 

In Tazewell county. December 25, 1861, 
Mr. Crabb married Miss Mary Ann Dor- 
ward, who was born and reared in the same 
neighborhood in Scotland as her husband 
and came to the new world in 1853, locat- 
ing in Illinois. To them have been born 
six children, namely: Florence, now the 
wife of William Snethen, of Pike township; 



John Henry, who is married and engaged in 
farming in the same township; Robert, also 
an agriculturist of Pike township; Marga- 
ret, wife of Lewis Brinkman, of Rooks 
Creek township; Cecelia, wife of Louis Salz- 
man. of the same township; and Agnes, wife 
of C. B. Rollins, who operates the Crabb 
farm. 

Mr. Crabb voted for Abraham Lincoln 
in i860, but since 1868 has been independent 
in politics, giving his suport to the men and 
measures that he believes will best advance 
the interests of the public regardless of party 
lines. He has taken <iuite an active part 
in local politics, and is now serving his sixth 
term as supervisor, and is now a member of 
the committees on public buildings, county 
house and farm, fee;^ and salaries. He has 
also served as township clerk, assessor and 
treasurer, which office of treasurer he now 
holds, and as township trustee eighteen 
years. He and his wife are active members 
of the Presbyterian church, and his public 
and private life are alike above reproach, for 
his career has ever been one characterized 
by the utmost fidelity to duty. He and his 
family receive and merit the high regard of 
the entire communitv. 



THE LESLIE E. KEELEV CO. 

Time tests the merit of all things, and 
the years with unerring accuracy set their 
stamp of approval upon all that comes be- 
fore the public notice, or cause to sink into 
oblivion that which is not worthy of atten- 
tion. Only truth is eternal, while "error 
wounded, writhes in pain and dies among 
her worshippers." There is no escape from 
such results; the ages have proven this, and 
the law will hold good throughout all time. 



26 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In the face of the most bitter opposition 
tliere was given to the world a wonderful 
discovery by Dr. Leslie E. Keeley, of 
Dwight, Illinois. He early met the ridicule 
and persecution of the medical fraternity, of 
which he was a member, and the amused and 
oftentimes abusive disbelief of the world, but 
time proved the efficacy and vaUie of his 
discovery, and today he is known as one 
of the greatest benefactors that America 
produced in the nineteenth century. 

Although the founder has passed away 
his living record forms an epitaph time will 
never efface, and the work he created is con- 
tinued under the corporate name of The 
Leslie E. Keeley Company, the leading mem- 
bers being Major Curtis J. Judd and John R. 
Oughton, the latter the present mayor of 
Dwight, while the former for several years 
was a successful merchant and filled posi- 
tions in the e.xecutix'e departments of the 
village. The history of the Keeley Insti- 
tute forms the most important chapter in 
the history of Dwight, for prior to its es- 
tablishment the little' village was scarcely 
h^ard of outside of a radius of a few miles, 
and seemed to have little business or com- 
mercial prosperity outside of the farming 
industry before it. Today no city of equal 
size in the Union is as widely known. 

In 1866 Dr. Leslie E. Keeley was grad- 
uated from Rush Medical College, of Chi- 
cago, and in seeking a location, determined 
upon this little village in Livingston county, 
Illinois. He soon won an enviable repu- 
tation, and enjoyed a large practice which 
came to him from miles around ; but while 
he successfully performed his daily duties 
as a general practitioner, he became inter- 
ested in the cjuestion of a possible cure for 
inebriety. He ga\-e careful thought, study 
and investigation to the matter, prompted by 



a love of scientific research, but more than 
all by the great humanitarian principles 
which ever formed a basic element in the 
character of Dr. Keeley. At length he be- 
came convinced that drunkenness was a dis- 
ease just as surely as a fever or any other 
disease which comes under the care of the 
physician. He became convinced that there 
was nothing in the claim that heredity had 
anything tu do with either. He believed 
that while a neurosis might be entailed upon 
descendants, they were not from necessity 
liquor or drug users. He defined drunken- 
ness as "a conditon wherein the nerve cells 
have become so accustomed to performing 
their duties and functions under the in- 
fluence of alcohol that they are dependent on 
it and will no longer perform those duties 
and functions jjroperly and painlessly e.x- 
cept when under its influence." This 
theory has long been accepted by physicians 
throughout the country, and is taught in the 
leading text-books on physiology and hy- 
giene in our public schools, but at the time 
Dr. Keeley advanced it he met with the 
greatest opposition from the medical frater- 
nity. Hoping to perfect a cure for this con- 
dition of the nerve cells, he wrote to several 
well-known physicians to ascertain what 
they knew about the effects of salts of gold. 
A few responded and their information was 
meager, but Dr. Keeley continued to investi- 
gate and experiment, and as a result, per- 
fected not only the cure but the system of 
treatment. 1 he storm of abuse and oppo- 
sition which he brought down upon him- 
self can hardly be imagined. The president 
of a prominent medical college, with whom 
he took counsel, advised him thus : "Main- 
tain the secret of your discovery if you 
think it of use to humanity, but the pro- 
fession will not leave a shred of your medical 



Till-: iUOCRArillCAL RECORD. 



27 



reputation." Tliis was painfully true, hut 
he fought his and humanity's hattle nohiy, 
imtil now tliousands have hecn henctited l)y 
Iiis treatment, the number reachini;- nmre 
than three hundred thousand. 

It was in 1880 that Dr. Keeley ahamloned 
general i)ractice and began gi\ing his en- 
tire attention to the cure of those wlio had 
become slaves to alcohol,' opium and other 
very injurious drugs. He early associated 
with him Major Judtl and Mr. Oughlon. iuu\ 
the connection was maintained until the 
Doctor's death. These gentleman were 
prominent, popular and reliable business 
men of Dwight, and their faith in Dr. Kee- 
ley and his discoveries did much to gain for 
him the confidence of his home comnnmit\'. 
Major Judd is now the secretary and treas- 
urer of the company, and Mr. Oughton is 
president and chemist. Soon after the part- 
nershi]) was formed Mr. Oughlon was given 
the f(jrmulae and being an e.xpert chemist 
has comi)ounded the Keeley remedies to the 
l)resent time. 

With three such men as Dr. Keeley. Ma- 
jor Judd and Mr. Oughton at the head of 
the Institute its success was assured, al- 
though it was almost a decade before it 
gained the recognition and assistance of the 
press. (Gradually pulilic opijosition was 
lessened, as those who came to the Institute 
under the curse of inebriety went away sober, 
intelligent citizens, ready to lake their places 
again in the work of the world. Their tes- 
timony and influence lead to the u;rowth of 
the work, the luunber of patients gradually 
yet constantly increased, and it is estimated 
that twenty-five thou.sand t(jok the treatment 
])rior to 1891, when J(jseph Meilill became 
its champion and advocated tiie cause 
through the colmnns of the Chicago Tribune. 
Before .so doing, however, he thoroughlv in- 



vestigated the cure. In an editorial in the 
Chicago Tribune he said: "1 tested this 
cure: 1 selected a half-dozen of the toughest 
])roducts of alcoholi.sm that the Chicago sa- 
loons had been able to turn out, and the 
drunkard-making shops in no other-city can 
beat them in their line of workmanship. The 
experimental cases were .sent down to 
Dwight. one at a lime, extending over a 
period of several weeks, and in due time 
they were all returned to me, looking as if 
a veritable miracle had Ijeen wrought upon 
them. The change for the better was so 
great thai I scarcely recognized them. They' 
went away .sots and returned gentlemen. It 
was amazin.g, and coinerted me to a belief 
in the cfticacx of the "(jold Cure' for alco- 
holism and opium. Well, I did not stop 
with the half-dozen specially selected cases, 
but sent down to Dwight a number of ine- 
briate ac(iuainlauces to take the treatment, 
as I was anxious to reclaim those old friends 
who had been res])ected and useful citizens 
before the 'drink liabii' had ruined their 
li\es. When 1 had thus become fully con- 
vinced that drunkenness was a disease, the 
result of imbibing poison, and that a mcfli- 
cine had been discov'ered which releasetl the 
\ ictim from the irrepressible thirst for alco- 
hol, and that it rest()red the man to normal 
health of bodv and mind, I felt it to be a 
duty which I owed to humanilv to make 
known the virtue of the Keeley Cure as fast 
antl as far as in mv power, and I rejoice that 
the control of a widely-read journal enabled 
me to reach the minds of a multitude of in- 
telligent people. I opened the columns of 
my i)aper freely to the rescued victims (jf al- 
cohol, who related their experience and tes- 
tified to what the Keeley Cure hafl done for 
them." The Tribune's exam])Ie was imme- 
diately followed by that of other leading 



28 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



journals in Chicago, and then throughout 
the country, until the Keeley Institute of 
Dwiglit became largely known throughout 
the length and breadth of the lau 

Jt was soon found that the accommoda- 
tions at Dwight were totally inadequate, so 
greatly did the number of patients increase. 
Dr. Keeley, Major Judd and Mr. Oughton 
lield consultation and it was determined that 
the congestion at Dwight should be relieved 
at once by the openiing of branch institutes. 
The first one was established at Des ^Moines, 
Iowa, soon others were started in New \ ork 
and Pennsylvania, and after this branches 
sprang up in various places until at the pres- 
ent time there are one or more in nearly eve-\- 
state and territory. The most notable work 
perliaps was accomplished at the Lea\-er.- 
worth branch of the National Soldiers" 
Home, where nearly fifteen hundred \eter- 
ans of the war of the Rebellion were treated 
with the most gratifying results, and the re- 
port of the board of managers to congress 
and the secretary of war spoke of the great 
good accomplished. The treatment was 
also administered in the Soldiers" Home at 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Hampton, Virginia, 
Los Angeles, California, and others, Avith 
excellent results. ]Many men and officers 
of the regular army have also taken the 
treatment, sixty Indians from the Cherokee 
and Osage reservations were sent to the 
branch in Kansas Citv, and the results were 
so favorable to the cure as to prompt the 
writing of a letter by Chief Justice Connor, 
of the Indian Territory, to Dr. Keeley, prais- 
ing the treatment in the highest terms. Sixty- 
ii\e men in tlie work-house of Minneapi.ilis 
were sent by the mayor of that cit\' to the 
branch institute there, and a large majority 
of them, although they had been \'ictims of 
inebriety, convicted from two to twenty- 



nine times, were enabled to leave the work- 
house, and were changed from wards of the 
state to self-supporting, self-respecting citi- 
zens. To cite, either collectxely or indi- 
xidually, the wonderful ciu'es effected by 
the SN'stem inaugurated by Dr. Keeley would 
fill a large \-olume ; suffice it to say that 
more than three hundred thousand have 
taken the cure, and the greater number have 
remained sober, useful citizens. 

The cure for drunkenness is usually ef- 
fected in four weeks. 1 here is no sickness 
attendant upon the treatment, and 'the phys- 
ical condition impro\es from the start. Men 
are also freed from the opium, morphine, 
laudanum, cocaine and chli>ral habits. The 
patients are left absolutely free, there being 
ri(j restraining influences other than those 
of law-abiding citizenship. All patients 
are treated alike and stand on the same 
footing. It is interesting to note the many 
exhibitions of kindness and good will of 
the patients towards each other. A useful 
lesson is ta:ught by this democracy of the 
Keeley Institute — a man of humble station 
is lifted up and given a new trend, whereas 
a man of high position is convinced more 
than ever of the leveling qualities of drink 
toward the lowest strata of society. 

The Livingston Hotel of Dwight is 
owned and conducted by the Leslie E. Kee- 
ley Company, and is an excellently conducted 
hostelry, with pleasantly arranged rooms, 
well lighted and ventilated, and tastefully 
furnished. The laboratory is one of the 
finest and best equipped in the country, and 
the offices are models of convenience. 

Dwight certainly owes her prosperity 
in \-erv large measure to the Leslie E. Kee- 
ley Company. Prior to the establishment 
of the institute it was an ordinary country 
town, without electric lights, without water- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



29 



works and without drainage. Today it has 
all the accommodations and improvements 
of cities many times its size, this result being 
largely obtained through the efforts of the 
members of the Keeley Company. Jt is 
safe to say that no private institution in the 
entire country is so well known as the insti- 
tute at Dwight, nor is there one whose in- 
fluence and efforts ha\e been so beneficial 
and far reaching. 

The business of the Leslie E. Keeley 
Cnmpan\- is conducted upon a liberal prin- 
ciple and most approved business methods. 
'] he sNstem is the result of years of expe- 
rience and intelligent work, and cannot be 
improved upon. Visitors to Dwight inva- 
riably inspect the general ofifices as one of 
the sights of the village. While it has been 
a paying investment to its owners, it cer- 
tainly deserves to be ranked among the 
greatest institutions for good that the nine- 
teenth centurv has known. 



.MATTHIAS TO.MBAL'GH. 

Matthias Tumbaugh, deceased, was one 
of the most prominent of the early educators 
of this county, and served as county super- 
intendent of schools for several years, dur- 
ing which time there was a marked im- 
l)rovement made in the educational sys- 
tem then in vogue here. He was born near 
Washington, Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, June II, 1835, and there grew to 
manhood. His parents were Mathias aiul 
Rachel (Spohn) Tombaugh, life-long resi- 
dents of that county and of German descent. 
The mother survived her husband several 
years, dying about 1890. 

Our subject completed his literary edu- 



cation at Mt. Union College, and then com- 
menced teaching school in his native county, 
serving as superintendent of schools at 
Monongahela City for a time. While there 
he married Miss Elivira J. Lethern'ian. who 
was born lune 1 1, 1838, a daughter of John 
ami Christina Lethermaii. of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, ami nf German de- 
scent. Her father was a soldier of the war 
of 181J, and a fanner by occupation. To 
Mr. and Mrs. TomlKuigh were born seven 
children, ti\e of whom are still living, name- 
ly: Charles K., who is represented on an- 
other page of this volume; Alice I., wife of 
E. F. Pound, of Glen Elder, Kansas ; Dr. 
Frank M., medical examiner for the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad at 
Burlington, Iowa; Nettie Z., wife of W. V. 
Worthley, of Odell, Illinois"; and John L., 
a student in the Chicago Medical College. 
Raymond R., the third in order of birth, 
died June 25, 1886, at the age of nineteen 
years. Horace Rcicl, the tifih child died 
in infancy. 

In 1865 Mr. Tombaugh came to Living- 
ston county, Illinois, and purchased land in 
Reading t(jwnship, when this country was 
(|uite new and but slightly improved. Af- 
ter making his home there for three years 
he moved to Sunbury township and bought 
another farm. While living there he served 
as principal of the schools of Odell for one 
year, and in 18873 ^^'^^ elected county su- 
])erintendent of scht/ols, which important 
])osition he held until i88j, the term at that 
time being four years. While in office a 
change was made in the election laws and 
he was elected by the board of supervisors 
for one year. During his incumbency he 
made many important changes in the schools 
which have been of permanent \alue. and it 
is conceded that he was a verv effective 



3° 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



scliool officer. Selling his farm in Sun- 
bury township, in 1876, he bought property 
in Odell township, and successfully en- 
gaged in farming there u]) to the time of 
his death. 

After 1882 Mr. Tombaugh served as su- 
pervisor of his township and was also a 
member of the Odell school board. He 
was a Republican in politics and a member 
of the Masonic fraternity. Both he and 
his wife held membership in the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and took an active part 
in its work. He served as superintendent of 
the Sunday schools twelve years ; was presi- 
dent of the County Sunday School Associa- 
tion ; and was also steward, trustee and 
church secretary, in fact was one of the pil- 
lars of his church. While one of a fishing 
party at ]\Iarseilles. Illinois, May 13, 1887, 
he was drowned while attempting to rescue 
another member of the party who had fallen 
in the ri\-er. He was highly respected and 
esteemed by all who knew him on accoimt 
of his sterling worth antl true nobility of 
character, and his death was widely and 
deeply mourned. His estimable wife still 
survives him and makes her home in Odell. 



CHARLES R. TOMBAUGH. 

Charles R. Tombaugh, the present counts- 
superintendent of schools, was born near 
AVashington, Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October i, 1862, and is a son of Mat- 
tliias and Elvira J. (Letherman) Tom- 
liaugh, a sketch of whom appears on another 
page of this work. He was about three 
vears old when brought by his parents to 
Livingston comity, Illinois. He began his 
education in the schools of Sunburv town- 



ship, later attended the common cIuk.iIs of 
Odell and then taught school for fi\e win- 
ters in this comity, at the end of which time 
he entered the Northwestern Unixersity at 
Evanston, Illinois. After his return "home 
he resumed teaching and taught for six 
years, during which time -he was principal 
of the East Side School at Dwight, and also 
])rincipal of the schools at Chebanse and 
Odell. While at Odell he was president of 
the Li\'ingston County Teachers' Associa- 
ti<.)n for two years, and also an instructor 
in the County Teachers' Institute. After 
the death of his father, in 1S87, he took 
charge of the home farm and carried it on 
until he assumed the duties of his present 
position as county superintendent of schools. 
He was elected on the Republican ticket, 
and in 1898 was renominated by acclama- 
tion and again elected to that office. The 
educational meetings held during his term 
have been most successful, and he has the 
entire confidence and respect of the people. 

On his election to his present office Pro- 
fessor Tombaugh moved to Ponliac, and 
now has a pleasant home at No. 311 South 
Vermilion street. On the 20th of January, 
1892, he married Mrs. Anna L. Bradrick, 
a daughter of Rev. Samuel Deach, of the 
Central Illinois Methodist Episcopal con- 
ference. Re\-. and Mrs. Deach were in 
Kansas for a time on account of his health, 
and Mrs. Tombaugh was educated in Sa- 
lina, that state. By a former marriage she 
has one child, Margaret L. Bradrick, and 
she has borne our subject three children: 
Alice v., Glen D. and Stella M. 

Professor Tombaugh was ma<le a Ma- 
son in Odell Lodge, No. 401, F. & A. M.. 
in which he served as warden, but has since 
(lemitted to Pontiac lodge. No. 2c)4, where 
he is now sering his fourth year as mas- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



31 



ter. Bcitli he an<l liis wife are acti\e nieiii- 
liers of the Methodist Episcopal cluirdi. and 
lie is now a member of the offical hoard of 
the churcii and president of the Livingston 
County Sunday School Association. While 
a resident uf Dwight. Chehanse and Oilell. 
he was su]ierintendent of the Sunda\- schimls 
there, having like his father devoted much 
time to Sunday school work. He has fol- 
lowed clnsely in the footsteps of his father, 
having held practically all of the local, 
county and cluuxh offices held l>y the latter. 
As a citizen he ever stands ready to dis- 
charge any duty devolving upon him. and 
as an educator he stands dcservcdK- hii;h. 



EMILK A. SIM.MOXS. 

1 he man who achieves success in the le 
gal profession is even more strictly the "ar- 
chitect of his own fortunes" than is the 
average self-made man. there being in the 
keen competition of the lawyer's life, with 
its constantly recurring mental duel be- 
tween eager and determined antagonists, no 
chance fur the operatinn df influences which 
may be called to the aid uf the merchant, the 
manufacturer or the financier, .\mong the 
men of Livingston count\' who ha\e demon- 
strated their abilites in this difficult field 
Emile A. Simmons holds a leading place, 
being one of the jjroiuinent attorneys of 
Pontiac. 

A native of Illinois. Mr. Simmons was 
born in Avon, October 19, 1865, and is a 
son of (ieorge and Charlotte L. J. ( Mail- 
liard ) Simmons. The father was born, 
reared and educated in Hamilton. Madison 
county. Xew York, and as a young man 
removed to .Avon. Illinois, about iS^o. where 



he followed the carpenter's trade, and also 
engaged in farming, making his home there 
until his death. He held different local 
offices, includmg those of justice of the 
])eace, assessor and collector, and was a Re- 
])ublican in jjolitics. having been an aboli- 
tionist in .\'ew N'ork. His father was a 
soldier of the war of iSij. and a life-long 
resident of Hamilton. Xew ^'ork. where he 
followed the occujiation of fariuing. The 
lUiHher of our subject was born in Elor- 
ence, Italv. of French parentage, and was 
reared in I'rance until twelve years of age, 
when she came to America with her family 
and settled in .\vou. Illinois. Her father 
was Ely Mailliard. She is still living, but 
the father of our suliject died in ]Hi)j. 

During his boyhood and youth I'^mile .\. 
Simmons attended the ])ublic schools of 
.\von. and at the age of sixteen commenced 
teaching, .\fter following that profession 
for six years, he became a student at the 
Xormal School in X'ormal, Illinois, and af- 
ter leaving that institution again taught 
school for two years, being princi])al of the 
school at Vermont, Illinois. In December, 
i88q, he came to Pontiac and entered the 
office of A. C. r.all. studying law with him 
two years, and also teaching the latter year. 
The following year he was in the office of 
Mcllduff & Torrance, and in May. 1892, 
was appointed deput\- circuit clerk. While 
in that position seeing the practice of lead- 
ing lawyers was of great benefit to him. In 
August. 1892, he was examined at Mt. \'er- 
non by the judges of tlie appellate court, 
and a certificate issued at the next session of 
the supreme court at that place the follow- 
ing Xovember. In December he left the 
clerk's office and entered the oftice of Mr. 
Mcllduff. remaining with him until .Vugust, 
18(^4. when he o])ened an otiice of his own. 



32 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



He is now successfully engaged in practice 
before all the courts of the state. 

On the 31st of December, 1894, Mr. 
Simmons was united in marriage with Miss 
Katherine M. Smith, of Avon, a daughter 
of P. H. Smith, and to them has been born 
one child, Louise A. They hold member- 
ship in St. Hilary's Catholic church, of Pon- 
tiac, and fraternally Mr. Simmons is a 
member of Crescent Lodge, K. P., is clerk 
of the Camp, I\I. ^\'. A., of Pontiac, and is 
president of the Pontiac Colony Pioneer Re- 
serve Association. He is also director and 
treasurer of associated charities of Pontiac. 
tor some time he has been secretary of the 
Pontiac Loan & Building Association — a 
home loan building concern, whose assets 
amount to one hundred and twelve thou- 
sand dollars. He is also a luember of the 
company. By his ballot he supports the men 
and measures of the Republican part}', and 
takes an active and prominent pait in local 
politics. He still retains an interest in edu- 
cational aitairs, and in April, 1900, was 
elected to the Pontiac township high school 
board. He is also serving his second term 
as a member of the board of directors of the 
Pontiac public library, receiving his appoint- 
ment from the mayor, and as a progressive 
and public-spirited citizen, he takes a deep 
interest in every enterprise calculated to ad- 
A-ance the UKjral, social and educational wel- 
fare of his communitv. 



COLONEL FRAXK L. SMITH. 

Colonel Frank L. Smith, of Governor 
Tanner's staff, is one of the leaders of the 
Republican party in Livingston cnuntv, his 
large acquaintance and unbounded popu- 



larity giving him an influential following, 
while his shrewd judgment of men and af- 
fairs make his counsel of value in all im- 
portant movements. In business circles he 
also takes a foremost rank, his success as a 
real estate dealer being all the more notable 
from the fact that it has been secured by his 
own judicious management. 

This prominent citizen of Dwight, a 
member of the well-known firm of Romber- 
ger & Smith, was born in that citv Xovem- 
ber 24, 1867, and is a son of Jacob J. and 
Jane E. (Ketcham) Smith, natives of Ger- 
many and New York, respectively. The 
father was only four years old when brought 
to America by his parents, who located in 
Pennsylvania, but at the age of fifteen he 
came to Dwight, Illinois, which continued 
to be his home until 1891, when he removed 
to Chicago, where he died in 1894. His 
Avife (lied nine years previous. In their 
family were three children. 

Colonel Smith received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Dwight, and 
at the age of seventeen taught school in 
Round Grove township for about one year, 
after which he accepted a position in the 
freight department of the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad at Dwight, remaining with them ii; 
a clerical capacity about four vears. In 
1887 he went to Chicago and acceiited n 
similar position with the Rock Island Rail- 
road, being located at the Englewood sta- 
tion two years. Subsequently he ser\-ed as 
cashier with P. H. Bolton & Company, c^im- 
mission merchants on South ^^'ater street, 
Chicago, until 1890, when he returned to 
Dwight and entered into partnership with 
W. H. Ketcham in the real estate and loan 
business. W'hen that firm was dissolved 
April I, 1895, Colonel Smith became con- 
nectetl in business with C. L. Roniberoer un- 



THIC BlOGKAPlllCAL KKCURIX 



33 



der the name of Romberger & Sinitli. their 
specialty being real estate and real estate 
work, although they do a private banking 
business for the accommodation of friends 
and acquaintances. Without question the 
firm does one of the largest loan and real es- 
tate businesses in central Illinois, this fact 
being conceded by all other firms in their 
line. At present they are extensively inter- 
ested in Mississippi and Louisiana lands. 
Their holdings in the latter state are tim- 
ber lands, which the firm purchased with the 
view of enhancing their \alue, and in Jan- 
uary, 1900, they sold one tract of twelve 
thousand acres in Madison pari.sh. This is 
desiralile property, being accessible to steam- 
boats and the \'icksburg, Shreveport & Pa- 
cific Railroad. The Mississippi land is in 
the Delta country, and is also covered witii 
hard wood timber, principally oak, pecan and 
gum. When cleared this will become ex- 
cellent cotton land. Besides this property, 
the firm has about fifteen hundred acres of 
fine farming land in Lee county, Illinois, 
which is well improved and under a high 
state of cultivation, and also operate largely 
in Iowa and Indiana lands. 

On the 8th of February. 1893. ^I"". 
Smith was united in marriage with iMiss 
Erminie Ahern, of Dwight, a daughter of 
John and Margaret Ahern. who are at pres- 
ent living in Ogden, L'tah. Mrs. Sniitii is 
a member of St. Patrick's Catholic church, 
of Dwight, and the Colonel belongs to He- 
bron lodge, Xo. j^. K. P., and Dwight 
Camp, iM. W. A. Since attaining his ma- 
jority he has affiliated with the Republican 
party, and has taken a very active and promi- 
nent part in political affairs, always attend- 
ing the county conventions and serving as 
a delegate to the state conventions tiiree 
times. In the spring of 1900 he was offered 



the nomination for state senator on his party 
ticket, but would not accept on account of 
his business interests, though the nonfina- 
tion was equivalent to an election in his dis- 
trict, which is strongly Republican. Early 
in his career he served as city clerk in 
Dwight. but since then he has never been 
prevailed upon to accejH office. In January, 
1897. he was appointed coLmel on Governor 
Tanner's staff, and in that capacity has par- 
ticipated in many important functions, being 
present at the inauguration of President Mc- 
Kinley at Washington. D. C. in March, 
1897: the unveiling of the Grant monument 
at Xew York; the unveiling of Logan's 
monument at Chicago ; the christening of the 
battleship Illinois at Newport Xews, Vir- 
ginia; and the dedication of the Illinois 
iiiniiument at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 



HOX. XELSOX J. MVER. 

There are in every community men 
of great force of character and exceptional 
ability, who by reason of their capacity for 
leadership become recognized as foremost 
citizens, and take a very important i)art in 
public affairs. Such a man is Mr. Myer, 
who is now so efficiently surving as superin- 
tendent of the Livingston county farm in 
Eppards Point township. 

He was born in that townshi[). July 30, 
185 1, and is a son of Judge Eli Myer, who 
was born ami reared in Marvland. and at 
the age of eighteen years moved to Licking 
county, Ohio, locating near Xewark. There 
he married, and continued to make it his 
home until after the birth i^f several of his 
children. In 1850 he came to Livingston 
county, Illinois, and purchased a tract of 
raw laml in Eppards Point township, to 



34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the cultivatiim and iniprdNement o\ whicli 
he at once turned liis attention. Later he 
bought more land and at <Hie time ownetl 
five hundred and sixty acres, which he 
l^laced under a high state of cultixation and 
improved witii a good set of farm l)uilchngs. 
He was a man of good business ab!Hty. and 
was one of tlie most prominent and intluen- 
tial citizens of his community, being called 
upon t(i serve as associate judge, and town- 
ship treasurer and clerk for some years each. 
He died upon the old home place December 
28, 1868. and his wife passed awav June t. 

1875- 

Xelson J. Alyer grew to manhood upon 
the farm and attended the local schols, but 
the knowledge there acquired has been 
greatly supplemented by reading and study 
in later years. Eor some time he and his 
brother operated the old homestead together, 
and in 1875 Air. Aloyer purchased eighty 
acres in sections 21 and 16, on which he 
lived and there made his home until 1895, 
when he took charge of the Li\ingston 
count}- farm. He has been \ery successful 
in the management of this place, and has 
gained an enxiable reputation as one of its 
most efficient superintendents. When he 
took charge of the farm it had fifty-one in- 
mates, but the numlier has since been in- 
creased to eighty-four, which includes a 
number of insane, old and decrepit persons. 
In the management of the place and the 
care of the inmates, he has been greatly as- 
sisted by his estimable wife. 

In this county, December 17, 1S71, Mr. 
Myer married Miss Helen E. McElhiney. 
who was born in Green county. Wisconsin, 
but was reared and educated in Stephenson 
county. Illinois. Her father was James 
McElhiney. To our subject and his wife 
liave been l)orn two children: Xelson D.. 



who is attending the Pontiac High School, 
and James O.. a student in the home school. 
In his political affiliations Mr. Myer is a 
pronounced Republican, and cast his first 
presidential vote for General L'. S. Grant 
in 1872. He has taken a very active and 
prominent part in political affairs, and has 
been electeil to several offices, serving as 
township ct)llector several vears, and was 
justice of the peace f(jr eight \ears from 
1876. In 1 881 he was elected supervisor, 
and filled that office continuously f(.ir ten 
years, during which time he was chairman 
of a numl)er of important committees. He 
was elected to the state legislature in 1888, 
and so acceptably did he fill that office that 
he was re elected for another term, and 
was a member of the committees on state 
instituti(_nis. re\enue and others. In 1893 
he was again elected supervisor, was re- 
elected two years later and made chairman 
of the county board. He resigned that 
office to accejit his present position as su- 
l)erintendent of the county farm. His ofti- 
cial duties have always been discharged with 
a fidelity and promptness worthy of the 
highest commendation, and he is today one 
of the best-known and most popular citizens 
of the county. Religiously both he and his 
wife are members of the Center Methodist 
Episco^jal church. 



CHRISTOPHER W. STERRV. 

Christopher W. Sterry, of Pontiac, was 
l)orn in Somerset county, Maine. August 12, 
iS2b. His father, Samuel Sterry. also a 
nati\e of Maine, was born in 1782, married 
Hannah Harding, in 1807. and served 
through the war of 1812. dying at his home 
in Somerset county in 1827. when Christo- 




C. W. STERRY. 



THE LULK.kAl'HlCAl, KECORI). 



37 



plier was less than one year nld. The pater- 
nal grandfather, David Sterry. was one of 
the heroes of the Revolutionary war, and 
dieil at his iionie in Maine at the advanced 
age of eighty-eight years and eight months. 
The mother, Hannah Harding Sterry, 
\vas a devoted Christian woman. She was 
born in 1788, and died in Maine in 1871, 
when eightv-two years old. At the death 
of her husband she was left with five sons, 
the eiilest less than eighteen years old and 
tlic youngest, Christopiier, not a year old. 
to face the stern realities of life with but 
scant means of supix)rt. The devoted 
mother, after a heroic struggle for several 
years In keep her family of boys together, 
found it necessary to find homes for them. 
1 bus the subject of this sketch, when but 
eight years of age, was placed among 
strangers, where he remained under harsh 
treatment and bard work, and but few op- 
portunities for sciiool privileges for four 
years, when lie could endure it no longer, 
and ran away. When fifteen be worked 
si.x months for twenty-fi\e dollars, and at 
eighteen he went intu Massachusetts and 
commenced wurk at twelve dollars and a 
half per montii on a farm. Then he be- 
came engaged in manufacturing business, 
in which he continued until he came to Illi- 
nois in 1852, and located in Chicago, where 
be remained four years, having charge of the 
stone sawing works of A. S. Sherman & 
Company. In 1856 be was engaged as 
bookkeeper of the Sheffield Mining & Trans- 
portation Company, of Sheffield, Bureau 
county. It was in this year. 1856, that Mr. 
Sterry came into Livingston county and 
settled in Ksmen township, where he bought 
a farm of one lumdred and si.xty acres of 
raw i)rairie land, seven miles north of Pon- 
tiac. This be improved, erecting buildings 



and making of it a jileasant home, on which 
be lived for many years, engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising. During this time be 
added one hundred and seventy acres to 
the homestead, which he still retains in the 
highest degree of cultivation, and became 
jjossessed of large business interests and 
prftperty holdings in Xew Orleans, Louis- 
iana. The latter re(iuired so much atten- 
tion that he left bis farm in 1884 and moved 
into Pontiac. Securing one of the finest lo- 
cations in the city on tlie north bank of pic- 
tures(|ue \'ermillion. Mr. Sterry erected on 
it one of the most elegant modern residences 
in Pontiac. It is located on East Water 
street, in the midst of spacious grounds ex- 
tending back to the river, and is shaded by 
grand old oaks and native forest trees. Here 
be makes his home, though bu.siness as well 
as comfort calls him south during the win- 
ter months. 

Soon after becoming a citizen of Pon- 
tiac, Mr. Sterry became identified with the 
business interests of the city, first by es- 
tablishing the jewelry, drug, book and wall 
paper firm of John S. Murphy & Company. 
.\ little later be was one of the principal or- ' 
ganizers of the Pontiac Slioe Manufactur- 
ing Company, which was incorporated in 
1889, taking one-third of the stock and fur- 
nishing financial backing to a much greater 
extent. He has been a director and presi- 
dent of the company from its organization. 
It is the chief industry of Pontiac, and is 
consi<lered a prime factor in itsprosperityand 
growth. Starting up in October, 1889, it 
has grown to a capacity of two thousand 
pairs of shoes per day, and furnishes em- 
jiloyment to three hundred men and women, 
the majority of whom are skilleil workmen. 
The product of the factory is disposed of 
throughout the territory from Ohio to the 



38 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Pacific coast on tlie west and the Gulf of 
Mexico on the south. 

In 1897 Mr. Sterry purchased Ri\-erside 
Park, adjoining the city on the east, and 
almost encircled by the \'erniilliim river. 
shaded by stately native forest trees, thus 
securing- its use for the Pontiac Chautauqua 
Association, which he assisted in organizing, 
and in which he was the largest stockholder. 
He is also largely interested in the Pontiac 
State Bank, of which he has been director 
and \ice-president since its organization. 
\Miile he does not give special attention to 
the details of this business, yet the mere 
fact of his connection with its has served 
to increase the confidence of the business 
community in its conservative management. 
He is also president and largest stockholder 
of the Riverside Irrigation Company, of 
Idaho, which controls some fifteen thousand 
acres of arable land in that state. About 
thirtv miles of canal have been constructed 
and is in operation for irrigation purposes. 
In 1899 he erected the four-story office 
building on the southwest corner of Court 
House square. It is known as the Sterry 
block, and will tloubtless be a landmark for 
years to come as its equal has not appeared 
in any city the size of Pontiac. It fronts 
eiglity feet on Washington street and one 
hundred feet on South Mill street, and is 
four stories above the basement. It con- 
sists of two stores and the Pontiac Stale 
Bank lielnw. and of sixty suites of offices 
a!)o\e, which are made accessible by an elec- 
tric-power passenger elevator, heated In- 
steam and supplied with city water and with 
electric lighting. 

As a citizen Mr. Sterry has ever been 
ready to accept the responsibilities and per- 
form his duty in the most conscientious way. 
\\'hile as a matter of choice he would ha\-e 



avoided the cares of public office, yet he has 
served many years in various official posi- 
tions. In Esmen township he served as 
school director, trustee, school treasurer, 
justice of the peace and supervisor. He was 
a member of the board of supervisors of 
Livingston county for several terms, and 
as such, aided in securing the location of 
the State Reform School at Pontiac. 

Having been a strong advocate of anti- 
slavery principles even as an abolitionist, on 
the organization of the new part}-, he be- 
came a stanch Republican, and during the 
war of the Rebellon was an active member 
of the Union League. He continued to 
act with the jiartx- until the old issues were 
settled, and he became convinced that the 
new and greater issue of temperance could 
expect no real support from the old party. 
He then gave the Prohibition party his lib- 
eral support and became an ardent supporter 
of that party. 

Realizing in his own life \\-hat he missed 
through want of school privileges, he has 
been an ardent supporter of the public school 
system and also of higher education. He 
has been a supporter especiallv of Xew Or- 
leans L'niversity, of which he is a trustee, of 
^\'heaton College, and of Illinois \\'esleyan 
L'niversity. 

In 1847 -^^1'- Sterry was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Day, who lived with him seven 
years, bearing to him three children, all of 
whom died in infancy, while her death oc- 
curred March 25, 1855. 

In 1858 he married iVIiss Amanda Had- 
lev. daughter of the late James P. Hadley, a 
prominent farmer of Sunbury township, 
this county. One child was born, and lived 
but a short time, and the wife also was taken 
awav after a union of a little more than one 
vear. In 1861 he was united in marriage 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



39 



with Mrs. Mary C. Beeler.a (laughter of Jolin 
Ross, of Sangamon county, and she has 
been spared to hve with him until tlie pres- 
ent time. To them have been born six 
children : Lida, wife of Dr. C. H. Long, of 
Pontiac, whose sketch appears elsewhere in 
this volume; John L., the only son, a young 
man of great promise who died at the ai^o of 
twenty years, in 1884, while attending the 
Illinois W'esleyan University at Blooming- 
ton, where he was preparing himself for the 
ministry ; Hattie and Josephine, who both 
died in infancy; Mary E., wife of E. M. 
Kirkpatrick, a prominent grain merchant of 
Chenoa, Illinois; and Jessie, wife of Clar- 
ence B. Hurtt, now a resident of Roswell, 
Idaho, where he is serving as secretary of 
the Riverside Irrigation Company. They 
have also four grandchildren, Christopher 
Sterry Long, Mary Catherine Long. John 
Nelson Hurtt and Baby Hurtt. 

Mr. Sterry early identified himself witii 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and for 
many years has served in official capacity as 
steward, trustee and Sunday school super- 
intendent. \\'hile in Esmen he was instru- 
mental in securing the erection of the Es- 
men Center church. On moving to Pon- 
tiac he was immediately chosen as a trustee 
of the First Methodist Episcopal church, 
and on the destruction of the old church by 
fire in 1885. he aided in the building of the 
present church edifice. He is president of 
the board of trustees, having held that office 
for a number of years. 

For almost half a century Mr. Sterry 
has been a resident of Livingston county. 
On his arrival here the greater part of its 
rich land was yet unbroken, its inhabitants 
were few in number, widely scattered and 
the improvements were not of the best. He 
lias certainly done well his part. Thor- 



oughly honest and conscientious in all he 
does, he has won the respect and confidence 
of all with whom he has been brought in 
contact, and his lifework is worthy of emu- 
lation bv the generations to follow. 



CAPT.MX S1L.\S MILTOX WITT. 

Captain Silas Milton Witt, an honored 
veteran of the civil war and a prominent 
resident of Pontiac, Illinois, who is now liv- 
ing a retired life, was born in Lebanon, 
Boone county, Indiana, February 1, 1842, 
and is a son of Michael and Lohama (Wall) 
Witt, the former a native of Guilford coun- 
ty. North Carolina, of which state his fa- 
ther, a soldier of the Revolutionary war, 
was an early settler. The maternal grand- 
father,. Elisha Wall, also fought for the in- 
dependence of the colonies. He was a 
relative of Daniel Boone, who was a fre- 
(luent visitor at his home, and they often 
hunted and trapped together. Later Mr. 
Wall went with Boone and a number of 
others to Kentucky, becoming pioneers of 
that state. 

Michael Witt, our subject's father, grew 
to manhood on the home farm in his native 
state, and from there entered the service of 
his country during the war of 1812, serv- 
ing as captain of a company. Later he 
was commissioned colonel in the North 
Carolina militia, and after his removal to 
Indiana was an officer in the state militia 
there. Our subject well remembers seeing 
him on horseback on general training days, 
which at that time were the important days 
Lif the year. Soon after his marriage Mi- 
chael Witt and his wife removed to the ter- 
ritory of Indiana, and she was the first white 
woman to locate in Leljanon, the countv 



40 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



seat of Bi)one county. Tliere lie engaged in 
farming for a time, and after the town was 
started opened out an old fashioned general 
store, liaiding his goods first from Cincinnati 
and later from IndianapoHs and Lafayette. 
He became one of the successful men of 
that locality, owning large tracts of land, 
and part of the town of Lebanon was built 
on the first three hundred and twenty acres 
Avhich he purcha.'^ed. He held much of this 
property until his death, the land later be- 
coming \-ery \-aluable. As a ^^'hig he took 
quite an active and prominent part in local 
politics, and held a number of offices, in- 
cluding those of county judge and coroner. 
He left the south on account of slavery, 
and also because he believed that men of 
moderate means could do better in the north. 
Both he and his wife are devout members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his 
home was always the stopping place for the 
ministers. His first house in Lebanon was a 
sort of hotel for traxelers journeying be- 
tween Lafayette and Cincinnati, and in those 
days he was tlic man of the town. He died 
' there March 2, 1861, and was buried the 
day President Lincoln was first inaugurated. 
Our subject's mother died in Dwight, this 
county, in 1874. They left a family of six- 
teen children, of whom our subject is the 
youngest. Both had been marriett before, 
the mother's first husband lieing a Mr. 
Blair, of Kentuck}-. 

Captain Witt recei\ed a good practical 
education in the schools of Lebanon, and 
aided his father in the work of the farm 
and store until the civil war broke out. On 
the night of the surrender of Fort Sumter, 
April 13. 1861, he enlisted f(ir three months 
as a private in Company 1, Tenth Indiana 
\ olunteer Infantry, at the president's first 
call for se\entv-fi\'e thousand men. Thev 



joined (ieneral McClelland in West \'ir- 
ginia, and with him participated in the bat- 
tle of Rich Mountain, July 11, which was 
followed by the engagement at Phillippi 
Tunnel Hill. When his term of enlistment 
expired, Captain Witt returned home and 
was made recruiting officer at Lebanon, 
where he helpeil recruit the Tenth, Fortieth, 
Eighty-sixth and One Hundred and Six- 
teenth Indiana Regiments, raising two ct)m- 
panies for the Eighty-sixth. In the spring 
of 1863 he enlisted as orderly sergeant in 
Company G, One Hundred and Sixteenth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was first 
ordered to Dearborn, Michigan, to guard the 
arsenal there during the time of the Vallan- 
dingham trouble. Crossing the lake to 
Clexeland. he proceeded to Camp Nelson. 
Kentucky, where he joined his brigade, and 
later was through the east Tennessee and 
Knoxville campaign, capturing Cumberland 
Cap the last time. This was followed by the 
siege of Knox\ille and the engagement at 
Walker's Ford and Tazewell, Tennessee, 
where his regiment was on the extreme left 
of Burnside's army. In March, 1864, he 
was mustered out and appointed deputy 
provost marshal with headquarters at La- 
fayette, Indiana, where he helped the deputy 
proxost marshal organize a regiment, then 
went to Indianapolis, where he secured 
arms and ammunition and started in pursuit 
of Morgan. He spent sixty days on this 
expedition, and assisted in capturing some 
of Morgan's forces at Mt. Vernon. When 
the president called for troops to push the 
Atlanta campaign, he helped organize Com- 
pany E, One Hundred and Thirtv-fifth In- 
diana \^olunteer Infantry and was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant. They were on 
duty in Kentucky, Alabama and North Caro- 
lina, and participated in the battle of Look- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



41 



out Mountain. Captain Witt was always 
with liis regiment with tlie exception of 
three days when ill with fever after the hat- 
tie of Tazewell, hut was never in the hos- 
pital. After lieing mustered out in the fall 
of 1864 he returned to Lehanon. Indiana. 

.\t Lebanon Captain Witt was married, 
November 10, 1864, to Miss Maria L. Lan- 
don, a daughter of Myron and Martha 
( Jeffers) Landon. Her father removed 
from Ohio to Indiana at an early day, and 
was one of the first teachers in his locality. 
He was a prominent Mason. He died when 
Mrs. Witt was only a year old and her 
mother died two years later. Their eldest 
siin, Albert Landon, was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Humane Society, of Chicago, and 
was the publisher of the Humane Journal 
until his death, a period of over thirty years. 
Mrs. Witt spent her early life in Shelbyville, 
Indianapolis and Lebanon, Indiana. To 
the captain and his wife were born three 
children, namely: Hattie A., now the wife 
of L. S. Baldwin, of Xoblesville. Indiana; 
Jessie M., wife of Philip Piper, a dentist of 
Pontiac: and Albert M.. at home, who has 
been a member of the National Guard for 
three years, and served as corporal in Com- 
l)any I', Third Illinois \"olunteer Infantry, 
during the Spanish-American war. 

On the 13th of November, 1864. Cap- 
tain Witt removed to Dwight. Illinois, 
w here he engaged in the real estate business 
one year, dealing first in farm and later in 
\illage property. In 1866 he was appointed 
marshal of that town, and held the office 
thirteen years; was also deputy sheriff ten 
years and constable nineteen years. Fur a 
}ear and a half he engaged in the harness 
business, but at length was forced to give it 
u]) as his various official duties re(|uired his 
entire time. At the same time he als j held 



other local offices, such as school director, 
street commissioner, and was fire marshal 
fourteen years. As a Republican he has 
always taken an acti\e part in political af- 
fairs. In 1866 on the first organization of 
the (irand .\rmy Po.st at Dwight. under the 
oUl dispensation Captain Witt became one 
of the charter members, but the organiza- 
tion afterward went down. Since 1880 he 
has been a member of T. Lyle Dickey Post, 
of Pontiac, of which he is now past com- 
mander, and which he has represented in 
the state encampment, and was also elected 
U} represent his district to the national en- 
campment at Chicago in the fall of 1900. 
He was a member of Dwight Lodge, I. O. O. 
!•'., antl admitted to Pontiac Lodge, No. 
ji^j. in which he has filled all the chairs. He 
is also a member of the encampment, anil 
was the organizer and cai)tain of the Canton 
for three years. lH)r many years he was 
an active member of the Independent Order 
of Good Templars, and was an officer in the 
same until the lodge disbanded. 

Tor ten years Captain Witt was a mem- 
ber of the Illinois National Guard, and rose 
from second lieutenant to captain of his 
company, thus gaining his title. During the 
strike of 1877 he was in active service with 
his company for three months, being sta- 
tioned at Braid wood. After his election 
to the office of sheriff he had to disband the 
company as his men refused to elect another 
captain, so well was he loved by them, and 
he was given permission to disband them 
by Governor Cullom. 

It was in 1882 that Captain Witt was 
elected sheriff of Livingston county, which 
office he filled for four years with credit to 
him.self and satisfaction to his constituents. 
.\t one time he had thirty-two prisouers in 
the jail. Later he was appointed an officer 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ill the Illinois State Refurmatory under Dr. 
Scouller, but resigned after holding the po- 
sition for two years and four months, and 
returned to Dwight, Avhere he was engaged 
ill business for a year and a half. Subse- 
quently he conducted a bakery in Pontiac, 
but is now living retired, enjoying a well 
earned rest. His beautiful home at No. 603 
AVest Grove street, is pleasantly located on 
the banks of the \'ermilion river in what is 
now the best portion of the city, and the 
lawn and garden surrounding it co\er one 
acre of ground. The Captain and his wife 
are leading members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of Pontiac, and are highly re- 
spected and esteemed by all who know 
them, while their circle of friends through- 
out the countv is extensive. 



\\ILLIAM KIMBER. 

William Kimber, a thorough and skill- 
ful farmer residing on section 10, Esmen 
township, Livingston county, six m.les west 
of Odell, was born near the city of London, 
England, October 10, 1853, a son of Jesse 
and Alice (Hacket) Kimber, natives of the 
same country. In 1873 he crossed the 
broad Atlantic with his parents, and on land- 
ing in Xew York proceeded at once to La 
Salle county, Illinois, where his brother 
and sister had located four years previously. 
There the father rented land and engaged 
in farming for several years, but finally 
came to Livingston county and spent his last 
days on a farm in Esmen township with our 
subject, dying here May 11, 1885. The 
wife and mother departed this life October 
19, 1883, ^"d both were laid to rest in Es- 
men township cemetery. In their familv 



were tliree children : Mar\-, wife of Samuel 
Mills, of Grundy county ; Percival, a farmer 
of Esmen township, Livingston county; and 
\\'illiam. 

Our sul)ject was given good educational 
advantages in his native land. On the emi- 
gration of the familv to America, he assisted 
his parents and worked as a farm hand by 
the month for six years. He was married 
in De Kalb county. January i, 1880, to Miss 
Caroline Rose Tomlin, a native of Adams 
township, La Salle county. Her father, 
James Tomlin, was born in England, and 
came to America in 1 842 when a young man, 
and located in Illinois. To Mr. ajid Mrs. 
Kimlier were born seven children, namely: 
Bertha Alay. now the wife of Henry War- 
ner, of La Salle county ; Jesse Arthur, Ella 
Alice, Edward James, Dora Ann, Caroline 
Eliza and William Andrew, all at home. 

For ti\e years after his marriage Mr. 
Kimber operated a rented farm adjoining 
liis present place, and in 1884 bought eighty 
acres where he now resides, but did not lo- 
cate thereon until a year later, though he 
had engaged in its cultivation for two years. 
To the original purchase he has since added 
a forty-acre tract, and now has a fine farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres which he 
has placed under a high state of cultivation 
and impro\ed with good and substantial 
buildings. He is an industrious, enterpris- 
ing and progressi^•e man, and to these char- 
acteristics ma}^ be attributed his success, 
for he received no outside aid. 

By his ballot Mr. Kimber supports the 
men and measures of the Prohibition party, 
and he served one term as a member of the 
school board, but has never cared for offi- 
cial honors. Religiously both he and his 
wife are earnest and faithful members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church at Esmen 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



43 



Center, of which he is a trustee. In the 
Sunday school he lias servetl se\eral \ears 
as superintendent. 



WILLI. \.M W. W.VSSU.M. 

W illiani W. W'assoni is one of Pontiac's 
highly respected citizens, wliose useful and 
well-spent life has not only _q;ained for him 
the confidence of his fellow men. hut has 
also secured for him a comfMrtahle compe- 
tence which enahles him lo lay aside al! 
business cares and live retired. .\ native of 
Illinois, he was born in Spring Valley, Bu- 
reau county, December i, 1848, ar.d is a son 
of Jacob and Jane (Scott) Wassom. The 
fatiier was born in Pennsylvania, but when 
a small boy accompanied his parents on their 
removal to lennessee, where he was reared, 
and as a young man came to this state, lo- 
cating in Bureau county. There he was 
married, and subsequently removed to Bur- 
lington, Iowa, where he purchased a farm 
and successfuU)' engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock-raising, where he remained 
seven years. Then returning lo Bureau 
county he purchased a farm on the site of 
the present village of Spring Valley. He 
was a prominent man in his community and 
took an active interest in the early schools. 
He died there August 25, 1879. The wife 
and mother died when our subject was only 
four years old. Both were earnest mem- 
bers of the Metliodi.st Episcopal church. She 
was a native of Virginia, and a daugiiter of 
Robert Scott, of Scotch descent, who was 
one of the earliest settlers and most pros- 
perous farmers of P)ureau county. He 
manufactured the Ijrick of wliich his house 
was constructed, and that building is still 



standing, lie was i)robal)ly the tirst nianu- 
facturer of brick in that comity. 

\\ ilhaiii W. Wassom was educated in the 
schoo.s oi ilall townsmp, and remained 
With hiS lather untd cum.ng to Luiiigston 
county m 18O8, when he took up his resi- 
dence ill Nevada township. \\ liile living 
there he was marrietl, June J9, 1871, to 
iNliss Hannah Sharp, a native of Farm 
Ridge, Illinois, and a daughter of George 
and Catherine (SpenceJ Sharp. Her father 
was born m Ireland of English parentage, 
be.ng a son ot Aohle bliarp, who never em.- 
graied to America. George Sharp was 
married in Ireland, and later crossed the At- 
lantic to Toronto, Canada, whence he re- 
moved to Farm Kidge, Illino.s. Subse- 
quently he took up his residence in Dwight, 
and laier upon a tarm in Nevada township, 
this couiiiy. He was highly respected and 
was called ujion to fill different township 
offices. Mr. and Mrs. Wassom have a fam- 
ily (if six children, namel\' : Jacob, a resi- 
dent of Marengo, Iowa; Chaiies Bert, who 
is living on the Blackstone farm, in Sun- 
bury township; Fannie, who married Ev- 
erett Ferguson, of Saunemin, this county, 
and has two children, Laurine and Lela; 
.\(la, who resides at home and is success- 
fully engaged in teaching in the schools of 
this county ; George, who was graduated 
from the I'ontiac Higli School in 1900; and 
Catherine, who is still attending the high 
scIk.ioI. 

On locating in this county, Mr. Wassom 
found C(Jiisiderable wikl game and much of 
the land was still in its jirimitive condition. 
He purchased eighty acres of raw' prairie 
in Nevada township, which he at once com- 
menced to break, fence and improve. Pros- 
])ering in his new home, he purciiased more 
land until he owneil five eighty acre tracts, 



44 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



which he tik'il and put in first class condi- 
tioii, making one of tiie best improved 
farms in the township. He also owned an- 
other eighty-acre tract in Sunbury town- 
ship, and in connection with the operation 
of his land was engaged in stock raising. 
He always kept a giiod grade and had con- 
siderable registered stock on hand, being 
among the first to introduce it. In 1895 he 
moved to Pontiac and bought a pleasant 
home at No. 608 North Mill street, where he 
lias since lived retired. 

Politically Mr. W'assom has always been 
identified with the Republican party, but 
has never held office, his home being in a 
strong Democratic township where his party 
could get nothing that the Democrats would 
take. He \vas an efiicient member of the 
school board for some time, and helped to 
erect the school buildings in his township. 
He and his wife are acti\-e members of the 
Methodist Episcopal .church, and while liv- 
ing in the country he served as superintend- 
ent of the Sunday school one year and took 
a leading part in church work, filling all of 
the different official positions. He was a 
member of the building committee when the 
church was erected in Nevaila in 1873, and 
hauled the first load of stone for. its founda- 
tion. He is now ciinnected with the church 
in Pontiac. \\'here\er known he is held in 
high regard, and justly merits the confi- 
dence and esteem of his fellow citizens. 



HON. ROBERT R. WALLACE. 

In the legal profession, which embraces 
some of the finest minds in the nation, it is 
difficult to win a name and place of promi- 
nence. In commercial life one mav start 



out on a more advanced plane than otliers; 
he may enter into a business already estab- 
lished and carry it further forward, but in 
the legal profession one must commence at 
the beginning and work his way upward by 
ability, gaining his reputation and success by 
merit. People do not place their legal busi- 
ness in unskilled hands, and those who to-day 
siand at the head of their profession, must 
-merit their position. Among the most promi- 
nent lawyers of Livingston county is Robert 
R. Wallace, of Pontiac, who served as coun- 
ty judge for the long period of twenty-one 
years. 

'i he Judge was born in Belmont county, 
Ohio, March 13, 1835, a son of David and 
Prances (Ross) Wallace. His paternal 
grantl father was David \Vallace, who came 
to this country from the north of Ireland 
and was a strong United Presbyterian in re- 
ligious belief. The maternal grandfather, 
Robert Ross, was of Scotch descent, and also 
a stanch member of the United Presbyterian 
church. The Judge's father was born in 
western Pennsylvania, and reared there and 
in eastern Ohio, while the mother was born 
near Chambersburg. in eastern Pennsylvania, 
and when young remo\ed to the western 
part of that state. During his active life 
Da\id Wallace engaged in farming in Bel- 
mont and (iuernse)- counties, Ohio, and in 
1869 came to Illinois, locating near Biggs- 
\ille, Henderson county, where he continued 
to engage in agricultural pursuits until his 
death in 1875. His wife still survives him 
aiid is now living with a daughter in Kansas 
at the age of ninety-one years. 

During his boyhood Judge Wallace at- 
tended the common schools of liis nati\e 
county and completed his education at Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, where he received the de- 
.grees of A. E. and .\. M. and was graduated 




R. R. WALLACE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



47 



^vith the class of 1861. In Deceniher oi 
tiiat year he responded to his country's call 
for troops, enlisting in Company K, Seventy- 
fourth Ohio \'olunteer Infantry. He was 
first sent to Xenia, Ohio, and from tiiere to 
Camp Chase, Columhus, where he was en- 
gaged in guarding prisoners for a time, and 
later with the .\rniy of the CumberlantI he 
participated in all the battles from Nashville 
to Atlanta, and after the fall of the latter 
city took part in the defense of Nashville. 
Later he was on post duty near there and 
^^lemphis until the close of his term of enlist- 
ment. He had re-enlisted in the same regi- 
ment and was promoted to captain during 
the summer oi 1864, remaining in the ser- 
vice until 1866. 

Judge Wallace had previously com- 
menced the study of law, and after the war 
continued his studies at Ottawa, Illinois, 
being admitted to the bar in April, 18&7. 
\n the fall of that year he located in Chats- 
worth, Livingston county, where he was en- 
gaged in general practice until his remoxal 
to Pontiac in the spring of 1874, having the 
previous fall been elected county judge on 
what was known as the anti-monopoly ticket. 
He took the office in December, 1873, and 
held it live consecutive terms — a longer 
period than other county officer has been 
retained in one position. This fact clearly 
indicates his efficiency, popularity and fidelity 
to duty. During all this time he continued 
to engage in active practice, and is to-day 
one of the leading general practitioners of 
the county. He is an honored member of 
T. Lyie Dickey Post, G. A. R., and is past 
commander of the same. 

On the 3d of June, 1867, Judge Wal- 
lace was united in marriage with Miss C. 
Louise Strawn, a daughter of Isaiah and 
Elizabeth (Champlain) Strawn, of Ottawa, 



Illinois, and to them were born four chil- 
dren : Ross S., now chief engineer of the 
People's Gas & Electric Company, of Peoria ; 
Francis; Lucile, and Grace, a teacher in the 
schools of Joliet. The family have a pleas- 
ant home at No. 303 East Howard street, 
and are prominent members of the Presby- 
terian church of Pontiac. 



MILLER HOTALIXG. 

Miller Hotaling, a successful farmer and 
land owner on section 31, Avoca township, 
and a resident of Livingston county since 
1876, was born in Greene county, New 
"^'ork, July 30, 1850, and is a son of Rich- 
ard and Helen (Miller) Hcjtaling, both na- 
tives of that state and of German descent. 
The father died in New York in 1882, where 
he had followed farming since early man- 
hood. His wife survives him and lives on 
the old Miller homestead, which was occupi- 
ed by her father for sixty years, never pass- 
ing out of the family. She is now seventy- 
three years of age, and has always been act- 
We. Our sul)ject's jiaternal grandfather 
served as lieutenant through the war of 181 2. 
The family were formerly Whigs, and upon 
the formation of the Republican party joined 
its ranks. To Richard Hotaling and wife 
were born eight children, five of whom are 
still living, namely: Annie, wife of John 
Jacobs, of Hazelton, Pennsylvania; Augusta, 
wife of Harry Herr, of Athens, New York; 
William, who lives with his mother on the 
old Miller homestead; Van Allen, a pros- 
])erous farmer and lantl owner of Livingston 
county, Illinois; and Miller, the subject of 
this sketch. Jacob, the oldest son, was a 
member of the Seventh New York /Artillery 



48 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



(luring tlie ci\i! war, was taken prisoner and 
sent til Andersonville. where he was incar- 
cerated twent\'-tw() months before ex- 
clianged. and contracted cHsease from which 
he died in 1865, just as he was released. 

Miller Hotaling received a common 
school education in his native state ami 
grew to manhood on his father's farm. On 
leaving the parental roof at the age of seven- 
teen years he came to Illinois and worked 
as a farm hand for two years in McLean 
countv. at the end of which time he rented 
a farm anil carried on farming (juite suc- 
cessfully in that way for a numlier of years. 
In 1885 he purchased fifty acres of rich and 
arable land on section 31, Avoca tow^nship, 
Livingston county, and has since engaged 
i." general farming here with marked suc- 
cess. He has added to the original pur- 
chase another fifty-acre tract; has matle 
many valuable improvements on the place 
and to-day has a most desirable farm. He 
gives his entire time and attention to the 
improvement and culti\ation of his land. 

Li 1874 ]\Ir. Hotaling was united in 
marriage with Miss Flora Pulsipher, a na- 
tive of Oneida. Knox county, Illinois, and 
to them were born four children : Lewis, 
who graduated at Eureka College and is 
now a Christian minister at Kentland, In- 
diana ; P'hilip. who was graduated at the 
same institution, and is now assisting his fa- 
ther on the farm ; Leah and Cliloe, who 
are both at home. The wife and mother 
■died at their home in Avoca township in 
1887, and in 1890 ^Ir. Hotaling married 
Miss Alartha Van Wormer, a nati\e of 
Brimfield. Peoria county, by whom he has 
three children, Edna, Millie and Leola. 2\Iis. 
Hotaling is a daughter of \\'illiam and Mar- 
tha (Shepherd) Van \\'ormer, her father 
bein"- a veteran of theCi\'il war. anil w ho for 



years was engaged in farming. F]oth he 
anil his wife are yet living, and are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

As a Republican Mr. Hotaling has al- 
ways been an active worker in the interests of 
his party, and has held several minor offices 
in the township, faithfully fulfilling every 
trust reposed in him. In 1899 he was 
electeil supervisor. He has been a school 
dn-ector fifteen years, always taking a stand 
for good schools and teachers. Re- 
ligiously he is a member of the Christian 
church, in which he is serving as elder, and 
socially is a member of the Court of Honor 
of Fairbury. He is a man of rather un- 
pretentious nature, but is well liked by all 
who know him. Mrs. Hotaling is also a 
member of the Christian church. 



HENRY C. JONES. 

Henry C. Jones, a well-known citizen of 
Pontiac. Illinois, was born in Cicero, Ham- 
ilton county, Indiana, February 11, 1838, a 
son of Henr}" Jones, who was born near 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where during his youth 
he learned the blacksmith's traile. When 
a young man he removed to Cicero, Indiana, 
and turned his attention to mercantile busi- 
ness. Here he married Emily De Moss, a 
daughter of James De Moss, a French Hu- 
guenot and a carpenter by trade, who passed 
his last da_\s as a farmr in Livingston 
ciiunt}'. Illinois. The parents of our subject 
came to this county in 1845, but after a 
short time spent here they removed to the ter- 
ritory of Iowa, locating at Bellevue, where 
our subject began his education. In 1847 
the family returned to this county, and after 
following: farminq; for a short time the fa- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



49 



ther. in 1849, went to California, where for 
several year.s lie was engag^ed in mining and 
mercantile pursuits. Re turning to Pontiac 
in 1855 he again engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness here, and was, in 1857, elected county 
judge. In 1859. resigning his office of coun- 
t\' judge here, he returned to the Pacific 
slope in company with our subject and fif- 
teen young men. He engaged in mercantile 
business in Shasta, California, and became 
one of the most prominent and prosperous 
men of that place. He was elected a member 
of the board of supervisors, and was also 
alcalde( or mayor) of Shasta. In connec- 
tion with his other business he was (juite 
extensively engaged in gold mining. He 
did much to build up the town and was rec- 
ognized as one of its most influential and 
prominent citizens. After the Civil war 
he supported the Republican party and took 
a leading part in public affairs. He died in 
Shasta in 1893, and the mother of our sub- 
ject died in the same place in 1868, leaving 
ti\e chiklren. of whom Henry C. was third 
in onler of birth. 

During his boyhood our subject attended 
the public sdiools of Pontiac, and when his 
education was completed clerked in his fa- 
ther's store until going to California in 1859. 
They made the trip overland with horseless 
vehicles (o.k teams) and were six months 
upon the way. They passed through St. 
Joseph, Missouri, went up the Platte when 
the Indians in that region were quite hostile, 
and passed through what is now Ogden, 
Ctah, and through Nevada. Arriving at 
Shasta. California, which was a good min- 
ing town, father and son opened a store and 
as merchants soon built up a good trade. 
For some vears they were interested in 
])lacer and later in quartz mining. Our sub- 
iect continued in business with his father 



until i8()4. when he enlisted in the volun- 
teer service and was elected lieutenant of his 
company, but when they were put in bar- 
racks and the regulars sent to the front, he 
resigned, 'l hat he might see some active 
service he went, X'ia Panama, to \ew York 
with the intention of enlisting there, but 
the war ended before he found the opi)or- 
lunity. 

Returning to Livingston county, Illinois, 
.Mr. Jones entered the newspaper field, and 
with Mr. Renoe established the Eree Press 
at Pontiac. Later he bought the Sentinel, 
the oldest newspa[)er in the county, from 
James Stout, and. consolidating the two, 
published a paper known as the Sentinel and 
Press. Mr. Renoe was a Democrat, while 
he was a Republican, but Mr. Renoe later 
withdrew, leaving Mr. Jones as sole editor 
and proprietor, and the paper resumed its 
old name as Sentinel. He continued the 
publication of the Sentinel for nine years, 
during which time he built up a good cir- 
culation and made it the leading Republi- 
can j)aper in the county. Selling out in 
1875, he went to Texas, and engaged 
jn the au.xiliary newspaper business in Dallas, 
getting out patent insides. In this enter- 
prise he was remarkably successful, having 
a list of two hundred and sixty-two local 
]japers to supply. He also published the 
Planter and Farmer, and in that undertaking 
was also successful, but on account of the 
ill health of his wife, he disposed of his in- 
terests in Texas and removed to Santa Cruz, 
California, where he owns a valuable prune 
ranch. 

In 1S9J Mr. Jones returned to Pontiac 
and acipiired a three-fifths interest in the 
electric light plant, having helped to develop 
the enterprise. This company was incor- 
porated as the Pontiac Light, Heat & Power 



so 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Company, and has grown to large propor- 
tions. Mr. Jones ser\-e(l as its president for 
seven vears, though he recently sold his 
interest in the same. He has been a tax- 
payer in Pontiac for over thirty years and 
is recognized as one of her most progressive 
citizens, giving his support to those objects 
■which he believes will prote of public bene- 
fit. Socially he is a member of the Pontiac 
Lodge, Xo. 294, F. & A. j\I. 

On the 25th of September, 1873, ^^i'- 
Jones was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary A. Bancroft, a native of New York, 
and a daughter of Luther Bancroft, of Pon- 
tiac. They have one daughter, Nellie A.. 
\vh(j with her mother is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Pontiac. 



LUTHER C. HAYS. 

Luther C. Hays, a practical and enter- 
prising agriculturist of Eppards Point town- 
ship, owns and operates two hundred and 
fifty acres of land on section 2,2, constitut- 
ing a valuable and highly improved farm, 
pleasantly located nine miles south of Pon-. 
tiac and three and a half miles northeast 
of Chenoa. His possessions have been ac- 
quired through his own efiforts, and as the 
result of his consecutive endeavor he has 
won a ]:Iace among the substantial citizens of 
his community. 

]\Ir. Havs was born in Brown county, 
Ohio. July 27, 1836, and is descended from 
an old Connecticut family of Scotch-Irish 
origin. His great-grandfather, Celia Hays, 
was a native of that state and a pioneer of 
Pennsylvania. He was a soldier of the 
Revolutionary war. while the grandfather, 
Warren Hays, aided in the defense of his 
countrv during the war of 181 2. The lat- 



ter was born in Pennsylvania, and married 
a Miss Stark, a cousin of Rev. Lorenzo Dow. 
Abiel Hays, father of our subject, was bnrn 
in New York, in 1813, and from that state 
remo\ed to Kentucky and later to Brown 
county, Ohio, where in the midst of the for- 
est he cleared and improved a farm. There 
he wedded Mary Kennedy, a native of Vir- 
ginia, and a daughter of James and Mar- 
garet Kennedy. In 1855 he brought his 
family to Illinois, driving across the coun- 
try- with an ox team and locating first in 
\\'oodford county, but a year later he re- . 
moved to Chenoa township, ^iIcLean countv, 
where he bought land and improved a farm, 
making his home there for some years. He 
helped organize that township, which was 
l)reviously only a voting precinct. His last 
days were spent upon a farm in southern 
Illinois, where he died in 1890, at the ripe 
old age of seventy-seven years, and his wife 
died in 1884, at the age of sixty-nine years. 
Our subject is the oldest of their family of. 
seven children, two sons and fi\-e daughters, 
all of whom reached years of maturity, the 
others being as follows: Arminda J., de- 
ceased wife of E. C. Hyde; Clarissa A., who 
married John G. Dodge and died in 1898; 
Ellen, deceased wife of Elijah Cole ; I^Iinerva 
E., wife of A. D. Polk, of Minneapolis, I\Iin- 
nesota; Eva, who died when a young lady, 
and Thomas J., a resident of San Diego, 
California. 

Luther C. Hays was a young man of 
nineteen years on the remo\'al of the family 
t" this state, and he aided his father in open- 
ing up and developing the farm in McLean 
county, remaining with him until his mar- 
riage. He was educated in common and se- 
lect schools of his native state. \\'ith the 
exception of the oldest, all his sisters engaged 
in teaching school in McLean county. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



51 



In CIiica,s^<i. Illinois, Septenil)er 26. i860. 
Mr. Hays married Miss Matilda Eraser, a 
native of Canada and a daughter of Louis 
and Mary Eraser, who were born in that 
country of Erench ancestry, and removed 
to Chicago during the childhood of Mrs. 
Hays. They began their domestic life upon 
a farm of forty acres in McLean county, to 
which our subject added until he had one 
hundred and twenty acres. Jlc continued 
to operate that farm until 1888, when he 
l)urchased the two-hundred-and-fifty-acre 
tract of land in Eppards Point township. 
Livingston county, where he now resides. 
It was known as the 'Stiuire Payne farm, 
being entered by him in 1852. Since tak- 
ing possession of this place, Mr. Hays has 
remodeled the residence, built a good barn, 
set out fruit and ornamental trees, and made 
many other improvements which add greatly 
to its value and attractive appearance. 

Mr. Hays" first wife died in McLean 
county, in 1872, leaving four children, 
namely: Samuel L., who is married and en- 
gaged in farming in Oregon; Mary Erances, 
wife of C L. Howard, of Byron, Nebraska; 
Jessie, wife of Andrew Vercler. of Salem, 
Oregon, and W. C, who is married and fol- 
lows farming in this county. Mr. Hays 
was again married, in Li\ingston county, 
in 1874, to Mrs. Erances A. Clark, a daugh- 
ter of Almon Rhodes, an early settler, first 
of La Salle county and later of Livingston 
county. She was first married in the former 
county to Wilson M. Clark, a veteran of the 
Civil war, who died in 1870, leaving two 
daughters : Alda, a teacher of Black Hawk 
county, Iowa, and Laura B., wife of J. C. 
Rainbow, of Pottawattamie county, Iowa. 
By his second union our subject has six chil- 
dren, namely: George M., who assists in the 
operation of the home farm: Xellie. Pearl 



M., Eva E.. John S. and Lottie L., all at 
liome. 

I'olitically Mr. Hays was identifieil with 
the Republican party until 1896, when he 
voted for W. J. Bryan and free silver. He 
cast his first presidential ballot for Abraham 
Lincoln in i860. He has been a delegate 
to numerous conventions; ser\ed as com- 
missioner of highways in McLean couiity 
tor six years, and as a member of the school 
board for over thirty years, ha\ing always 
taken an active interest in educational af- 
fairs. Mrs. Hays and her daughter are 
members of the Baptist church and the fam- 
il\- is one of prominence in the community 
w here lhe\- reside. 



C.VPTAIX HEXRY B. REED. 

Captain Henry B. Reed, an honored cit- 
izen of Pontiac, now living a retired life at 
Xo. 504 South Mill street, is a veteran of 
the Civil war and bears an honorable record 
for brave service in the cause of freedom 
and union, and in the paths of jjeace has won 
an enviable reputation through the sterling 
i|ualities which go to the making of a good 
citizen. 

The Captain was born near Pottsville, 
Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, January 
29, 1833, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
( Barley) Reed. The father was also a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania and a son of Thomas 
Reed, who was born in the North of Ire- 
land and came to this country six years prior 
to the Revolutionary war, in which he took 
])art. He first settled near Philadelphia, and 
throughout life followed farming, dying at 
about the age of eighty years. (Jur sub- 
ject's father was a life-long resident i>f Penn- 



M. OF II . UB. 



52 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sylvania and a carpenter l)y trade. l)ut at the 
time of liis death was following farming in 
Schuylkill county. He died in February. 
1833, when our subject was only three weeks 
old. and the mother, who long survived him, 
departed this life in 1873. They had eleven 
children, of whom the Captain is the young- 
est. Onlv three are now living. Elijah, 
now seventy-six years of age, is living re- 
tired in Schylkill Haven, Pennsylvania, 
after having served for twenty-two years as 
superintendent of the car shops at that place. 
His wife died leaving five children that are 
still living. Rebecca is the wife of Jacob 
Zimmerman, who also worked in the car 
shops at that place for a great many years, 
but is now living retired at the age of sev- 
enty-five years, while his wife is sixty-nine 
years of age. They ha\'e a family of three 
sons and three daughters. 

Captain Reed remained with his mother 
in his native county until nine years of age. 
and then lived with a married brother on 
his farm in the same county until twelve 
years of age, when he commenced learning 
the shoemaker's trade in Schuylkill Haven, 
serving a three-years apprenticeship. The 
following year he was foreman in the shoe 
factory of Frederick Millett. at Tamaqua. 
Pennsyh'ania. and then started in business 
for himself at that place, remaining there 
until 1852 and building up a large business 
for those times. Receiving a good offer 
from the firm of Packer & Olewine, shoe 
manufacturers of Mauch Chunk. Pennsyl- 
vania, he accepted the position as foreman 
for that company, and was in tlieir employ 
a year and a half, after which he returned 
to Tamaqua. He was elected constable and 
Iield that ofiice until coming to Illinois in 
1853. He first located in Du Page c<~iunty. 
where he worked at his trade for a time. 



and later -was foreman for John Wallace, 
at Joliet, for about a year and a half, at the 
end of which time he removed to Blooming- 
ton. During the Lincoln campaign of i860, 
he was captain of the W'ide-Awakes, and 
came to this count\- with that political or- 
ganization. Being pleased with this locality 
he decided to remain and was engaged in 
the shoe business in Pontiac until the Civil 
war broke out. 

At the President's first call for troops, 
Captain Reed responded, being the first to 
enlist in Pontiac, and he helped organize 
the first company from that city, which was 
mustered in as Company D. Twentieth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry. He went to the 
front as second sergeant, but after the battle 
of Fort Donelson was promoted to second 
lieutenant, his commission citing that his 
promotion was for meritorious conduct on 
February 14. 15 and 16, 1862, at Fort Don- 
elson. Returning home June 30, 1862, he 
organized a company under the large call of 
that year, and again entered the service as 
captain of Company G, One Hundred and 
Twenty-ninth Volunteer Infantry, which 
was under General Sherman's command 
on the march to the sea, and from there 
marched on to Washington. D. C. Our sub- 
ject was mustered out at Chicago, in June, 
1865. as captain. 

After the war Captain Reed returned 
to his family in Pontiac, and was here en- 
gaged in the boot and shoe business for a 
number of years, but finally retired on ac- 
count of ill health. He was appointed by 
Governor Oglesby as custodian of memorial 
hall at Springfield, and was re-appointed by 
Governor Fifer. Since 1894 he has led a 
quiet, retired life at his home in Pontiac. 
By his ballot he supports the men and meas- 
ures of the Republican party, but has never 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



53 



siiught political lioiKirs. Ueliginusly lie is a 
member of the Methodist cluircli. and so- 
cially belongs to Pontiac Ltxlge. Xo. 294. 
F. & A. M.. and T. Lyle Dickey Post. Xo. 
105. (;. A. R.. of I'ontiac, of which he is 
l)ast commander. His loyalty as a citizen 
and his devotion to his country's interests 
have ever been among his marked charac- 
teristics, and the community is fortunate 
that numbers him among its citizens. 

On the jyth of September. 1850, in 
'J"ama(|ua. Pennsylvania. Captain Reed was 
iniited in marriage with Miss Esther Beck, 
a daughter of George and Mary ( Barbary ) 
Beck. o{ Carbon county, who were farming 
jieople and life-long residents of that state. 
'I he father died on his farm in Carbon coun- 
ty at the age (jf eighty-five years, his wife 
at eighty-six. Mrs. Reed's paternal grand- 
lather A\as a native of Germany and came to 
this country at an early date. To the Cap- 
tain and his wife were born nine children, 
six of whom are now living, namely: George 
O., born in Tamatiua. Pennsylvania, is now 
engaged in the boot and shoe business in 
Pontiac: Katie L., I)orn in Du Page county, 
Illinois, is the wife of Thomas Kay. a dry- 
goods merchant of Pontiac; Eilward O.. 
born in Bloomington, in i860, is now serv- 
ing as county treasurer of this county, and 
is a prominent citizen of Pontiac; Harry B., 
born in Pontiac, March 17, 1862. lias been 
mail clerk on the Chicago & .Alton Railroad 
for fourteen years, running between Chica- 
go and St. Louis, and makes his home in his 
birthplace; Josepii S., born in Pontiac. in 
1864, is now a groceryman of that city and 
lias served as alderman from tlie second 
ward ; Cora E. is the widow of Frederick 
O. Scrivens, late of Pontiac. and is assist- 
ant county treasurer at the present time. 
The other children died at an earlv asre. 



FREDERICK SCI 1()1-:XBECK. 

I'redcrick Schoenbcck is one of the 
worthy citizens that Germany has furnished 
to Livingston comity, and is today one of 
her most prosi)erous and successful farmers. 
He resides on section 15, Pike township, 
where he has a line farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, and besides this jjroperty 
he owns two other farms of similar size on 
sections 10 and 20. respect i\el\'. 

Mr. Schocnbeck was born in the king- 
dom i>f Prussia, CJermany, b'ebruary 26, 
1850, and attended the .schools of his native 
land for eiglit years. His knowledge of 
luiglish has mainly been acquired through 
his own unaided efforts. In 1867, at the 
age of se\enteen years, he crossed the ocean 
with his mother, brother and sister and 
joined an luicle in Peoria, where the mother 
subsec|uently married John Rutz. who later 
came to Livingston county and settled on a 
farm in Pike townshij). Our subject worked 
for an uncle in \\'oo(lford county, and then 
spent a year in Peoria county. In 1871 he 
came to Livingston county, and after work- 
ing for others two years he rented a farm, 
which he operated for the same length of 
tine. .\t the end of that period he pur- 
chased eighty acres in section 15, Pike town- 
ship, where he now resides. The improve- 
ments u])on the place at that time were of 
a very inferior order, but he has since erected 
a pleasant residence, good barns and out- 
buildings, has buiU fences, planted fruiit 
and ornamental trees and to-day has one of 
the best imijroved farms in the township. 
He has extended its Ixnindaries until it now 
contains one hundred and sixty acres, and his 
other farms are Iioth \aluable places of one 
hundred and sixty acres each. 

On the _>5th of March. 1873. Mr. Schoen- 



54 




OGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



beck was married, in I'eoria, Illinois, to 
Miss Frederica Wenke, a native of Olden- 
burg, Germany, and a daughter of John F. 
Wenke, who, on his emigration to America, 
settled in Peoria and purchased a farm ad- 
joining the cit}'. where he spent the re- 
mainder of his life, dying there in 1875. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schoenlieck ha\e four chil- 
dren, namely: Frederick. Jr.. at home: 
Katie, wife of Jnhn ]). Klein, a son of John 
Klein, who is represented on another page 
of this volume; Anna and William, both at 
home. 

Mr. Schoenheck cast his first presidential 
ballot for Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876, and 
has never wavered in his allegiance to the 
Repulilican party since that time, but he has 
never cared for political preferment. His 
life has been one of industry and persever- 
ance, and to these characteristics as well 
as his good business ability may be attributed 
his success, for he has received no outsitle 
aid. Both he and his wife were reared in 
the Lutheran faith and are highly respected 
and esteemed bv all who know them. 



DAVID S. :\IYERS. 

David S. Myers, of Pontiac. president of 
the Pontiac State Bank, is ranked generally 
as one of the safest financiers and most sa- 
gacious business men in central Illinois. If 
success is to be measured by results he luust 
be regarded as an eminently successful man. 
for not only his individual affairs, but all 
the enterprises he has organized and pro- 
moted in Pontiac and elsewhere ba\e pros- 
pered even beyc^nd his preilictions and the 
expectations of those he enlisted in these 
various undertakings. His active connec- 



tion with so many ]3rojects. both of a public 
and private nature, most of which contrib- 
uting to the material advancement of his 
county and city, marks Mr. Myers as one 
of the useful and prominent citizens of Liv- 
ingston county. 

Da\id S. Myers was born Feliruary 10, 
1858, on a farm near Russellville. Ohio,, 
and is now, July. 1900. only in the early 
maturity of intellectual and physical man- 
hood. He inherited much of the vigor of 
liis constitution and force of character from 
liis ancestors, who were people of reputation 
and intelligence, conspicuous in the pioneer 
history of Ohio. He is the son of William 
and Margaret Myers, both natives of Ohio, 
the former being born A larch 22, 18 14. at 
Russellville. and the latter in 1823 at George- 
town. This lad\\ who was a woman of 
practical merit and mental attainments, 
was the daughter of Ebenezer Moore, a sub- 
stantial and influential citizen of Brown 
county, Ohio, where he resided all his life 
as- a prosperous farmer and useful member 
of the community. His first political affilia- 
tions were with the Whigs, but later the 
progressive principles of the Republican 
party appealed to his sympathies and won 
his ardent support. As a girl Margaret had 
what she afterward considered the rare dis- 
tinction of being the schoolmate and study- 
ing the same lessons with an unpretentious 
lad who was destined to become the most 
famous soldier of his time. General V. S. 
(irant. the Grant and Moore families being 
neighbors. 

Francis Myers, grandfather of D. S. 
]\Ivers. was among the earliest settlers of 
southern Ohio, actively assisting in the tle- 
\elopment of the count}', and. ti)gether with 
his family, resolutely undergoing all the toil 
and privations that were assumetl bv those 




D. S. MYERS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



57 



devoted pioneers wlm hla^^ed the wav and 
snn)othed tlie path for tlie coniino- "enera- 
tions. 

W'ilham Myers, fatlier of D. S. Myers, 
was in many respects a remarkable man. 
He passed the largest portion of his life in 
Ohio, his native state, where he achieved 
the noteworthy record of having taught 
school uninterruiitedly for forty years. The 
entire course of his life was regulated and 
directed by his lo\e of humanity, his sense of 
justice and his sym])athy with the oppressed, 
and he was one of those dauntless spirits, 
who, known as Abolitionists, were the 
vanguard of that grand movement which 
resulted in the extinction of slavery within 
the borders of the United States. His home 
was one of the stations on the "Underground 
Railway," which was the significant name 
of a secret byway over which fugitive slaves 
were assisted and hurried from the yoke of 
bondage to the blessings of liberty. He was 
suspected and his life often endangered, 
but no intimidation could swerve him from 
his convictions of right. William Myers 
had been a \\ lug, but the noble mission of 
the abolition of slavery proclaimed by the 
Republican party iniluced him to pledge his 
voice and vote to that organization. For 
a time but two Rei)ublican \-otes were re- 
corded in iii^ township, one of which was his 
own. lie enjoyed the distinction that few 
could claim of having cast his first presi- 
dential vote for William Henry Harrison 
and his last for that president's grandson, 
Benjamin Herrison. William Myers was a 
man of culture in book knowledge as well 
as of practical intelligence in the affairs of 
life, being a close observer and a clear 
thinker, with distinct though liberal views 
on all the political and .social problems of 
the time. He was evervwhere honored for 



his excellent ((ualities of head and heart and 
imi\ersally respected for his unyielding 
tidelity to principle. He resided on bis farm 
until 1888. when his .son induced his father 
and mother to come to Pontiac and make 
their home with him, antl he contributed to 
their comfort and the serenity of their de- 
clining years until death closed their eyes 
in eternal slumber, .\fter a life seldom 
e(|ualled in its steadfast ])ur])ose of uplift- 
ing his race, William .Myers died in March, 
1896, and was followed a year later l)v his 
worthy heli)mate, a loyal wife, devoted 
mother and sympathetic friend. Both lived 
as exemplary Christians, being until death 
members of the Presbyterian church. 

The boyhood and early manhood of 
David S. Myers was passed upon his father's 
farm, where he formed habits of industry, 
a fi.xed ]nu-pose in life and stability of char- 
acter, and in the district schools where he 
acquired the elementary principles of edu- 
cation, and under the vigilant e\-e of his fa- 
ther, the most eft'ective training that any boy 
could receive. To prepare himself for the 
])rofe,ssion of teaching he attended different 
normal schools in southern Ohio and so im- 
])roved his advantages that he soon qualified 
and was called to take charge of schools, 
tirst in Kentucky and then in Ohio. In 1883 
he came to Livingston county, Illinois, a 
movement upon which all his later successes 
aj^jjear to hinge. 1 lere he engaged in teach- 
ing for nearly two years in Owego and 
Saunemin townshiijs. with the most satis- 
factor}- results. Going to Chicago he en- 
tered a real estate office, where he diligently 
ap])lied his time for a year, familiarizing 
himself with the details and acquiring much 
\aluable knowledge of real estate transactions. 
Returning to Livingston county be, with N. 
O. Tanquary, opened the real estate office 



58 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Taiiquary & ]vlyers in Pontiac, an ar- 
rangement wliich continued in force until 
1889, when Mr. Tanquary's withdrawal dis- 
solved the firm, since which time Mr. Myers 
has conducted an extensive real estate busi- 
ness independently, always beneficially to his 
patrons and satisfactory to himself. During- 
the years following 1888 several additions 
to the city of Pontiac. owned by Mr. Myers, 
were platted and opened to market. By 
inviting buyers who improved the property 
and became actual residents, he has promoted 
the growth of the city in wealth and popu- 
lation and thereby enhanced the value of 
all real estate, stimulated business and in- 
creased the general prosperity. The first 
project of this kind in which he was inter- 
ested, known as Camp's addition, comprised 
sixteen acres of eligible lots and is now the 
most desirable residence portion of the city. 
A second addition to this tract has since been 
opened. Myers' first, second, third, fourth 
and fifth additions have also been platted, 
all of which have their attractions and in all 
of which lots are being rapidly disposed of 
to home builders, many of whom he has 
assisted in their improvements. At this 
time, July, 1900, there are but two other 
additions on the market, and in one of these, 
the Riverside addition, near the shoe factory, 
lie holds an interest. In 1899 Myers sold 
thirty thousand dollars worth of \'acant lots, 
in his various additions to Pontiac, which not 
only attests his ability as a real estate dealer, 
but is substantial evidence of the remark- 
able growth and improvement of the city. 
For the past ten years Mr. Myers has been 
interested in drainage and reclaiming ex- 
tensive tracts of swamp lands in Livingston, 
Lee, Henry and Bureau counties, in Illinois, 
and La Porte countv. Indiana, and is the 
owner of a largfe amount of \erv \aluable 



and ]iighly;_ product! \-e land in each of these 
counties. 

Mr. Myers does not lieliex-e that a city 
can become permanently prosperous without 
productive industries employing skilled labor. 
Hence he has encouraged such enternrises 
in Pontiac, and was one of the founders, as 
well as the first stockholder, and is still a 
director, in the Pontiac Shoe Manufacturing 
Company, one of the most extensive and 
prosperous plants of this kind in the United 
States, affording employment to more than 
three hundred persons, disbursing for its 
pay roll more than one hundred and twenty- 
fi\e thousand dollars annuall}' and an annual 
product valued at nearly one million dollars. 
In 1899 Mr. Myers became interested in the 
Allen Candy Company, which was incor- 
porated with a ca])ital stock of twenty-five 
thousand dollars. He was chosen as one of 
the directors and the company is now in suc- 
cessful operation. Mr. Myers was the chief 
promoter of the organization of the Pontiac 
State Bank, which was incorporated and 
opened for business in February, 1899. He 
was the larest stockholder and was elected 
president, which position he still fills ac- 
ceptably to patrons and to the best interests 
of the bank. Under his able management, 
assisted by an efficient board of directors, 
comprising some of the most capable business 
men of Pontiac, the Pontiac State Bank was 
a success from its inception, and is recog- 
nized as one of the solid financial institu- 
tions of central Illinois. The bank occupies 
elegantly appointed rooms in the corner of 
the new Sterry block, which were especially 
designed for that purpose. 

The Pontiac Chautauqua Association is 
the pride and lioast of every citizen, and has 
been popular as well as prosperous from its 
first asseml)ly. Mr. Myers actively pro- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



59 



motetl its organization and has since iieen 
one of its directors. In 1899 its earnings 
were fifty-five per cent, on its stock. He 
rendereil valuable aid in founding the ]nihlic 
library, and ])urchased. at a liberal price, land 
donated by Mr. Babcock. besides contribut- 
ing generously to the library fund. The 
townshi]) high school was another object of 
his generous public spirit, donating the 
grounds in the center of which stantls the im- 
posing school building. 

Mr. Mvers has al\va\s been an interested 
student of state and national affairs, and is 
well informed on all the public questions of 
the day. Politically, he is an a\o\ved Re- 
publican of the most pronounced type. His 
first presidential vote was given to General 
Garfield in 1880. He has participated act- 
ively in county and citv politics and rendered 
^•aluable assistance to his party. In 1892 
he was selected as councilman from the first 
ward, and while acting in that capacity ad- 
vocated the system of sewerage and adoption 
of water works which marked the beginning 
of an era of city improvements. In 1897 
he was elected mayor of the city, his ad- 
ministration being one of the most import- 
ant and successful in its benefits to the city 
in the ni'.toiyof Pontiac.includingtheremoval 
of the unsightly raised sidewalks and bring- 
ing the streets and sidewalks to a uniform 
grade. From June. 1898. to June. 1900. he 
served as chairman of the Republican county 
central committee and brought to that posi- 
tion the same energy and sagacity that he 
exercised so effectively in other affairs. .\s 
a prominent and active Republican Mr. 
Myers is well known to the leaders through- 
out the state. 

Mr. Myers is a man of keen perceptions, 
almost unerring in his judgment of men 
and affairs and of the verv first order of 



executive ability. In his methods of 
thought and action he is very deliber- 
ative, weighing every word before it is ut- 
tered and measuring everv step before it is 
taken. He is (piiet auvl self-possessed, and 
he turns- off transactions involving tens of 
thousands of dollars with less palaver than 
many men would require to consummate the 
most trilling transaction. . The elements 
that contribute to his unexampled successes 
are umlouhtedly his sclf-e\'ident honesty and 
sincerity, which in\ ite confidence, the clear 
manner in which he presents a ])roposition, 
his excellent judgment in making invest- 
ments and his exceptional al)ility in organiz- 
ing and luaturing extensive enterprises. He 
is unselfish in his success, for every step in 
his prosperity has been marked by some ad- 
vantage to his city and county. .\s an ex- 
ample of what may be accomplished by a 
well-balanced, energetic and ambitious young 
man, dependent absolutely upon his own ef- 
iovts. the career of Mr. Myers is invaluable. 
-Mthough an inten.sely busy man, and 
while engaged in business oblivious to everv 
distraction, Mr. Myers, recognizing all the 
obligations of citizenship and .societv. has 
a very agreeable social side to his nature. 
He has a refined home, one of the most ele- 
gant residences in Livingston county, which 
is located on Cirove street, overlooking the 
\'ermillion river, and has a cultured family. 
On I'ebruary 9. 1887. David S. Myers and 
Miss Louise Catherine Slyder w^re united 
in marriage. Mrs. Myers is a lady of 
acknowledged refinement, supplemented by 
a practical, womanly disposition and a cheer- 
ful nature. She was born in Lixingston 
county, one of ten children, her father being 
Simon F. Slyder. a prominent citizen of the 
same county. Four children came to bless 
this union, two of whom are living. Diller 



6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Slyder and Anna Louise. TTie family are 
regular attentlants of and liberal contributors 
to the maintenance of the jMethodist Epis- 
copal church of Pontiac. The passing years 
have justified the wisdom of Mr. Myers in 
the choice of a bride, for their domestic re- 
lations are A'ery happy and their home life 
what mav 1)e trulv termed ideal. 



CHARLES L. ROMBERGER. 

Prominent among the enterprising, pro- 
gressive and successful men of Dwight is the 
subject of this- sketch, who as a lawyer and 
business man has been prominently identified 
with its interests for several years. His life 
history most happily illustrates what may be 
attained by faithful and continued effort in 
carrying out an honest purpose. Activity antl 
energy hav6 been the crowning points of his 
success, and his connection with various en- 
terprises have been of decided advantage to 
his community, promoting its material wel- 
fare in no uncertain manner. 

I\Ir. Romberger was born in a log cabin 
in Wyanet, Bureau county, Illinois, June 12, 
1862. His father, L. D. Romberger, was 
born in Pennsylvania, April 23, 1831, of 
German ancestry, and was left an orphan 
\\lien only a _\'ear old. At the age of eight he 
started out in life for himself and ser\-ed an 
apprenticeship to the tinner's trade. He was 
about twenty-three years of age w hen he re- 
moved to Wyanet, Illinois, where he was 
married, March i, i860, to Francisca L. 
Weaver, who was also born in Pennsylvania, 
P'ebruary 20, 1839, and had come west with 
her parents, who were engaged in the hotel 
liusiness. Air. Romberger was engaged in 
merchandising in Wvanet for a few vears 



and later followed farming for two years, 
after w hich he mo\ed to Princeton, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in the mercantile 
business until his health failed, in 1880, 
when he sold out and has since devoted his 
attention to bee culture, having one of the 
largest apiaries in the United States. He 
has always been a stanch Republican in poli- 
tics, but ne\er an aspirant for office, though 
he is now serving as justice of the peace. 
Of his three children, one died in infancy; 
Emma L. is now the wife of Frank H. Hoff- 
man, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and 
Charles L. completes the familv. 

The primary education of our subject 
was obtained in the public schools of Prince- 
ton, and he was graduated from the high 
school of that city at the age of seventeen 
years. He then entered the law department 
of the L'nixersity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 
where he was graduated at the age of nine- 
teen and received the degree of LL. B., 
March 2Q, 1882. He was not permitted to 
practice, however, until he attained his ma- 
jority, when the state of Michigan forwarded 
his certificate, and he was admitted to prac- 
tice at the bar of Illinois, September 24, 
1883. After his graduation he located at 
Ottawa, Illinois, and entered the office of 
Mayo & \\'idmer, prominent attorneys of 
that place, with whom he remained for fif- 
teen months. 

In 1884. at the suggestion of Hon. W'ul- 
ter Reeves, now member of congress from 
this district, Mr. Romberger came to Dwight 
and opened a law office over the People's 
Bank, being alone in business until 1887, 
when he formed a partnership with John 
C. Hetzel, a real estate and insurance agent, 
under the firm name of Hetzel & Romberger. 
In 1 89 1 he bought out his partner and con- 
tinued alone until Xo\ember, 1895, when he 



THE BIOGRATHICAL RFX'ORD. 



6i 



sold a lialf interest in the business to Frank 
L. Smith, the lirni being known as Romberger 
& Smith. Their specialty is real estate and real 
estate work, although they do a private bank- 
ing business for accommodation of friends 
and acquaintances. Without question the 
firm does one of the largest loan and real es- 
tate businesses in central Illinois, this fact 
being conceded by all other firms in their 
line. At present they are extensively inter- 
ested in Mississippi and Louisiana lands. 
Their holdings in the latter state are timber 
lantls, wiiich the firm purchased with tlie 
view of enhancing their value, and in jan- 
ary. 1900^ they sold one tract of twelve 
thousand acres in Madison parish. 1 his is 
desirable property, being accessible to steam- 
boats and the \'icksburg, Shreveport & Pa- 
cific Railroad. The Mississippi land is in 
the Delta country and is also covered with 
hardwood lumber, principally oak, ])ecan 
and gum. When cleared this will be- 
come excellent cotton land. Besides this 
property the firm has about fifteen hundred 
acres of fine farming land in Lee county, 
Illinois, which is well improved and under 
a high state of cultivation, and also oper- 
ates largely in biwa and Lidiana lands. 
Since coming to Dwight 'Slv. Romberger 
has had complete charge of tiie Keeley Com- 
pany's legal business, and is attorney for 
the estate of Dr. Leslie E. Keeley. He is 
also local attorney for the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad. He does very little court work, 
however, his entire legal business being con- 
fined to ofiice practice. He is interested in 
the Keeley Institute, located at Xo. J803 
Locust street, St. Louis, Missouri, being a 
partner of Dr. J. E. Blaine, who for eight 
years was chief of the medical staff of the 
Leslie E. Keeley Company of DwigfTt. 

On the 7th of October, 1S84. Mr. Rom- 



berger married Miss Nellie M. Ensign, a 
native of Connecticut, and a daughter of 
Edward H. and Martha S. Ensign. By 
this union three children were born, the old- 
est, a daughter, died in infancy. Louise E. 
ilied very suddenly of tonsilitis, November 
2, 1899, at the age of twelve vears. Emma 
T., aged eleven years, is attending school in 
Dwight. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Romberger are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, and he is 
also a prominent member of the Masonic 
fralcrnitv. In 1884 he was made a Master 
Alason in Livingston Lodge, No. 371, A. 
F. & .\. ;M., of Dwight, of which he is now 
past master, and received the higher degrees 
in Orient Chapter, No. 31, R. A. M., and 
Blaney Commandery, No. 5, K. T., of Morris, 
Illinois; Dwight Chapter, No. 166, O. E. 
S., of which he is past worthy patron; is a 
member of the Oriental Consistory and Me- 
dinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, both of 
Chicago. He is now a member of Wil- 
mington Chapter, No. 142, R. A. M., of 
which he is past high priest, and Joliet Com- 
mandery, No. 4, K. T., of which he is senior 
warden. Since old enough to vote Mr. 
Romberger has affiliated with the Republi- 
can party, and in 1892 was elected president 
of the board of trustees of the village of 
Dwight on the ticket advocating ))ublic im- 
provements. He has always taken the lead 
in anything tending to advance the inter- 
ests of his town and worked hard to get the 
sewerage system, electric light and water 
works adopted and cement sidewalks laid. 
Therefore during his administration there 
were more improvements made than at any 
other time, and he is justly numbered among 
Dwight's most progressive and public-spir- 
ited citizens. He is emphatically a man of 
enterprise, positive character, indomitable 



62 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



energy, strict integrity and liberal views, 
and is thoroughly identified in feeling with 
the growth and prosperity of his city. 



NATHAN S. GRANDY. 

Nathan S. Grandy, deceased, was num- 
bered among the honored pioneers of Li\- 
ingston county, where he located when this 
region was wild and unimproved. In the 
work of de\-elopment he took an actixe part 
in the early days and aided in opening up 
the country to civilization. As the years 
passed his faithfully performed duties of citi- 
zenship and his interest in the welfare and 
progress of the communit}- never aliated. 
Becoming widely and favorably known he 
made many friends, and his death was a loss 
to the entire community. 

Mr. Grandy was born October 6. 1816. 
in Phantom township. Addison county. \'er- 
mont, where he grew to manhood, and there 
worked at the carpenter's trade, as a manu- 
facturer of sash, doors and blinds. He first 
married a Miss Kent, who died in Illinois a 
few vears after soming here. After his 
marriage he came to Illinois, arriving in Chi- 
cago about the ist of May, 1850, when only 
thirtv miles of railroad extended from that 
city toward Galena, and a few miles had been 
built in this direction, there being not more 
than one hundred mdes in the state. From 
Chicago Mr. Grandy went to Alton, a part 
of the journey being made liy way of the Illi- 
nois river, and the whole trip occupying over 
a week. He first located in Kane, Greene 
county, Illinois, where he had a brother liv- 
ing, and there he engaged in farming for a 
time. 

While a resident of Greene countv, ^Nlr. 



Grandy was married, February 12, 1854, to 
Miss Harriet E. Christy, a native of Law- 
rence county, Illinois, and a daughter of 
John and Elizabeth (Denni.son) Christy, pio- 
neers of that county, where their marriage 
was celebrated. The father, who was a na- 
tive of Ohio and a farmer by (Occupation, re- 
moved to Greene county soon after the Ijirth 
of Mrs. Grandy and bought a tract of land 
in Kane, where he spent the remainder of 
his life. In religious belief he was a Baptist. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Grandy were born eight 
children, namely: T. E., a real estate dealer 
of Pontiac, married Elizabeth L. Mason; 
Harriet A., at home with her mother; Clara 
is the wife of .Albert G. Mason, of Pontiac, 
and they have four children living, Ollie, 
Leonard L., .\lice and Cress ; Charles E., 
who li\-es on a farm three miles and a hah' 
east of Pontiac, married Susan Foster, of 
Owego township, and they have two chil- 
dren, iMabel E. and Victor J.; George W., 
a resident of St. John's, Kansas, married 
Jennie Dudley, of Missouri, and they have 
one child, Pearl; William A., a lumberman 
of Mason City, Illinois, married Emma An- 
irim, and they have one child, Margery ; 
Henry li\es on the home farm and married 
Miss Tillie Hill; Mary J. is the wife of W. 
C. Young, a farmer living three miles east 
of Pontiac, and the}- ha\-e three children, 
Edith. Marshall and Lewis. 

In 1856 Mr. and Mrs. Grandy came to 
Livingston county and took up their resi- 
dence in Owego township, where he pur- 
chased a farm of eighty acres, on which 
was standing a small caliin, 14.X18 feet, made 
of rough slabs from the sawmill set up on 
end and the cracks filled with clay. The 
fioor was of ash and oak boards about ten 
inches wide hewed down, while the roof was 
made of real old-fashioned clapboards split 



THE llIOr.KAl'HICAL RFX'ORD. 



63 



from oak timl)er. In tliis rude dwelling the 
family lixed for nver a \ear. With the ex- 
ception of a few acres the farm was un- 
broken. C)n taking up his residence here 
Mr. Grandy at once turned his attention 
to the improvement and cultivation of his 
farm. The first winter he constructed a 
stable by ])utting f<irked poles into the 
ground, laying other jjoles across these ami 
covering them with brush and then with hay, 
while the sides were also banked up with 
hay. This comfortably sheltered his stock 
until a better barn could be built. He fenced 
his land and placed acre after acre under the 
plow until all was highly cultivated. In 
1861 a more substantial and comfortaljle 
residence was built, much of the timber being 
taken from his own wi od Int. two miles 
from his home. .Men were making the sills 
for the new house when the news came of 
the firing upon Fort Sumter. The house 
was completed that summer and is stiill 
standing. A large part of the finished lum- 
ber used in its construction was bought at 
sixty dollars ])er thousand and paid for with 
corn at ten cents per bushel. This had to be 
shelled, sacked and hauled to Pontiac. Mr. 
Grandy useil a small two-hole corn sheller, 
run by horse jjower. 

When he located in this cnnnty he cnuld 
travel in a northeaster!}- directiim fnmi his 
honie and find nut a Imuse nor a fence until 
within twii miles ni Kankakee, while his 
nearest trading places were Pontiac and 
Fairbury. Coal was almost unknown and 
was very high when obtainable. Several 
times during the first four years sjjent here, 
the Grandy home came \ery nearly being 
destroyed by the prairie fires. Mrs. Grandy 
once saved the house with a pail of water and 
her mop. They added to the farm by addi- 
tional purchase as their financial res(jurces 



increased, but in 1S7J sold it and bought two 
luiiidreil and fi ur acres in Pontiac township, 
one mile fro.m the court house, which Mrs. 
Grandy still owns, anil on which the family 
moved that year. Our subject made all of 
the improvements upon the place, inchuling 
the erection of a fine house, a good barn and 
substantial outbuildings. He was actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1877, 
when he was injured by a saw. after which 
he ])ractica!l_\' lived retiretl until his death, 
lieing" lilind the last two years of his life. 

Mr. Grandy was a Democrat in politics 
and took an acti\e and prominent part in the 
public affairs of his time. While a resident 
of Owego township he served as school treas- 
urer, assessor and justice of the peace, and 
was known throughout the county as S(|uire 
Grandy. In Pontiac township he served as 
road commissioner some years and took an 
active part in building the bridges and im- 
proxing the roads of his locality, assisting in 
the construction oi the fine iron bridge three 
miles west of Pontiac. In 1868 he was ap- 
i;ointed county commissioner by the board 
of supervisors to go over the county and re- 
appraise the swamp lands, to which business 
he devoted one whole summer, spending 
nearly all the time driving over the county. 
I le was one of the early members of the Bap- 
tist church and later attended services at 
Avoca. w here a church w as l)uilt for the use 
<if any dencjmination, this being much nearer 
his home. After his ren)oval to Pontiac he 
united with the Baptist clunxii in that city. 
He died on his farm, one mile east of Ponti- 
ac. June 26. 1890. honored and respected 
by all who knew him. Throughout his career 
of continuetl and far-reaching usefulness his 
duties were performed with the greatest care, 
and his personal honor and integrity were 
without blemish. 



64 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mrs. Grandy still survives her husband 
and now makes her home in Pontiac, where 
she has a lovely home at Xo. 317 East How- 
ard street. She has only li\'ed here a year, 
though owning the place for some time. She 
was always a true helpmeet to lier husband, 
aiding him in e\ery possible way, and is a 
most estimable lady, beloved and respected by 
all who know her on account of her sterling 
worth and manv excellencies of character. 



JOHN W. HOO\'ER. 

John \\'. Hoo\er, whose home is at Xo. 
215 East Livingston street, Pontiac, is one 
of the most public-spirited and enterprising- 
citizens of that place. He is a native of Illi- 
nois, born in Putnam county, March 9, 1S40, 
and is a son of Henry Mann and Sarah 
(Hunt) Hoover. The father was born in 
Pennsylvania, June 10, 1808, and in 1838 
came to Illinois, locating in Bureau county, 
where he engaged in farming until 1848 
and then went to California, crossing the 
plains with an ox team. The following four 
)'ears were passed in prospecting and min- 
ing, during which time he accumulated con- 
siderable property, but when just ready to 
return to his family in Illinois he met with 
a violent death and his hard-earned treasure 
was taken from him. His widow is still liv- 
ing at the age of eighty-eight years, and 
resides with her daughter in Minonk, Wood- 
ford county, Illinois. Only three of her ten 
children survi\-e. Two sons, George H. and 
Julius G., were soldiers of the Civil war, and 
died in Tennessee during their service. 

Our suliject remained with his mother 
on the home farm in Bureau county until 
1857, when they removed to Livingston 



county and located in X'ebraska township, 
where he engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until the breaking out of the Civil war, in 
1861, when he enlisted in the Third Illinois 
Cavalry, Company K. for three years. He 
participated in a number of battles in ]\Iis- 
souri and Arkansas, including the engage- 
ment at Pea Ridge, where he was wounded. 
He went to the gulf, was stationed at X^ew 
Orleans for a time, and was in the sieges of 
Port Hudson and Vicksburg. He was at 
the latter place at the time of the first re- 
pulse of Sherman, and remained there until 
the surrender to Grant. He was mustered 
out at Springfield, Illinois, as commissary 
sergeant, having held that position two years. 
After his discharge Air. Hoover returned 
to Livingston county and again engaged in 
farming in Xebraska township. Ihe sud- 
den death of his father had left the family 
in very straightened circumstances and 
placed a very heavy burden on the shoulders 
of our subject, but he early displayed that 
determination and grit which have carried 
him forward to a successful life. He was 
devoted to his mother and toiled early and 
late that she might have the comforts of life 
that she had been accustomed to before the 
death of her husband. He continued to en- 
gage in farming until the fall of 1870, when 
he was elected sheriff of Livingston county 
on the Democratic ticket and moved to Pon- 
tiac. He filled that office for one term with 
ci"edit to himself and to the general satis- 
faction of the public, and at its close em- 
barked in general merchandising, which he 
carried on until his store and its contents 
were destro}-ed by fire, Jul)' 4, 1874. Al- 
though he lost almost everything he pos- 
sessed, he was not cast down or crushed by 
the misfortune, but with characteristic en- 
ergy he immediately purchased another stock 




J. W. HOOVER. 




MRS. JOHN W. HOOVER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



69 



of goods and continued business until 1897, 
being associated witli Wilson Pittenger some 
years, and afterward \vitli ^\'. S. Sims for 
about five years, the firm name being Hoover 
& Sims. 1 le w as tiicn alone in business luitil 
selling out. in 1S97. 

Mr. Hoover was married. December 31, 
1868, to Miss Mary E. \'an Doren, of this 
county, a daughter of Hilyard and Eliza 
(Thompson) Van Doren. Her father was 
born in Xew Jersey, in 1808, and was si.K 
years old when he removed to Ohio with his 
parents. His father, John \'an Doren, also 
a native of Xew Jersey, conducted a hotel 
near Clarksville, Clinton county, Ohio, for 
many years. Throughout the greater part 
of his life Mrs. Hoover's father followed • 
the carpenter's trade, but after coming to 
Livingston county, Illinois, engaged in farm- 
ing and stock raising in Nebraska township. 
He was school trustee for many years and 
also filled the office of collector and super- 
visor for some years. He helped build the 
first school house in his township, advanc- 
ing money for the work until the district 
could reimburse him, and he organized the 
first Sunday school within its borders, serv- 
ices being held at his home until the school 
house and church were built. In 1885 he 
retired from active life and moved to Pon- 
tiac, where he died September i, 1898. His 
wife had departed this life February 14, 
1892. Mrs. Hoover is the youngest of their 
seven children. William T., the oldest, mar- 
ried Julia Smith in 1855, and is a prominent 
contractor and builder of Pontiac. Frank 
M. and Luther were both members of Com- 
pany A, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil 
war, and the latter was drowned in the Cum- 
berland river in Tennessee after serving one 
vear. Frank M. married Xettie Xickerson 



and resides on the old home farm in Ne- 
braska township. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover 
have a family of four children, namely : 
Ella I., born in Pontiac, was married, May 
JO, 1898, to Halbert Opperman, a grocer 
of Pontiac; Helen P. has for the past three 
years been head bookkeeper at the Pontiac 
Shoe manufactury; Edna R. is at home, 
and Maude W. is a student in the high school 
of Pontiac. 

In 1898 Mr. Hoover was elected super- 
visor of Pontiac township, and his services 
gave such universal satisfaction that in the 
spring of 1900 he was re-elected, being the 
only Democrat elected on the township ticket, 
which speaks well for his personal popularity 
and the confidence and trust reposed in him 
by his fellow citizens. He has been fire 
marshal of the city for the past twenty-five 
years, and was a member of the department 
for some years before. It has been his con- 
stant study to improve the department and 
the time he has devoted to that work has been 
well spent, for his efforts have been crowned 
with success. At present a new city hall and 
engine house is being erected. Mr. Hoover 
is an honored member of T. Lyle Dickey 
post, G. A. R., and attends and supports 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 



GEORGE Z. FI.ACILER. 

Prominent among the citizens of Dwight 
will) have witnessed the marvelous develop- 
ment of Livingston county in the last half- 
century, and who have, by honest toil and in- 
dustry, succeeded in acquiring a competence 
and are now spending the sunset of life in 
quiet and retirement, is the gentleman whose 
name introduces this sketch. 



70 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Flagler wa.s l)i)rn in Herkimer. New 
York, June 4, i8j8, aiul was reareil there 
until ten vear.s of ag'e. when he renKned to 
Ohio with his jiarents, Philip and Xancy 
(Dyg'ert) Flagler, also natives of New York. 
His paternal grandfather. Zachariah Flagler. 
Avas horn in France, and on his emigration 
to America settled in Dutchess county, Xew 
York, where, in the midst of the wilderness, 
he developed a farm and spent the remainder 
of his life. He reared a family of eleven chil- 
dren, ten sons and one daughter, of whom 
Piiilip was fifth in order of birth. 

On reaching manhood Philip Flagler re- 
moved to Herkimer countv. New York, he- 
coming one of its early settlers, and there he 
married Nancy Dygert, a daughter of '\\'ill- 
iam Dygert, who emigrated from Ciermariy 
to the United States at an early day. After 
his marriaee Mr. Flagler conducted a meat 
market in Frankfort, Herkimer county, until 
our subject was ten years of age, and then 
moved to Middlebury, Portage county. Ohio. 
going by way of the Erie canal to Buffalo. 
by lake to Cleveland, by canal to Akron, 
Ohio, and from there across the countr}- l)y 
wagon to Middlebury, where he worked at 
the shoemaker's trade fi\'e years. He then 
returned to New York by the same refute, 
this time locating in Dutchess county, where 
he followed farming until a few years prior 
to his death, when he sold his farm and 
moved to Rochester, New York. There he 
lived retired until called to his final rest, 
at the age of seventy years. The mother 
of our subject had died many years pre\-ious. 
leax'ing si.x children, who reached man and 
womanhood, namely : (ieorge Z., Catherine. 
Walter, Albert, William and Oscar, all still 
living with the exception of Walter. Cath- 
erine is the wife of Philip Miller, of Dwight. 
Illinois. For his second wife the father mar- 



ried Katherine \\"rig'ht, by w lioni he had one 
daughter, Annie. 

George Z. Flagler recei\e(l his education 
in the schools of Portage county, Ohio, and 
Dutchess count}-. New York, and remained 
at home with his father until after bis mar- 
riage. On the 27tb of September, 1848, 
when twenty-one years of age. lie married 
Phebe Jane Clarkson, then sixteen. They 
luet at the village school in Stormville, New 
York, and the friendship there formed soon 
ri])ened into a Ime that has never died out, 
fi::r they are still lo\ers, the same as in the 
days long gone by. Airs. Flagler was born 
in Dutchess county, of which her parents, 
Egbert and Maria ( facox ) Clarkson. were 
also nati\es. while her paternal grandfather, 
Charles Clarkson, was a native of England, 
having emigrated to this country at an early 
day. For many years her father followed 
farming in Dutchess county, but in the fall 
of 1856 he came to Livingston county. Illi- 
nois, where he lived retiretl until bis death, 
at the age of sixty-three years. His wife 
died at the age of seventy-three. In their 
family were four children. \\'illiam. Hamil- 
ton. Phebe Jane and Mary Elizabeth,but Mrs. 
Flagler is the only one now living. To our 
subject and his wife were born three chil- 
dren, namely : ( i ) Eugene, a resident of 
Dwight. married Letty Potter, and they have 
two children : Stella, wife of Eberett Lewis, 
a jeweler of Dwight. by whom she has one 
child, Harland : and Louise. (2) John \\'., 
an in\alid residing in Dwight, married 
Laura Lee, and they have one child, Helen. 
( 3 I George N.. who has succeeded his fa- 
ther in the- lumber business, married Letty 
Saltmarsh, and they have two children, Ed- 
die and Mattie. 

After his marriage Mr. Flagler remained 
with his father a vear, but determining to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



71 



engfage in business for himself, he rented a 
farm of one Inmdred and se\en acres in 
Dutchess county, .\'e\v ^'nrk, whicli he suc- 
cessfully o])erated for three years. Selling" 
out in the east he came to Illinois in 1855. 
and after spending" ten days at Joliet pro- 
ceeded to Dwight, Livingston county, where 
he hired out to a Mr. Spencer, whose farm 
included the present home of our subject. 
After working" for him one year he was \a- 
ri<iusly empkned for a time, and then turuetl 
his attention to the carpenter's trade. One of 
the first houses which he built is the one he 
is now living in. it being situated on a part 
of the old Spencer farm and is one of the 
most beautiful places in Dwight, surrounded 
by four acres of well-kept grounds. Here 
Mr. Flagler located in 1899. The first house 
that he owned in Dwight is still standing. 
He continued to follow the carpenter's trade 
for several years, and in 1874 became inter- 
ested in the lumber business, which he car- 
ried on alone fur three years, when he 
formed a jiartnership with Thomas Sims, 
under the name of Flagler & Sims. Three 
years later this was dis.solved and Zed John- 
son purchased an interest in the business, 
which was conducted under the firm name of 
Flagler & Johnson for three years and a 
half. From that time on he was alone in 
business until 1897. when he was succeeded 
by his SDU. ( ieorge \., who still carries it on. 
w hile our sul)ject is practically living retired, 
tlmugh he still continues to k)ok after his 
property interests in Dwight. which include 
a number of houses. 

Mr. Flagler'has been prominently identi- 
fied with almost the entire growth and de- 
\elopment of Dwight, as when he located 
there there were only six houses in the place. 
During the first year of his residence here 
he and his wife, with another faniilv, oc- 



cupied a little shanty, 16x24 feet. In 1856 
he rmd William Clarkson each built a house, 
the first that were erected that year. One 
Sunday the two men went out alx)ut three 
miles in the country and got some x'oung 
basswood trees, which they l)rought ti^ town 
on their backs and planted, these being the 
first trees set out in Dwight, as the place at 
that time was flat prairie land, unadorned 
by trees or shrubs. .Mr. Flagler lieli)ed or- 
ganize the village and has aided materially 
in its growth and building, assisting in the 
erection of must of the older dwellings of 
the place. He heli)ed Iniild the Presbyterian 
church, which was the first house of worship 
erected in Dwight, and later, as a contractor, 
built the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
was line of the first trustees of the village, 
being elected on a temperance ticket, and 
was a member of the village board four 
terms. i'v his ballot he has always sup- 
jjorted the men and measures of the Dem- 
ocratic party at national elections, but in 
local affairs, when no issue is involved, votes 
for the man whom he believes best ciualified 
to fill the oiifice. Socially he is a member of 
Living.ston lodge. No. 371, F. & A. M., and 
Wilmington Chapter, Xo. 142, R. A. M. 
During their long residence in Dwight Mr. 
and Mrs. Flagler have made a host of warm 
friends, have gained the confidence and re- 
spect of all who know them, and as honored 
|)ioneers and representative citizens arc cer- 
tainly deserving of prominent mention in a 
work of this kind. 



STEPHEN' A. GOODM.VX. 

Stephen A. Goodman, the efficient en- 
gineer of the Dwight Electric Light Com- 
])any anrl a highly respected citizen of 



72 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Dwight, Illinois, was bom in Hunting-don 
county, Pennsylvania, December 26, 1851, 
and is a son of James J. and Catherine (Nu- 
men ) Goodman, also natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. By trade the father was a wagon- 
maker and bridge carpenter, and during his 
residence in the Keystone state followed 
bridge building on railroads and canals. In 
1867 he brought his family to Illinois and lo- 
cated on a farm in Dwight township. t\\o 
miles .southwest of the town of Dwight. mak- 
ing his home there for two years, at the end 
of which time he took up his residence in 
town, where his death occurred, in 1884, and 
where his wife is still living-. In their fam- 
ily were ten children, namely : Anna, wife 
of ^^'. H. \\'atson, a conductor on the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad and a resident of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania; IVIattie, widow of G. W. 
Stewart and a resident of Union Furnace, 
Pennsylvania; Stephen A., oiu^ subject; 
Emma, wife of George Taylor, a farmer and 
dairyman of Dwight township; Alfred, a 
farmer of Grundy county, Illinois ; James. 
a conductor on the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
road ; George, who is employed in the round 
house at Dwight ; Mary, twin of George and 
deceased wife of John Camerorn, of Ono, 
Willow county. Nebraska; Nora, wife of 
Frank Phole, of Dwight ; and Bruce, an en- 
gineer on the Chicago & Alton Railroad. 

The boyhood and youth of Stephen A. 
Goodman were mainly passed in Pennsyl- 
vania, and at the age of fifteen he entered 
the Mill Creek furnace shops to learn the 
blacksmith and machinist's trades, his father 
being then engaged in the hotel business at 
Mill Creek. He was sixteen years of age 
when the family came to Illinois, and for a 
time he worked at his trade in Dwight. Sub- 
sequently he accepted a position as engineer 
and general assistant with the firm of Hef- 



fenbaugh & Rutan, but his first permanent 
position as engineer was in the old stone m!Il 
of Hahn & Siegert, where he was employed 
two years. He next entered the service of 
the Chicago & Alton Railroad in the mund 
house at Dwight, and later was fireman on 
the Streator branch of that road and served 
the company until 1893. He spent two years 
as fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad, 
running between Altoona and Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. In November, 1896, he ac- 
cepted his present position with the Dwight 
Electric Light Company, and has since filled 
it in a most capable and satisfactory manner. 

On the 22d of September. 1877. at 
Dwight. was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Goodman and Miss Belle Goodspeed, a na- 
tive of Grundy county, Illinois, and a daugh- 
ter of George R. and Emily ( Starkey ) 
Goodspeed. Her father gave u]) his life for 
,his country as a soldier of the Civil war. 
During the last ten years of her life Mrs. 
Goodspeed made her home with our sub- 
ject and there died March 31, 1897. }*Irs. 
Goodman died January 12, 1893, and of the 
three children born of that union, Emma 
died at the age of four years and Hattie 
at the age of eleven. Charles is still living 
and is with his father. Mr. Goodman was 
again married, in Peoria, Illinois, April 20, 
1897, ^^'^ second union being with Miss 
Agnes McCloskey, a native of Blair county, 
Pennsylvania. They have a pleasant home 
in Dwight, erected by him in 1882. 

In political affairs j\Ir. Goodman sup- 
ports the Democratic party. While a resi- 
dent of Altoona, Pennsylvania, he joined the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and now 
affiliates with Dwight Lodge, No. 513. of 
which he is past noljle grand. He is also a 
member of Pacific Encampment, No. 126, 
and was elected and installed chief patriarch, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



73 



l)Ut resignetl on account of liis night work, 
wliicli occupies iiis time to the exclusion of 
everything else. He is a thorough and 
^-killed machinist and is a highly respected 
and honored citizen of Dwight. He was for 
tive years a member of the Illinois state 
guards and was honorably discharged. 



X. .M. .\M) TRUMAX .M. KKLI.OCCr. 

These brothers, who are numl)ered anmng 
the re[)resentative citizens of Pontiac town- 
.ship, Livingston county, own and operate 
a fine farm of three liundred and twenty 
acres on section 8. pleasantly located on 
Wolf creek, within three miles of the 
city of Pontiac. They are natives of 
( )neiila countv, Xew ^'ork. the former 
born near L'tica June 29. 18J9. the lat- 
ter October 7, 1835, and belong to an old 
colonial family of English origin, w liich was 
founded in this country by two brothers, 
who were among the pioneers of Connecti- 
cut. Our suljjects" paternal grandfather, 
Truman Kellogg, was a native of that state 
and a pioneer of Oneida county, Xew York, 
where he located in 1790. There he cleared 
and improved a farm in the midst of the 
wilderness, making it his home throughout 
the remainder of his life. The father, who 
also bore the name of Truman, was born in 
that county, in 1795. and on reaching man- 
hood married ^lalinda Marsh, also a native 
of Oneida county. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation and lived on the old Kellogg home- 
stead throughout life, dying there May 17, 
1867. He survived his wife only a few 
weeks, as she died March 3, 1867. In their 
family were four chiklren. two sons and two 
daughters, but only the former are now liv- 
ing. 



In the county uf their nativity the broth- 
ers passed their boyhood and youth, being 
provided with good educational advantages 
in both common and select .schools. In 1852 
Truman M. went to Chicago, where he en- 
tered the employ of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company, in the engineer department, 
as a rodman, and for twenty years was em- 
ployed in the general ofifice of the civil en- 
gineer for the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany at that cit}-, being promoted for suc- 
cessful scr\-ice tnmi rodman ti> division en- 
gineer, and as such he superintended the con- 
struction of the Lake Shore harbor. X. M. 
Kellogg remained at home with his parents 
until their deaths, having charge of the 
farm. In 1868 he came to Livingston coun- 
ty. Illinois, and purchased the farm in Pon- 
tiac township where the brothers now re- 
side. They located thereon in 1871, and 
have since devoted their time and energies 
to the further improvement and cultivation 
of the place, converting it into one of the 
most desirable farms of its size in the coun- 
ty. They follow general farming and have 
engaged extensively in feeding and shipping 
stock, fattening from six to ten car-loads of 
cattle and hogs annually. To this branch of 
their business they have devoted considerable 
attention for the past fifteen years, and re- 
cently have made a specialty of the breeding 
and raising of good roadster horses of the 
Hamiltonian and other standard bred stock. 
Success has attended their well-directed ef- 
forts and the}' are now numbered among the 
most substantial men of the community in 
which they live. 

Politically the Kellogg brothers have 
been life-long Democrats, and X. M. has 
served as highway commissioner for fifteen 
years, but neither have cared for official hon- 
ors, preferring to give their undivi<le<l atten- 



74 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tion to their extensive business interests. 
They are men of keen perception and sounil 
judgment and their success in life is due to 
their own well-directed efforts, so that they 
deserve to be prominent!}- mentioned among 
the leading and representative business men 
of this county. Fraternally, Truman M. is 
a member of the Masonic lodge of Pontiac, 
ha\-ing been made a Master Mason some 
years ago. 



CHARLES H. LOXG, M. D. 

The world has little use for the misan- 
tlirope. The universal truth of brotherhood 
is widely recognized, also that he serves God 
best who serves his fellow men. There is no 
profession or line of btisiness that calls for 
greater self sacrifice or more devoted atten- 
tion than the medical profession, and the suc- 
cessful physician is he, who through love of 
his fellow men gives his time and attention to 
the relief of human suffering. Dr. Long is 
one of the ablest representatives of this noble 
calling successfully engaged in oractice in 
Pontiac, Illinois. 

The Doctor was born in Dimmick town- 
ship. La Salle county, this state. May 14, 
1850, a son of Archibald and Adeline 
(Leigh) Long. The father was born in Gal- 
lipolis, Gallia county, Ohio, in October, 
1825, a son of Archibald and Catherine 
(Keller) Long. The grandfather was born 
near Wheeling, \\'est \'irginia, September 
24, 1791, and was one of a large family of 
children left orphans at an early age, and 
who were thrown upon the world to make 
their own way with little educational ad- 
vantages. He managed, however, to acquire 
much varied information, which, with untir- 
ing energy, he ever put to use for the uplift- 



ing of his fellow men. After drifting about 
through Tennessee, Georgia and North Car- 
olina during his boyhood he was finally mar- 
ried, in October, 1813, and settled in (ial- 
lipolis, Ohio, where most of his family were 
born and where he acquired some property. 
He also secured the maintenance of select 
schools in the count}', and early became a 
leader and exhorter in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and afterward a licensed 
preacher. He spent a few years in Indiana, 
and then, in order to secure homes for his 
children, now grown, he came to Illinois, 
locating first in the militar}- tract, near Knox- 
\il!e, Knox county, in 1834. He built the 
first mill in that section and opened his house 
for church and school purposes, there being 
neither in his locality. He regularly filled 
appointments to preach for miles around, 
and our subject now has in his possession the 
parchment certificate given by Bishop Mor- 
ris, in 1839, at his ordination as deacon. 
He soon secureil the building of a church 
at Hermon, the expense of which was largly 
borne by himself. At camp meetings and 
revivals he was recongized as powerful in ex- 
hiortation anil prayer. It was at a meeting 
in his house that his son, Archibald, Jr., and 
Rev. M. L. Haney were converted. In 1849 
he removed to La Salle county, and early 
the following year secured the organization 
of a church at La Salle, there having been 
no religious society there prior to that time. 
He resolved to build a house of worship and 
went about with his usual energy to accom- 
plish this, hauling lumber, raising money and 
working on the building. \\'hile thus en- 
gaged he was exposed to the inclemency of 
the weather and contracted a disease that 
affected his lungs and eventually caused his 
death. His home was always the stopping 
place for all ministers, and he labored un- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



7S 



tiringly for liis cluircli. He held nio?t all 
the l(.)cal offices, inchuling those of school di- 
recti.ir and justice of the peace, and in his 
deatli the community realized that it had 
lost one of its most valued anil useful citi- 
zens. 

Archihald Long. Jr., the father of our 
subject, was reared on his father's farm near 
Knoxville, and received a good practical ed- 
ucation in the select school conducted in his 
father's liome. This was largely supple- 
mented in later years by extensive reading 
and observation. He built the first saw- 
mill at Knoxville and engaged in milling 
for some time. In early days before the 
grist-mill was built, the family hauled their 
grain to Chicago, a distance of two hun- 
dred miles. The early i)i( meers ground their 
cornmeal on stones. After building the mill 
the Long family sometimes rafted flour 
down the Mississippi river to St. Louis. 
In Knox county, Archibald Long, Jr., was 
married, in 1847, to Miss Adeline Leigh, a 
daughter of Robert Leigh, a veteran of the 
war of 1 81 2, and an early settler of that 
county, where he followed farming until his 
death. Her paternal great-grandfather, 
Leigh, was private secretary to George 
III, of England, and for political reasons 
lied to the United States. He was the pos- 
sessor of a large fortune, which the family 
never received. After his marriage, the 
Doctor's father engaged in farming in Dim- 
mick township. La Salle county, and was 
one of the large land owners of his locality. 
Although he gave strict attention to his 
business affairs he never neglected his duties 
to his fellow men, and took a very active 
part in education and church work, ably 
seconding his father in the support of the 
feeble little church at La Salle. He was a 
member of the official board throughout life 



and after his father's death was its strong- 
est mainstay for forty years. He was hon- 
ored with all the township offices. He died 
in La Salle county, December 31, 1892, and 
the mother of our subject departed this life 
in 1856, leaving two children, the younger 
being Robert, now a resident of Koszta, 
Iowa. 

Dr. Long began his education in the dis- 
trict schools near his boyhood lujme. and at 
the age of fifteen years entered the academic 
department of Wheaton College at W'heaton, 
Illinois, where he was a student for two 
years. In 1866 he entered the Illinois Wes- 
leyan University at Bloomington, where he 
was graduated with the degree of B. S., in 
1873, being president of the class organi- 
zation during his senior year. In the mean- 
time he had engaged in teaching schools, 
and after leaving college followed that pro- 
fession for three years as principal at Mack- 
inaw. Stanford and Homer, Illinois. 

Having decided to make the practice of 
medicine his life work. Dr. Long matricu- 
lated at Hahnemann Medical College, Chi- 
cago, in itS75. and was graduated with the 
degree of M. J)., at the Chicago Homeo- 
pathic Medical College in 1878. He is now 
the leading homeopathic physician of Pon- 
tiac, and enjoys a large general practice. 
He served as United States pension examiner 
under Presidents FLiyes and Arthur, doing 
all the work in that line for the county, there 
being no pension board at the time. In 1880 
he was elected coroner of Livingston county 
and served by re-election eight years, dur- 
ing which time lie held the inquests made 
necessary by the terrible Chatsworth wreck 
when seventy-four Niagara excursionists 
l<:st their lives. He is an honored member of 
the Illinois Homeopathic Medical Associa- 
tion, of which he was i)rovisional secretary 



76 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



two terms, ending in May, 1899, and is also 
an active member of the Central Illinois 
Homeopathic Association. He is medical 
examiner for the Modern Woodmen of 
America at Pontiac. 

Dr. Long has been twice married, iiis 
first wife being Miss Martha \'eimont. who 
died ]\Iarch 20, 1884, leaving two children, 
v.-ho are still living, namely: Eva Mary, 
now attending the Northwestern University 
at Evanston, Illinois, and Archibald V., at 
home. For his second wife he married Lida 
Sterry, daughter of C. \V. Sterry, of Pon- 
tiac, and to them have been born two chil- 
dren : Christopher Sterry and Katherine. 
The family have a I)eautiful home at Xo. 
304 East Water street, Pontiac. 

From the start Dr. Long has served as 
secretary of the Pontiac Riverview Chau- 
tauqua Association, wliich is to-day one of 
the most successful organizations of the kind 
in the west, financially and otherwise, and 
he is also a trustee of the Illinois Wesleyan 
University at Bloomington, and also trustee 
of the board of finance for the same institu- 
tion. With such ancestry it is not strange 
that the Doctor takes a very active and 
prominent part in church work and lias al- 
v.ays lieen willing tii contribute liis share to 
any enterprise for the puljlic good. He is 
one of the leading and influential members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church of Ponti- 
ac, and is now the oldest member of its offi- 
cial board in point of continuous service, 
having held some office for the past twenty- 
two years. After serving eight years as su- 
perintendent of the Sunday school, he re- 
signed that position to become superintend- 
ent of tlie primary department, which has de- 
^■eloped ra|)i(lly during the seven vears he 
has been in charge, the enrollment at pres- 
ent being two hundred and fiftv. He was 



also secretary of the Livingston county 
Sunday School Association seven years; 
was chairman of the executive committee 
a numlier of years : vice-president of the 
third Illinois district, and has been chairman 
of the finance committee a number of years. 
At the age of thirteen he was elected sec- 
retary of the Sunday school, which he at- 
tended, and has since been officially con- 
nected with Sunday school work. He was 
a lay delegate to the general conference of 
tlie ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, at Cleve- 
land, in 1896, and at Chicago, in May, 1900, 
and for four years was president of the Lay 
Association of the central Illinois conference. 
He is also editor of the Pontiac Methodist, 
with which he has been connected from its 
beginning, in 1896, As a physician he 
ranks among the ablest, and as a citizen he 
stands deservedly high in public esteem, be- 
ing honored and respected liy all who know 
him. 



AUSTIN GIBBONS. 

Austin Giljbiius. cif Dwight. was Ijorn in 
ci'unt}' Mayo. Ireland. January 5, 1846, a 
son of PhiUp and Bridget (McDonald) 
(iilabons. also natives of that county. The 
father was born December 10, 18 19, and 
continued to make his liome in county Mayo 
until his emigration to America in j\Iarch, 
1851. For three years the family made their 
home in New York state and in 1854 came 
tc Illinois. locating first in Kendall county 
and remii\-ing to Li\'ingston county in 1865. 
Here the father purchased a half-section of 
1,-ind in Nevada township, which he operated 
eighteen years, and then moved to Chicago, 
where he has since made his home. He is 
liighly respected and esteemed and is a de- 




AUSTIN GIBBONS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



79 



vout member of the Cathcilic churcli. to 
wliicli his wife also belonged. She died in 
the fall of 1899, at the age of eighty years. 
In their family were nine children, all of 
whom are still living, namely : Mary, a 
resident of Chicago; Austin, our subject; 
Margaret, widow of Denslow Marsh and a 
resident of Pittsburg, Kansas ; Ellen, of 
Chicago; John, of Barton county, Missouri; 
I'hilip. Jane. Sarah and Thomas, all of Ciii- 
cago. 

Our subject was only four years old 
wlien brought to this country by his parents 
and his education was begun in X'ew York 
state, though the greater part of it was ob- 
tained in the schools of Kendall county, Il- 
linois. At the age of twenty-two he started 
out in life for himself by learning the trade 
of bridge builder and carpenter, which he 
followed twelve years. During this time he 
made his home in Nevada township, Liv- 
ingston county, and on retiring from that 
business, in 1877, he engaged in farming on 
section 2, that township, where he purchased 
eighty acres of land. To this he added one 
hundred and sixty acres in 1896, making a 
tine farm of two hundred and forty acres, 
which he placed under a high state of cul- 
tivation. In connection with general farm- 
ing he always gave considerable attention to 
stock raising, his specialty being Xorman 
horses. 

In 1897 Mr. Gibbons commenced buying 
grain for Edmund Mezger. of Dwight. and 
continued in his employ until that gentleman 
failed in business in March, 1898, when he 
entered the employ of William Pope, who 
llien took the elevator, remaining with him 
until the fall of 1899, when Mr. Pojje sold 
out to Merritt Brothers, of Dwight, by whom 
Mr. Giblwns has been retained as manager 
of the elevator. That fall he built a pleas- 



ant residence at the corner of W'aupansie 
and Xorth Clinton streets. Dwight, and in 
the spring of 1900 ttxik un his residence 
there, having remained on his farm up to 
that time. 

On the 6th of January. 1878, Mr. Gib- 
bons married Miss Margaret Kane, a native 
of Wisconsin and a daughter of Robert and 
Ann Kane, of that state, where her father 
died a number of years ago. Her mother 
met her death in the tornado at St. Paul, 
Minnesota, in 1893. ^^""S- Gibbons was their 
only child. Our subject and his wife have 
a family of fi\e children : Nellie, now the 
wife of William Neville, a farmer of Good 
Farm township, Grundy county, Illinois, by 
whom she has one child, Frank ; Frank, son 
of our subject and his father's assistant in 
the grain business in Dwight; and Annie, 
Philip and Saraii. students in the public 
schtwls of Dwight. 

Religiously Ixnh Mr. and Mrs. Gibbons 
are members of the Catholic church of 
Dwight. He has always been a stanch sup- 
porter of the men and measures of the Dem- 
ocratic party and taken an active and promi- 
nent part in local politics for a number of 
years. He was assessor of Nevada town- 
ship in 1 87 1 and 1872 and served as super- 
vfsor of that township for more than twenty 
vears, whicii office he filled continuously un- 
til the spring of 1900, when, owing to his 
removal to Dwight, the township was forced 
to seek another rejiresentative. His long 
retention in office plainly indicates his effi- 
cient service and the confidence and trust 
reix)sed in him by his fellow citizens. He 
\\ as chairman of the board in 1897 and 1898 
and was one of the special committee to 
oversee the building of the county house, 
which was built during his term at a cost 
of seventv-five thousanil tloilars. He was 



8o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



chairman of tlie Imard of equalization for 
sixteen consecutive years and served on 
most of tlie committees, especially the more 
important ones. He was school treasurer 
for ten years prior to his removal to Dwight 
and the cause of education always found. in. 
him a faithful friend. In 1892 he was the 
Democratic candidate from his district for 
member of the state Ijoard (.)f equalization 
and althoueh he failed of election he suc- 
ceeded in reducing the usual Republican ma- 
jority from twenty-five hundred to five hun- 
dred, a fact which testifies strongly as to 
his personal popularity. At present writ- 
ing he is the nominee of his party from the 
twentieth district as a member of the legis- 
lature. No man in his community is mor^ 
highly respected or esteemed, and he has 
been called upon to settle a number of es- 
tates in Livingston, \\'ill and Grundy coun- 
ties., and is now in charge of three estates 
as executor and administrator. 



S. H. POTTER, D. D. S. 

S. H. Potter, D. D. S., a prominent and 
successful dentist of Dwight, Illinois, was 
born on the 7th of July, 1874, in Sheldon, 
Iroquois county, this state, and is a son of 
M. G. and Mahala ((iriswold) Potter, na- 
tives of New York state and pioneers of Iro- 
quois county. Illinois. In early life the fa- 
ther engaged in farming and as a progressive 
and enterprising agriculturist he met with 
marked success, becoming owner of some 
fi\e hundred acres of valuable land in that 
county. Having secured a handsome prop- 
erty he moved to Sheldon, in 1881, and has 
since lived a retired life, enjoying the fruits 
of former toil. In his family were ten chil- 
dren, nine of whom are still living. 



Of this family Dr. Potter is ninth in 
order of birth. He received his literary eil- 
ucation in the public schools of Sheldon and 
was graduated from the high school of that 
])lace. In 1893 he entered the Northwestern 
Dental College, of Chicago, where he pur- 
sued the regular course and was graduated 
in April, 1896, with the degree of D. D. S. 
That same month he came to Dwight and 
opened an office. Although he met with 
strong opposition from his competitors, he 
was not discouraged, and, as his skill and 
ability were soon widely recognized, he was 
not long in building up the excellent practice 
w hich he now enjoys. He is especially pro- 
ficient in bridge and crown work and has met 
with remarkable success. His younger 
brother, Edgar C, was graduated at the 
Northwestern Dental College, May i, 1900, 
and is now engaged in practice with our sub- 
ject, under the firm name of Potter Brothers. 
Politically, the Doctor is identified with 
the Republican party, and socially, affiliated 
with Hebron Lodge, No. 176, K. P., of 
Dwight. 



JOHN O. JOHNSON. 

John O. Johnson, whose home is on sec- 
tion 29, Esmen township, has been identified 
with the agricultural interests of Li\'ingston 
county since July, 1857, and has borne an 
acti\-e part in its development and progress. 
He comes from across the sea, for he was 
born in Norway, November i, 1835, and is 
a son of John and Martha (Iverson) John- 
son, who spent their entire lives as farming 
people in that country. The father was four 
times married, and our subject is the young- 
est of the five children, two sons and three 
daughters, liorn of the second union. He 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and a sister are now tlie only survivors. He 
was reared on a farm and had fair common 
sclmol ad\antages. His knowledge of the 
linglish language has all been obtained 
through his own efiforts since his emigra- 
tion to .America. 

Before leaving Norway. Mr. Johnson 
was married, in April. 1856. to Miss Caro- 
line Mitchell, also a native of that country, 
and the following year they came to the new 
world, taking passage on a sailing vessel at 
Stovanger and reaching Quebec, Canada, 
after a voyage of six weeks. They crossed 
the lakes to Chicago and proceeded at once 
to La Salle county, this state, where friends 
from Xorwa\- had ])reviously located. Soon 
afterward, they came to Livingston county 
and located in the town of Auiity, where they 
made their home while Mr. Johnson worked 
by the day or month as a farm hand four or 
five years. He next rented land, and in 1864 
bought eighty acres of the farm in Esmen 
township, where he now resides. At that 
time it was wild prairie with no improve- 
ments, but he built thereon a small house 
and soon placed the land under excellent cul- 
tivation. He has since purchased an ad- 
joining eighty-acre tract, and the whole has 
been converted into a well-improved farm. 
He has tiled and fenced the land, has erected 
a good residence and substantial outbuild- 
ings, and has set out fruit and shade trees. 
In 1893 he bought another place of forty 
acres on section 29, Esmen townshij), where 
be now lives, and he has since made many 
imijrovements upon that farm. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson ha\c been born 
seven children, namely: Isabel and Martha, 
twins, the former of whom died at the age 
of seven years, the latter now the wife of 
James Street, of Hamilton county, Iowa; 
Mitchell, who is married and engaged in 



farming in Minnesota ; John, who is married 
and assists in the operation of his father's 
farius; Dora, wife of Oliver Henderocker, 
of Hamilton county, Iowa; Isabel, wife of 
James Jacobson. a farmer of South Dakota, 
antl Theodore, who died at the age of three 
years. 

Since casting his first ]iresidcntial vote 
for Abraham Lincoln, in 1864, Mr. John- 
son has been an ardent Republican in ])olitics, 
and has given his support to every enter- 
])rise which be believed would prove of pub- 
lic benefit. He served one year as road com- 
missioner and was a member of the school 
l)oard three years, but has never sought 
official honors. Religiously, both he and his 
wife are members of the Lutheran cliurch 
and are highly respected and esteemed by 
all who know them. 



GEORC.E SKIXXER. 

The deserved reward of a well-spent life 
is an honored retirement from business in 
which to enjoy the fruits of former tnil. 
I'o-day, after a useful and beneficial career, 
Mr. Skinner is cpiietly living at his beautiful 
home in I'ontiac. surrounded b\' the comfort 
that earnest labor has brought him. 

Mr. Skinner was born in Troy. Ohio, 
Deceml)er 5. 1822, a son of Joseph M. and 
]-ydia (Stillwell) Skinner. His paternal 
grandfather was George Skinner, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier, who was born in l'"ranklin 
comUy. Pennsylvania, in May, 1761, and 
there was married, Se])tember 23. 1789, to 
Susanna l-"reeman. who was born in April, 
1759. .\t an earlv dav they floated down 
the Ohio river to Cincinnati, and located 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
near Milford, Oliio, one mile from Camp 
Dennison, \vhich place is still in possession 
of the family. There the grandfather died 
in 1853. his wife in 1849. 

Joseph M. Skinner, father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Franklin county, Pennsyl- 
vania. January 25, 1795, and accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Ohio, where 
he grew to manhood, remaining at home 
until he attained his majority. On the 27th 
of September, 1820, he married Lydia Still- 
well, who was born in New Jersey, January 
24. 1792. As a young man he built many 
mills in the unbroken forests of Ohio. On 
leax'ing the parental roof, he went to Troy, 
that state, and entered a general mercantile 
store, later becoming a leading merchant and 
prominent business man of that section. He 
engaged in pork packing through the winter 
months and also shipped produce quite ex- 
tensi\-ely down the Miami, Ohio and Mis- 
sissippi rixers to New Orleans. At that 
time it required three months to go to New 
York, buy goods and convey them to his 
store, as the trip had to be made with horses. 
A'alue (if mone}' was unstalile and postage 
on a letter amounted to twenty-five cents. 
Mr. Skinner owned the first freight boat at 
Troy, which proved of great benefit to the 
township, and he was extensively engaged 
in the freighting business for some years. 
Later he owned and conducted a branch store 
■ at Covington, Ohio, and when the canal was 
completed engaged in the commission and 
shipping business, owning and running boats 
on the canal, while he left his partner in 
charge of the store at Tro}-. General Har- 
rison was present at the opening of the canal, 
and our subject well remembers that import- 
ant occasion. The father had served in the 
war of 1812 under that general, was a strong 



Whig and anti-sla\ery man, but never an 
office seeker. For many years he was an 
elder in the Presbyterian church and also a 
Mason, but during the Morgan trouble, he 
was forced, bv public opinion of the church, 
to withdraw from the order. He died Sep- 
tember 12, 1869, and his wife passed away 
December 19, i860. 

Our subject was educated in a subscrip- 
tion school at Troy, and during his youth 
assisted in his father's store. Later he com- 
menced to learn the tanner's trade at Cov- 
ington, Ohio, where he remained one year. 
Later, Mr. McCorkle, the leading tanner of 
Troy, dying, he took charge of the business, 
his father being administrator of the estate. 
In 1 85 1 he went to Louisville, Kentucky, 
where he was engaged in the ice business, 
being the first man to bring northern ice into 
that city. This he shipped down the Ohio 
ri\er. He was living there during the great 
American, or "Knownothing" mob, of 1856, 
but that summer he was forced to give up his 
business on account of failing health, and 
came to Livingston county. Illinois. He 
purchased two hundred and ten acres of 
land in Odell township, near the station of 
Cayuga, and in the spring of 1857 brought 
his family to their new home. They often 
tra\-eled ten or fifteen miles without seeing 
a single habitation of any sort, and wolves 
were still quite numerous in this region. 
Mr. Skinner's land was still in its primitive 
condition when he located thereon, but he 
soon broke and tiled it, and erected good 
and substantial buildings, making it one of 
the most desirable farms of its size in the 
count}-. Though he still owns the place, he 
has made his home in Pontiac for the past 
twelve years, and has a fine brick residence 
here, which is supplied with many comforts 
and luxuries. In connection with general 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



83 



farming lie always engaged in stock raising, 
and while living in the country served as 
school director, but would never accept po- 
litical positions. 

In the fall of 1862 Mr. Skinner returned 
to his old home in Trov, Ohio, where he re- 
mained two years. As a young man he 
had lieen a member of the La Fayette Blues 
of that place, an infantry companv that 
drilled all over the state, and in May, 1864, 
he joined the Home Guards as a member of 
Company K, One Hundred and Forty-sev- 
enth Ohio Infantry. They first went to 
Camp Dennison, Ohio, and from there to 
Fort Alorrisy, A\'ashington, D. C, where 
they were stationed at the attack of General 
Ewell, the last" attempt of the rebels to cap- 
ture the capital. Mr. Skinner remained 
there until the close of his term of eunlist- 
ment and was mustered out at Camp Denni- 
son. 

On the i_nh of April, 1849, ^I''- Skin- 
ner was united in marriage with Miss Eliza- 
eth Shafer, who was born Xovember 15, 
1829, a daughter of Eckert and Rachel 
(Smith) Shafer. Her father was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, December 
29, 1804, a son of George and Barbara 
Shafer, and was reared in Earl township, 
Lancaster county, between that city and 
Philadelphia. His father was of German 
descent and a soldier of the Revolutionary 
war. Mrs. Skinner's mother was born at 
New Holland, Pennsylvania, j\Iarch 25, 
1809, a daughter of Edward Smith. After 
following farming in his native state for sev- 
eral years Eckert Shafer left there in the 
spring of 1847, accompanied by his wife 
and six children, and moved to Troy, Ohio, 
by way of the canal and Ohio river. He 
bought a farm two miles from Troy, where 
his wife died March 7, 1854. Later he came 



to Livingston county, Illinois, and purchased 
hind in Esmen township, to the improxemtn 
and culti\ation of which he devoted his en- 
ergies until after his children were all mar- 
ried. He then made his home with his eld- 
est child, Mrs. Skinner, dying there Decem- 
ber 13, 1882. 

Mr. and Mrs. Skinner have a family of 
nine children, namely : Loretta, wife of John 
J. Pfau, of Odell; Clara L., wife of Joseph 
French, of Indiana, by whom she has one 
daughter, Edna May; Elias Freeman, now 
a resident of Missouri ; Rachel L., who mar- 
ried James Jones, of Streator, Illinois, and 
they have three chil(Jren; Martha L., who 
married J. W. Adams, traveling passenger 
agent for the Vanderbilt lines, and a resi- 
dent of San Francisco, and they have four 
children, Xona L., Nina L., George J. and 
Harry \'.; Eckert, also a resident of Cali- 
fornia ; Joseph Morris, who married Minnie 
Streator, has one child, Irma, and operates 
the home farm near Cayuga; Luella and 
Emma L., at home. 

Both our subject and his wife are active 
members of the Presbyterian church. He 
assisted in organizing the church at Cayuga, 
and was one of the leading contributors to 
the erection of the house of worship there. 
He also served as elder of the church at 
Louisville, Kentucky, and has filled that of- 
fice ever since in ditiferent societies with 
which he has been connected. He was most 
of the time superintendent of the Sunday 
school during his residence at Cajuga, and 
has never missed in his attendance at Sun- 
day school or church since coming to Pon- 
tiac. His life has been exemplary in all re- 
spects, and it is safe to say that no man in 
his community is held in higher regard or is 
more deserving the respect and esteem of his 
fellow men than George Skinner. He has 



84 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



been an acti\e \v(irker for tlie Republican 
party anil its principles, but lias never been 
an aspirant for office. 



JOHN Kl'LL. 



It is astonisbing to witness tbe success 
of men wbo bave emigrated to America 
witbout capital and from a position of com- 
parative oliscurity ba\e worked tbeir way up- 
\\ard to a position of i)roniinence. Tbe read- 
iness witb wbicb tbe}' adapt tliemselves to 
circumstances and take advantage of op- 
portunities offered brings to tbem success 
and wins tbem a place among tbe leading- 
business men of tbe community in wbicb 
tbey reside. No better illustration of tbis 
can be found tlian in tbe life of Jobn Kull, 
tbe well known proprietor of tbe Pontiac 
Steam ]\Iill and manager of a meal and feed 
store on 'tbe Alton Railroad and Water 
street. Pontiac, of wbicb place be bas l)een a 
resident since October ii, 1894. 

Mr. Kull was born in Niederlenz, Canton 
Argau. nortbeastern Switzerland, October 5, 
1834, a son of Jobn Kull, a baker by trade, 
wbo spent bis entire life tbere. Our subject 
attended scbool tbere. but tbe times being- 
bard be commenced work at the early age of 
nine years witb the hope of being of some as- 
sistance to his parents. He entered the spin- 
ning room of a cotton factory, where he 
worked from six in tbe morning until nine 
at night, witb only an. hour each day for 
dinner, and received only the ecpiivalent to 
one dollar per month in our money. When 
all tired out with tbe day's work he had to 
walk a distance of three miles to his home 
before getting his supper. In the winter 
he put in six hours of school work each day 



during the six years spent in tbe cotton fac- 
tory. At the end of that time be liegan serv- 
ing a tbree-_\-ears api)renticesbip to tbe mil- 
ler's trade with bis uncle, and while thus 
employed recei\ed onh- his board and clothes 
in compensation for his labor, but be thor- 
oughly learned the business and at the age of 
eighteen bad a good trade, having passed the 
exan-iination and received his papers. 

\\'ishing to see more of tbe country Mr. 
Kidl traveled over Switzerland and Ger- 
luany, working in mills in all of tbe import- 
ant cities of those countries. He also spent 
some time in France and learned to handle 
and put together tbe French Ijurrs, this be- 
ing an iniportant part ijf bis trade. By 
working in so many different mills he gained 
a varied knowledge of the methods in use 
and became an expert miller. Returning to 
Basal, Switzerland, one of the largest cities 
of his native land, he served as head miller 
in its largest mill for three years to the en- 
tire satisfaction of tbe owners. 

In April, 1867, Mr. Kull came to the 
United States, landing in New York after 
a fifteen-days yoyage in a steamer with an 
excellent knowledge of a good trade, but 
unable to speak a word of English. Coming 
directly to Highland, Illinois, he served as 
miller there for a time, and then went to 
Pocahontas, Illinois, where he was similarly 
employed for three years. He then removed 
to Green\-ille, Boone county, Illinois, and 
took charge of a mill for J. E. \\'alls, an 
-English gentleman, wbo wanted la first- 
class, practical miller. .\11 of tbe employees 
of tbe mill being Americans but liimself, he 
learned the English language more reachly 
than had ever before been necessary, and 
this has since been of great advantage to 
him. From Greenville he went to Litch- 
field, Illinois, and other places throughout 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



!5 



tliis state, and also various ])laces in eastern, 
southwestern and northwestern Missovn^i. 
Sulise(|uently he had charge of some of tlio 
liest mills in Kansas. On the ist of Octo- 
lier. 1894, he came to Pontiac. Illinois, to 
take chartfe of tlie I'ontiac Steam Mill for j'. 
!•;. W'uerpel & Company, of St. l,nuis. and 
in March, 1897, purchased the mill, which 
he has since successfully conducted on his 
own account, having huilt uj) a good busi- 
ness. He has the leading custom trade of 
the city, receivintr the patronage of all the 
extensive farmers of this section of the coun- 
ty who have grain t(j grind. He is also gen- 
eral agent for the Jersey Lily flour, made hy 
Jennison Mrothers & Compan}-. of Janesville, 
.Minnesota, and has huilt up a tine whole- 
sale and retail trade, as the Hour is of a su- 
perior (|uality and gives excellent satisfac- 
tion. As a wholesale dealer he sells in car- 
load lots. In the spring of 1900 he equipped 
his mill with electric motors and now very 
successfully uses electricty for his motive 
])ower. He was the fir.st miller in this ))art of 
the county to adopt it and this shows the 
characteristic enterprise of the man. While 
by nature conservati\e, he is Aet ready to 
ado])t new ideas in his business and keep in 
the front. 

On the 1 8th of Jvme, 1867. in Pocahon- 
tas, Illinois, Mr. Kull married Miss Karo- 
line Bornhauser, who was born in \\ ein- 
felden. Canton Thurgau, Switzerland, and 
whci came to this country on the same ves- 
sel with him, joining her father, Jacob 
Bornhauser, a cabinetmaker by trade, who 
crossed the Atlantic in 1866. By this union 
has been born one daughter, Carrie. Mr. 
Kull and his wife are both earnest members 
lit the Presbyterian church and he is a 
Democrat in ]K)litics. He is enterprising 
and progressive and gives his support to any 



object he believes will prove of public bene- 
fit. He was one of the men who felt the 
need nf a bridge at Xermillion street. He 
got U]) the petition and secured a suhscrij)- 
tion of nine hundred dollars from citizens 
and also a good one fmm the Chicago & 
.\lton Railroad (."ompany. With such a 
hacking the council jxissed the ordinance and 
ajipropriated twenty-five hundred dollars to 
the enterprise, while the board of supervisors 
ga\e one thousand dollars. So Mr. Kull 
was realley the founder of the bridge, which 
is a great improvement to the western part 
of the cit}-. Its need was long felt, hut it 
reiiuiretl an active and energetic man like 
Mr. Kull to carry the enterprise through 
successfullv. 



WILHELM r.lSCHOFF. 

Wilhelm l^)ischoft', an industrious and en- 
ter])rising agriculturist residing on section 
14, .\\oca townshi]). Livingston county, is a 
native of Illinois. hi< birth liaving occurred 
in Ttiwanda ti>wnshi]), McLean county. Feb- 
ruary 3, iH(>j. His parents, Ludwig and 
.Mary ( .Allendortif ) BischotY, were both na- 
tives of Germany and caiue to America when 
young, about 1830. Their marriage was 
celebrated in Bloomington, Illinois, and in 
the vicinity nf Towanda, McLean county, 
thev began their domestic life upon a farm 
which Mr. Bisclvifif had rented. They re- 
mained residents of that county until coming 
to Livingston county in 1870. when they 
located on the farm now occupieil by our 
subject. The father purchased the property 
anil at once began to clear away the timber 
and break the land, having previously erected 
a small house suitable iov a home for the 
family. He died in 1893. li'iving survived 



86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his wife several years, her death occurring in 
1894. Both were consistent members of 
the Lutheran church, and he was a Repub- 
hcan in pohtics and an ardent worker for 
the party. In their family were five chil- 
dren, two sons and three daughters, but two 
died in childhood. Wilhelm, our subject, 
is the oldest of those who reached maturity ; 
Matilda is now the wife of Richard Mor- 
ton, who lives south of Fairbury; and Al- 
vena married F. Burley, of Pleasant Ridge 
township, and died in 1889. 

Wilhelm Bischoff came with the family 
to Livingston county and upon the home 
farm he grew to manhood, his education be- 
ing acquired in the district schools of Avoca 
township. He early became familiar' with 
the duties which fall to the lot of the agri- 
culturist and has never left the homestead, 
but carried on farming successfully with his 
father until the latter's death, since which 
time he has had entire charge of the place, 
consisting of one hundred and twenty acres 
of good land, nearly forty of which are 
covered with timber, while the remainder is 
under a high state of cultivation. He has 
added, by purchase, an eighty-acre tract, 
giving him a farm of two hundred acres. 
He is a thrifty and energetic farmer, and by 
these means has made a success of his labors. 
He raises hogs for the Chicago market and 
in all his undertakings has steadily pros- 
pered. 

In 1890 Mr. Bischoff was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary E. Funk, who was 
born August 22, 1869, in Morton, Illinois, 
and daughter of John and Christian Funk. 
Her parents, dying when she was an infant, 
left her in care of relati\es. with whom 
she made her home until reaching' woman- 
hood. She has a sister, Mrs. Christina Lu- 
cas, who resides in Stonington, Illinois. ^Ir. 



and Mrs. Bischoff have four children : Clar- 
ence L., Ethel Alae, Lester Er and Irving F., 
all attending the district school with ex- 
ception of the youngest. The parents are 
active members and liberal supporters of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Bis- 
choff is also a member of the Modern \\'ood- 
men Camp of Fairbury and the Court of 
Honor, in which later his wife is a member. 
He has always been a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party, but would never accept 
office or hold any public position, preferring 
that they should be given to men whom he 
considers more worthy of them. He is, 
however, public spirited and progressive and 
gives his support to those measures which he 
believes will prove of public benefit. 



JA':\IES .\. CALDWELL. 

Prominent among" the enterprising, ener- 
getic and progressive business men of Ponti- 
ac, Illinois, is the subject of this sketch, who 
is now devoting his time and attention to 
the real estate, insurance and abstract busi- 
ness. He was born in Charleston, ^\'est 
Virginia, March 22, 1831, a son of Joseph 
and Mary Ann (Adams) Caldwell. 

Joseph Caldwell, the progenitor of the 
family in the L'nated States, emigrated 
with his family from Derry, Ireland, m 
1769, and settled in Sherman's \'alley. 
Perry county, Pennsylvania. He was of 
Scotch descent. About 1780 he moved 
farther west, locating on Sewickley creek. 
Pennsylvania. He had five children, of 
whom Joseph, the eldest, was the great- 
grandfather of our subject. The grandfa- 
ther was James Caldwell, who was born in 
Ireland, February 21, 1759, and was about 




J. A. CALDWELL. 



THE JUUGKAi'HlLAL RECORD. 



ten years of age when lirouglit t(i America. 
He married Sarah Byram. wlio was born 
1 ehrn;ir\- i_^, 176,^ and was the eldest child 
of Ell ward Byrani. At an early day her 
father moved with his familv to the neigh- 
borhood of Fort Pitt, now Pittsburg. Penn- 
sylvania, and on the 7th of .\pril. 1779. dur- 
ing the Revtjlutionary war, he and one 
(laughter were captured by the Indians and 
taken to Canada, where they remained in 
ca])tivity for a year. The child was allowed 
t'l ride with the Indians on horseback a 
part (if the way. but Mr. Byram was com- 
pelled to walk. In i7<So they were taken to 
Montreal and later to Quebec, being in prison 
a*^ lx)th places, and finally, in the spring of 
1781. were transferred by boat with other 
English prisoners through Eake Cham- 
k plain and Lake (leorge, then down the Hud- 
1 sen river and on to Morristown, Xew Jersey. 
— their old home. 

The Byram family is traced back to 
Xicholas Byram, son of a gentleman of 
jirominence in Kent county. England. He 
was born in ]6[o. and as a boy was sent 
ir. charge of an agent to a remote school, 
but the agent t(3ok his g(jld and placed the 
boy on l)(jard a ship to the West Indies, 
where he was sold to pay his passage. Se- 
creted in his clothes was some gold given 
h.'m by his mother and with this he came 
I 1 Massachusetts Bay in 1633 or 1634. He 
settled in \\'eym(juth. Massachusetts. Ed- 
ward Byram, previously mentioned, was 
descended from John and Priscilla Alden 
in the fifth generation. For a more extended 
history of this family .see the book entitled 
"Abby Byram and her Father, the Indian 
Captives," published at Ottumwa. Iowa, in 
i8(jS. 

After his marriage James Caldwell, our 
subject's grandfather, became a farmer of 



Westmoreland county, Penn.sylvania. where 
hfc spent his life, dying there July 1 1. 1847. 
His wife passed away prior to 1833. He 
was a zealous Christian, strong and positive 
in his belief, and served as elder of the Se- 
wickley Pre.sbyterian church for some j-ears. 
Most of his sons adhered to that faith and 
the father of our subject was educated for 
the Presbyterian ministry. He was born 
ii' Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 
1786, and was a student at the college in 
Cannonsburg. that state, — the oldest college 
west of the mountains. In early manhood 
Ik removed to Charleston, West \'irginia, 
where he embarked in merchandising, and 
became one of the most prominent and suc- 
cessful business men of the place. He mar- 
ried Miss Mary ^\nn Adams, who was teach- 
ip.g schiool in Tennessee at that time. She was 
a nati\e of Weston. Massachusetts, and a 
granddaughter of Alpheus Bigelow, who as 
a Revolutionary soldier jjarticipated in the 
battle of Concord. On both sides she was 
descended from old Xew England families. 
She was born in j8i i and died in i<S(jo, hav- 
ing long survived her husband, who died at 
Charleston in 1848. Of their eight children 
who reached years of matin'ity our subject 
if the oldest. 

James A. Caldwell was about eighteen 
years of age at the time of his father's death ; 
he received a good academic education in his 
native city and began his business career as 
clerk in a drug store at Charleston, ^^'est 
\'irginia. where he continued to make his 
l.ome until 1865, covering the period of the 
Civil war. There he engaged in business for 
Inmself for a time. He first married, in 
i860. Miss Jennie Harxey, of Springfield, 
Ohio, a daughter of Captain John Harvey, 
but she died in 1873, leaviup- two children, 
one <-if whom, Jennie, is stiU Hving. 



90 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In July, 1865. Mr. Caldwell came to 
Fontiac, Illinois, and embarked in the drug- 
business on W^est Madison street in part- 
nership witli John A. Fellows, under the 
firm name of Fellows & Caldwell. They 
continued in business tog-ether for some 
3'ears and were finally succeeded by the firm 
of Caldwell & McGregor, who for twenty- 
five years carried on a most successful busi- 
ness, theirs being by far the oldest drug- store 
or business firm in the city. To their stock 
of drugs and books they later added jewelry 
and built up a good trade in that line. They 
built the block on the northeast corner of 
Mill and Madison streets, then the finest 
business block in the city, and also bought 
the opjxisite corner, and after selling the 
front part improved the remainder of the 
property. In 1895 the partnership was dis- 
solved and Mr. Caldwell retired from the 
drug trade. For about eighteen months he 
conducted a grocery store, and since dis- 
}X)sing of that has successfully engaged in 
the insurance and real estate business, hand- 
ling property for others as well as himself. 
After the dissolution of the firm of Fellows 
& Caldwell he bought lots 4 and 5 at the 
corner of Madison and Plum streets, which 
he subdivided into three business lots and 
sold to different parties. About 1880, in 
partnership with Mr. McGregor, he bought 
twenty feet front on the corner where the 
Sterry block now stands and sold it after- 
ward to C. W. Sterry. At the time of pur- 
chase it was covered with a two-storv busi- 
ness house. Mr. Caldwell still owns six resi- 
dences in the city and has » nice home at 
the corner of Mill and Grove streets. 

In September, 1874, Mv. Caldwell was 
again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Lovina Hill, of Pontiac, a daughter of 
G. E. Tibbets, who came here in 1866 from 



]\faine, which was the birthplace of Mrs. 
Caldwell. They are active members of the 
]:'resb}terian church, in which our subject 
is now serving as elder. Fie has been a 
member of the official board many years and 
was superintendent of the Sunday school 
some time. He always supported the Dem- 
ocratic party until the campaign of .1896, 
but could not endorse the principles advo- 
cated by the Chicago platform. He has made 
an untarnished record and unspotted reputa- 
tion as a liusiness man. In all ]3laces and 
under all circumstances he is loyal to truth, 
lionor and right, justly valuing his own 
self-resiject as infinitely more preferable than 
wealth, fame and position. His success has 
been the result of honest, persistent effort 
in the line of honorable and manly dealing. 



GEORGE \\'. \\-0:\IELDORFF. 

George \\'. \\"omeldorff, one of the high- 
ly respected citizens and successful farmers 
of Eppards Point township, residing on sec- 
tion ^^, is a native of Illinois, born near 
Tremont, Tazewell county, February 22, 
1846. His father, Daniel Womeldorff, was 
born in Gallia county, Ohio, in 1804, and 
there married Miss Harriet X. Kerr, a na- 
ti\-e of the same county and a daughter of 
[Major John M. Kerr, an officer of the war 
of 1812. After his marriage Mr. Womel- 
dorff followed farming in Ohio until 1844, 
when he came to Illinois and settled in Taze- 
well county. For about four years he was 
engaged in flat-boating down the ^Mississippi 
to New Orleans, and then turned his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits, having pur- 
chased a claim in Tazewell county. Upon 
that place he died in 1852. Subsequently 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



91 



liis widow tiiok lier f'aniih' liack to Oliio. 
locating in tlie old ncighl)orliood in Gallia 
county. 

There our subject grew to manhood and 
attended the common schools. On the 25th 
of March. 1863, at the age of seventeen 
years, he joined the hoys in blue of the Civil 
war. enlisting as a i)rivate in Company L, 
Se\enth Ohio Cavalry, which was assigned 
to the Army of the Tennessee, under com- 
mand of General Sherman. He participated 
in the battle of Stone River, the engage- 
ments of the Atlanta campaign, and then 
with his command went to the relief of Gen- 
eral Thomas at Nashville. They were in 
the battle of Franklin and followed Hood 
to the Tennessee river. At (ira\ely Springs, 
Alabama, Mr. \\'omcldiirff was severely 
wounded, being shot in the left fore-arm and 
left side and receiving a saber thrust in the 
right leg and a scratch on the right shoulder. 
He was sent to a hospital boat at Waterloo 
on the Tennessee river, and fourteen days 
later was taken to Jeffersonville, Indiana, 
where he remained in the hospital until June 
5, 1865, when honorably discharged from the 
service, though his wounds did not heal for 
nearly a year after his return home. 

Mr. Wonieldorff then attended a select 
school for nine months and engaged in farm- 
ing in Ohio for a year, but in the fall of 1867 
he returned to Tazewell count}'. Illinois, in 
company with his mother, youngest brother 
and sister. They drove the entire distance 
and located in Treniont. For eighteen 
months our subject was employed as over- 
seer of a farm and in 1869 came to Livings- 
ton county, operating a rented farm in Pike 
township for three years, while his mother 
and sister kept house for him. 

In that township Mr. W'omeldorfY was 
married, March 18. 1873, to Miss Maria C. 



Beeks, a native of Pennsvhania and a daugh- 
ter of J.imes n. r.ceks, wlio nio\ed to Mar- 
shall county, Illinois, in 1853, and later to 
Livingston county, but is now a resident of 
Arkansas City, Kan.sas. Of the twelve chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Wonieldorff five 
died in infancy. Those living are Eula, 
wife of John \\". l-'arlcy, of E])])ards Point 
township; Eugene, at home; Delia, wife of 
x\lbert D. Hewitt, of Pontiac ; Gilbert, Min- 
nie, Ethel and Bertel, all at home. Air. 
Womeldorff's mother died at his home De- 
cember j8, 1898, at the aihanced age of 
eighty-four years. 

Inir two years after his marriage our 
suliject continued to engage in farming upon 
rented land in Pike township, where he sub- 
seciuently purchased a tract of eighty acres. 
This he sold six years later and bought one 
himdred acres in the same townshi]). u])on 
which he also resided six years. ( )n dis- 
posing of that property, in 1887, he Iiought 
his present farm of two hundred acres on 
section 33, Eppards Point township, to which 
he has subsequently added a forty-acre tract. 
He has made many useful and valuable im- 
provements upon the place, and now has one 
of the most desirable farms of its size in the 
township. Starting out in life for himself 
empty-handed, his career illustrates what can 
be accomplished through industry, perse- 
verance, good management ami a determina- 
tion to succeed. 

While with the army at Atlanta. Georgia, 
in 1864, Mr. Wonieldorff cast his lirst pres- 
idential vote for Lincoln and has since been 
a stanch supporter of the Republican party. 
He has served his fellow citizens as super- 
visor and is now filling the office of town- 
shi]) trustee. He has also been school di- 
rector for thirteen years and president of his 
district in both Pike and Eppards Point town- 



92 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ships. Religiously he and all his family, 
with the exception of the youngest sun. are 
members of the ^^lethodist Episcopal church 
at Weston. McLean county, and take an ac- 
tive part in church and Sunday school work. 
He is a prominent member of the Grand 
Army Post at Chenoa, in which he has 
served as commander and is now vice-com- 
mander. In times of peace as well as in war 
he is recognized as a most patriotic and 
useful citizen, and is held in high regard l)y 
all with whom he comes in contact, either in 
business or social life. 



LESTER EDWIX KENT. 

Lester Edwin Kent, a retired grain deal • 
er and a prominent early settler of Pontiac, 
was born in SuffieUl, Hartford county, Con- 
necticut, August 1 8, 1834, a son of Edwin 
and Huldah ( Tewett) Kent, also natives of 
that state, his ancestors being among its 
pioneers. The father was of English ex- 
traction and of good Revolutionary stock. 
He was a farmer of Suffield and a man of 
considerable prominence in his community, 
serving as selectman and road commissioner. 
There both he and his wife died. She was 
a consistent member of the Baptist church. 

Our subject was educated in the common 
schools and academy of his native town and 
remained at home until he attained his ma- 
jority. In 1855 he came west to Chicago, 
Illinois, but first located in Kane county, 
having a cousin living at Kaneville, where 
he spent one year. In the fall of 1856 he 
came to Pontiac and entered the employ of 
Sidney A. Kent, a grain dealer and a very 
prominent man, wlio recently died in Chi- 
cago. While with him our subject became 



thoroughly familiar with the grain busi- 
ness in all its details, and in 1858 jjurchased 
the elevator in Pontiac and embarked in the 
business on his own account. The elevator 
was located on the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
road, which was then run by Governor Alat- 
teson. 

At that time grain was brought into Pon- 
tiac from distances of twenty or twenty-five 
miles, and as the wagons of the farmers 
would not hold shelled corn jMr. Kent fur- 
nished them with sacks. The elevators were 
often more than full and sacks would be 
piled up elsewhere like cord wood. It was 
sometimes impossible to get box cars to ship 
the grain and it had to be loaded on flat 
cars. Mr. Kent soon became interested in 
the grain business in other towns. He en- 
larged the elevator at Fairbury, when that 
place contained but one small house and 
store and before the railroad was built. He 
would drive over in the morning and back 
again at night. He built the first elevator 
at Odell, when it had but one store, and was 
instrumental in building up the town, as 
farmers bringing their grain to the elevator 
wished to do their trading there. At Odell 
the grain was shoveled into the cars at first. 
Mr. Kent also built the first elevators at Cay- 
uga and Blackstone, this county, where he 
also engaged in the lumber business, and 
for two vears shipped grain from Nevada, 
but did not build there. In those days he 
was the largest shipper on the Alton road, 
and would load full trains at both Pontiac 
and Blackstone : the road being short of cars 
they would run a train in for him to load 
immediately. He kept one man at Ocoya 
and furnished employment to a number of 
others most of the time. Most of his grain 
was shipped to Chicago. For over twenty- 
five years he continued to be at the head of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



93 



tlie grain trade in this county and gave liis 
attention entirely to that l)usine.ss. He ad- 
vanced nmney Hl)erally to farmers in need 
of assistance when starting out. and was of 
great help to I'ontiac in hringing trade here, 
as well as to the other towns where he had 
elevators. 

Mr. Kent was also one of the original 
stockholders of the Pontiac National Bank 
and served as its vice-president fi^r a numher 
of years. At one time he owned and op- 
erated a distillery and was engaged in cat- 
tle feeding. He went intc^ the fi^rnier husi- 
ness to assist a man in difficult}', knowing 
nothing of the business, and got into trouble 
with the government, as the ta.xes were not 
paid, but owing to his influence and it being 
ascertained that the delinquency was prior 
to his taking possession he was soon cleared. 
He cld.sed the distillery, but fed cattle for 
some years, doing a big business in that line. 
shipping in cattle from Chicago. 

Mr. Kent married Miss .Antoinette 
Ciraves. of Joliet. and they ha\'e one daugh- 
ter, Mary L.. wife of \ictor Pearre, of Pon- 
tiac. by whom she has two children. William 
I'ayson and Kent .\lden. He attends and 
supports the Ejiiscopal church, of which his 
family are meml)ers. .\bout 1865 he pur- 
chased a half-block at Xo. 206 North Court, 
opposite the park, which property he still 
owns and occupies, it ha\ing been imjiroved 
by him. In 1894 he retired from acti\e busi- 
ness and is now enjoying a well earned rest. 

Socially Mr. Kent is a member of Pon- 
tiac lodge. Xo. J(j4. V. & .\. M.. and be- 
longs to the chapter, council and St. Paul's 
Commandery. all of Fairbury. He has al- 
ways affiliated with the Republican party, 
casting his first presidential vote for l-'re- 
mont in 1856. He served as alderman from 
the second ward for four years and was in- 



strumental in getting seventy-five car-loads 
of stone put into the street from the court 
hou.se to the depot and also a sidewalk 
around the court house square. Having 
shipped .so much o\er the Chicago & Alton 
road he got Mr. Chappel to ship the stone 
free of freight charges. This stone made an 
excellent foundation for the city streets. He 
has taken an acti\-e interest in promoting 
the welfare of the town and county, en- 
couraging and aiding all enterprises tending 
tcj benefit the i)ublic. and enjoys in a high 
degree the confidence and esteem of his fel- 
low men. 



LEOXARl) \\"1:BF.R. 

Leonard ^^'eber, a representative agri- 
culturist of Pike township, residing on sec- 
lion 10. has made his home in Livingston 
county since 1869 and has taken an active 
part in its de\'elopment. He was born in 
Xew York February 2, 1850, and is a son 
of ( "leorge Weber, w ho was l)orn in Wurtem- 
burg, CJermany, about 1822. and emigrated 
to the L'nited States when a young man, 
locating near L'tica, Xew York, where he 
married Sophia Horner, also a native of 
Wurtemburg. Her father died in Germany 
and she came to America at the .same time 
as her future husband. In this country Mr. 
Weber worked for others and also engaged 
in teaming in Xew York for some years, 
three of his children having been born in 
that state, but in 1856 he came to Illinois 
and first settled in Woodford county, where 
he engaged in farming on rented land for 
several years. At length he was able to pur- 
chase a small place in the southern part of 
the county, and on disposing of the same, 
in 1869, he bought a farm of one hundred 



94 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and sixty acres in Pike township. Livings- 
ton county, which at that time was but sHght- 
ly improved. After operating it for several 
years he sold and bough.t another place in 
Pike townsliip, which he subsequently dis- 
posed of, and now makes his home in Pon- 
tiac township, where he owns a \-aIuable 
farm of three hundred and twenty acres. 

The subject of this sketch was a lad of 
six years when he came to this state, and in 
Woodford and Livingston counties he grew 
to manhood, his education being acquired in 
the public schools near his home. He re- 
mained with his father until he attained his 
majority, and then rented a farm on section 
3. Pike township, where he engaged in farm- 
ing for about six years. Mr. ^^'ebcr was 
married in this county. April 2. 1878, to 
Miss Barbara Fischer, a native of W'oixlford 
county. Illinois, and a daughter of Joseph 
Fischer, a substantial farmer of Pike town- 
ship, Livingston county, who was formerly 
a resident of Woodford county and was born 
in Germany. Mrs. Weber was reared and 
educated in this ci^unty. Our subject and 
his wife Iia\e a family of three children : 
Barbara S.. Joseph G. ami Leonard F.. all 
at home. 

After his marriage ]\lr. \\'eber contin- 
ued to engage in farming upon rented land 
for about five years. He rented his present 
farm of one hundred and si.xty acres on sec- 
tion 10, Pike township, for two years and 
then purchased the place, to the further im- 
pr6vement and cultivation of which he has 
since devoted his energies. In his farming 
operations he is meeting with marked suc- 
cess and the prosperity that has come to him 
is certainly justly merited, for it is due en- 
tirely to his own unaided efforts and good 
management. Politically Mr. \\'eber is 
identified with the Democratic party on na- 



tional issues, but at local elections votes for 
the men whom he believes best qualified to 
fill the offices regardless of party lines. For 
three years he ser\-ed as school director. l)ut 
has never cared for political honors. Re- 
ligiously both he and jiis wife are members 
of the Evangelical church of Eppards Point. 



EDWWRD O. REED. 

Edward O. Reed, who for several years 
lias been prominently identified with the 
public afi^airs of Livingston county, and is 
now most acceptably serving as count}" treas- 
urer, Avas born in Bloomington, Illinois. June 
12, i860, a son of Captain Henry B. and 
Esther (Beck) Reed. The father is a native 
of Pennsylvania, born near Pottsville, 
Schuylkill county, January 29, 1833, and 
there grew to manhood and married. In 
early life he learned the shoemaker's trade, 
which he followed prior to the Civil war. 
On coming to Illinois, he settled in Xaper- 
ville, later spent a short time in Joliet. and 
then mc^ved to Bloomington. In the fall 
of i860 he came to Pontiac, where he was 
engaged in the shoe business mitil the follow- 
ing spring, when he enlisted in Compan}- D, 
Twentieth Illinois \^olunteer Infantry, with 
which he served initil after the Ijattle of 
Shiloh. On the field at Fort Donelson, he 
was promoted for gallant service to the rank 
of second lieutenant, and our subject now 
has in his possession a reward of merit is- 
sued bv (iovernor Yates. His term of en- 
listment having expired. Lieutenant Reed 
returned home. \Miile being paid off at St. 
Louis, the paymaster told the government 
needed such men as he and suggested that 
he see Governor Yates. This he failed to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



95 



do, but tlie Go\ernor sent for liini aiul asked 
him to help recruit three companies in tliis 
part of tlie state. He helped recruit five, 
and again went to tlie front as captain of 
Company G. One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Illinois A'olunteer Infantry. He was 
with Sherman on the march to the sea and 
remained in the service until the close of the 
war. participating in the grand review at 
\\'ashingt<)n. District of Columbia. Re- 
turning to his liome in Pontiac. he resumed 
the shoe business, which he carried on un- 
til appointed by Governor Oglesby as custo- 
dian of memorial hall in the state house at 
Springfield, and served four years at that 
time, being the first in the new hall and at- 
tending to the arranging of all the flags, 
etc. He proved a most capable official and 
\\as re-apijohited by Governor Fifer. He 
is an honored member and commander of T. 
Lytle Dickey Post, G. A. R.. also belongs to 
Pontiac Lodge. Xo. 294. F. & A. 'SI., and 
both lie and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He is now liv- 
ing a retired life in Pontiac. A nmre e.x- 
tended mention of this worthy gentleman 
may be fnuntl on another page of this vol- 
ume. 

Our subject was educated -in the public 
schools of Pontiac, and during his youth 
served an apjirenticeship to the cigarmaker's 
trade, at which he worked until twenty-seven 
years of age. when he formed a partnershij) 
with John C. Riess, luider the firm name of 
Reed & Riess, and started a manufactory of 
tlieir own, which they still conduct. They 
have met with marked success in the under- 
taking and furnish employment to six or 
eight men. Mr. Reed built up the trade as 
a traveling man. but the firm now sells their 
goods mainly to home consumers, in this 
county. He owns a good store building and 



a fine residence on South Mill street, where 
he makes his home. He was married, De- 
cember 15. 1897. to Miss Eunice Stott, a 
daughter of John Martin Stott, of Chicago, 
and they have one daughter, Esther. 

Since attaining his majority Mr. Reed 
has been an ardent Republican in politics 
and has taken a prominent and influential 
part in public affairs. He was serving as 
alderman from the third ward when the 
water works were put in and the sewer sys- 
tem adojued. the city being bonded to put in 
the sewers. Before his term expired he was 
elected assistant supervisor and was a mem- 
ber of the finance committee that found the 
ways and means by wiiich the county could 
build the new court house, the contract being 
let to a contractor providing he would take 
the county warrants. It was built at a cost 
of sixty tiiousand dollars and is one of the 
finest in tliis section of the state. In the 
fall of 1894, before his time as assistant 
supervisor expired, Mr. Reed was elected 
county sheriff and entered uixjn the duties 
of the (itfice in December, that year. That 
he filled the position in a most creditable and 
satisfactory manner is shown by his being 
elected county treasurer prior to the expira- 
tion of his term as sherifi^. taking the office 
of treasurer the day he left the other ofiice. 
\\'hen the auditing committee of the county 
checkeil up his four years as sheriff they 
found that the ct)unty was sixty dollars in 
his debt instead of their being deficiency. 
He was a member of the Sheriff's Associa- 
tion of the state. He is now supervisor of 
assessment of the county, which makes his 
position a very large and res]xinsible one, 
and he handles over one hundred and fifty 
thousantl dollars a year. His oflicial duties 
have always been discharged with a fidelity 
and promptness worthy of the highest com- 



96 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mendation.and he has proved a most popular 
and efficient officer. Mr. Reed is now, in 
1900, chairman of the RepubHcan central 
committee of Livingston county, and the 
party organization will, under his adminis- 
tration, he kept intact, and the full \'ote nf 
the part}- Ije pulled. Fraternally he is a 
member of Pontiac Lodge. Xo. 294. F. & A. 
M. ; Fairbury Chapter, R. A. M. ; the Council 
R. & S. M., of Gibson City; and St. Paul 
Commandery, No. 34, K. T., of Fairbury. 
He also belongs to a number of mutual or- 
ders, including the Modern ^^'oodmen of 
America. 



MRS. MARIA 0\\EX. 

]\Irs. Maria Owen, who now has the dis- 
tinction of having been a resident of Ponti- 
a': longer than any other of its citizens, came 
h.ere with her husband in 1842. She has 
■witnessed almost the entire development of 
the county, has seen its wild lands trans- 
fr.rmed into beautiful homes and farms, its 
hamlets grow into ^•illages and tln-iving 
towns anfl all of the interests and evidences 
of an advanced civilization introduced. 

^Irs. Owen was born Januar\- lO. 18 12. 
in X'ew York, fourteen miles from Lake 
Ontario, and is a daughter of Starks and 
Esther (Gilbert) Tracy. The father was 
a native of Sharon, New York, born April 
3. 1778, and an early settler of Oswego coun- 
t\. where he bought land prior to his mar- 
riage and there continued to make his home 
throughout life. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation and one of the highly respected 
men of his community. His estimable wife 
v,as a member of the Congregational church. 
I;(.th (lied in Oswego county. New York. 
Mrs. Owen"s maternal grandfather was 



Allen Gilbert, a soldier of the Revolutionarv 
w<,r, who was severely wounded in the head 
and left for dead on the battle-field, but was 
found and cared for mitil he recovered. At 
an early day he removed from Schoharie 
county. New York, to Oswego county, where 
his daughter, Mrs. Tracy, was liorn August 
-3- 1793- He, too, was a farmer and a 
prominent man in his community. 

In 1840 Mrs. Owen married Augustins 
Fellows, who, with his 1)rother, owned a large 
farm in Oswego county. New York, but in 
1842 he sold his interest in the same and 
purchased property in Pontiac, Illinois, 
whither the famil)- remo\-e(l in the fall of 
that year. The trip was made liv wav of 
the great lakes and W'elland canal in a small 
propeller to Chicago, and the}- l)rought with 
them all their household effects, which were 
conveyed from that city to Ottawa, Illinois, 
by teamsters who were returning to the 
latter place, where Mr. Fellows had a sister 
living. There teams were hired to convev 
the family and their effects to their new home 
in Pontiac. A farm of two hundred acres 
and a number of town lots belonged to the 
estate they had traded for before coming 
west, so that they practically owned all of the 
jiresent city at that time. There were onl}' 
three families living there, and the build- 
ings of the town consisted of a small frame 
house and the court house. Lpon the farm, 
v.liich adioined the A-illage on the east was 
a good two-room log house, with large fire 
places in both rooms, making it ])erfectly 
comfortable. 

Selling his town lots, Air. Fellciws turned 
his attention to the improvement and culti- 
\ ation of his farm and met \N-ith success in 
its operation. ( )n the lot now occupietl b}- 
Squire \\'oodrow's residence he Iniilt the 
lirst large hotel in Pontiac in 1847, '*''"i '^^'^'^ 




ELIJAH B. OWEN. 




MRS. MARIA OWEN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a laro^e liarii. In 1848 they rented tlie hotel 
iiiid that summer returned east t)n a visit. 
but in 1849 took chargfe i)f the property. 
While thus employed Mr. Fellows died of 
cholera in the summer of 1849. ^"d ^^^'^ '^* 
their children, aged seven and two years, 
respectively, died of the same dread disease. 
Having lost their three other children prior 
to this time. Mrs. Fellows was thus left 
alone. For over a year she carried on the 
hotel and farm, hut found it a very difficult 
task. 

In the fall of 1850 she married Xelson 
Buck, a surveyor and nurseryman of Bloom- 
ington, where he was engaged in business 
for some years. For several years they 
conducted the hotel and also the farm, and 
their place became the leading hostelry in 
this section. In those early days before the 
railroad was built drovers often stopped at 
their house in large numl)ers. One man 
v.onld come in an hour in advance of the rest, 
.saying that twelve or fourteen men would 
be there for supper. They also had a large 
barn for the teams of the manv movers pass- 
ing through this part of the state at that 
tmie. In the spring of 1854. when the Chi- 
cago S: Alton Railroad was built, they 
boarded the construction hands and did an 
extensive business. Mrs. Owen has. enter- 
tained .\braham Lincoln, Judge David 
Davis and other illustrious men. Her hus- 
band received api^ointment to conduct the 
j;overnment survey between Kansas and Xe- 
1 raska. and while thus engaged he and his 
l>arty were killed by the Indians in July, 
T86g. Thus she \vas again left alone with a 
h'Tge pri)pertv to care for. including the 
farm, hotel and city lots. Mr. Buck had 
three children by his first marriage, namely : 
W'illard. a soldier of the Civil war, who is 
now living in Wisconsin : Clarissa, deceased ; 



and Cordelia, widow of William Watson 
and a resident of Pontiac. 

.\t intervals Mrs. Owen continued to 
conduct her hotel for many years, it being 
rented in the meantime. She made her 
l-.ome on Water street until 1899. when her 
present elegant home on North Main street 
was built. It is supplied with all modern 
conveniences and accessories, including elec- 
tric light, hot water, etc.. and here, sur- 
rounded bv every comfort, she is spending 
her declining days, loved and respected by 
all who know her. Her youngest sister, 
Marv (].. was also one of the pioneers of the 
county, locatin? here about the same time as 
Mrs. Owen, and her home was two miles 
li]) the river. Her first husband was Mr. 
Burgett, her second Mr. Fricks and her third 
Mr. Winslow. .\fter her last marriage she 
lived f>n a farm two miles from Pontiac. but 
spent her last days in the city, dying at the 
home of Mrs. Owen February 16. 1900. 

For her third husband our subject mar- 
ried Elijah Owen, who came from near El- 
n-.j-a. Chemung county. New York, and dur- 
ing his active business career engaged in 
farming but later lived retired in Pontiac. 
Mr. Buck laid off two additions from her 
original farm and Mr. Owen laid off the re- 
n'.ainder. the additions being known as 
Buck's first and second additions and Owen's 
addition. Her name appears on many of 
the deeds of this place. She was one of 
the original stockholders of both of the na- 
tional banks of Pontiac and has displayed 
remarkable business and e.xecutive aliility in 
tl.e management of her business affairs. 
She united with the Presbyterian church in 
Pont'ac on its organization, and has since 
been one of its active and prominent mem- 
bers. When she first located here the only 
religious services were prayer meetings held 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in the cmirt liouse on Sundays, l.nit as soon 
as the raih'oad was Iniilt churclies were 
erected, and to their erection and support 
she lias alwa^'s contrilxited liberally. She 
is a most estimable ladv of many sterling 
qualities, and has a large circle of friends in 
the city which has so long: been her home. 



LOUIS A. XAFFZIGER. 

Louis A. Xaffziger. the popular cashier 
of the Bank of Dwight, has won the enyiable 
reputation as a most capable financier and 
occupies a position of no little prominence 
in connection with the public affairs of the 
town. His life demonstrates what may be 
accomplished through energy, careful man- 
agement, keen foresight, and the utilization 
of the powers with which nature has en- 
dowed one. and the opportunities with which 
the times surround him. 

^Ir. NaiTziger is proud to claim Illinois 
as his natiye state, his birth occurring in 
McLean county, !March 31, i860. His fa- 
ther, Peter NafTziger, was born in Darm- 
stadt, Germany, March 4, 1831, and there 
he remained until reaching his majority, 
when he came to America and located first 
iiL McLean county on a farm, later went to 
Butler county, Ohio, where he worked on a 
farm, the next year remo\'ing to Chicago, 
where he worked at his trade of baker for a 
time. \\ hen his parents came to America 
lie remo\ed with them to Putnam county, 
later remo\'ing to McLean county. At the 
age of twenty-eight he was married in ^Ic- 
Lean county, Ilinois, to Miss Catherine 
Stuckey, who was born in Hamilton county, 
Ohio, August 30, 1840. Her father, Peter 



Stuckey, was born in Switzerland in August, 
1799, and died February 23, i860. In 1821. 
he married Elizabeth Sommers, who was 
born oyember 24, 1801, in Alsace-Loraine, 
and in 1830 they emigrated to the United 
States and located in Butler county, Ohio, 
where they resided twenty years. In Octo- 
ber, 1850, they remoyed to McLean county, 
Illinois, and took up their residence in Dan- 
vers township. Mrs. Stuckey died in 1885 
in Pike to^ynship, Liyingston county. 

After his marriage Peter Xafifziger en- 
gaged in farming in McLean county until 
1869, when he came to Waldo township, 
Liyingston county, and purchased a tract 
of raw land, which he commenced imme- 
diately to improye and cultivate, conyerting 
it into a fine farm, on which he lived for 
many years. In 1876 he mo-\-ed to Wash- 
ington, Illinois, where he was engaged in 
mercantile business for a few years, and 
later followed the same pursuit in Stanford, 
Illinois, until 1896, when he went to Slaugh- 
ter, East Felician Parish, Louisiana, where 
he is now engaged in cotton planting. Of his 
four children, Louis A., our subject, is the 
oldest ; Emilc died at the age of nine years, 
the result of an accident: Bertha is the wife 
of George L. Riggs,a farmer and stock raiser 
of Botna, Iowa, and one son died in infancy. 

Christian Xaffziger, the paternal grand- 
father of our subject, was born in Darm- 
stadt, Germany, January 17, 1803, and came 
to this cinuitry, locating in Putnam county, 
later moving to McLean county, Illinois, 
dying there March 8, 1893. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Barbara Staley, 
was born January 22, 1805, and died Feb- 
ruary 19, 1898. 

Louis A. Xaffziger, our subject, re- 
received his primary education in the public 
schools of McLean county, and later at- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



103 



tended tlie high school of \\'ashington, Illi- 
nois, at the same time clerking in a cloth- 
ing store mornings and evenings, and stead- 
ily through the summer months. Leaving 
school at the age of sixteen, he continueil 
to clerk in the clothing store of John Burkey 
lor one year, and then entered the dry goods 
establishment of E. E. Hornish as clerk and 
bookkeeper, remaining with him in that ca- 
pacity for three years. In the spring of 
1880 A. G. Danforth, of the banking firm 
of A. G. Danforth & Company, of Wash- 
ington, Illinois, made Mr. Xaffziger a prop- 
osition to enter the bank as bookkeeper and 
assistant cashier, which he accepted, remain- 
ing with him three years. At the end of 
that time, March 15, 1883. he accepted a po- 
sition with David McW illiams of the Bank 
of Dwight as l>5okkeeper and assistant cash- 
ier, and in the fall of that year, when the 
atshier, J. \\'. \\'atkins, resigned, he was 
appointed to that position, which he has 
^ince so efficiently filled. In September, 
1 89 1, he built his present pleasant home on 
the corner of Seminole and Clinton streets, 
and besides this property he owns a well 
improved farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 2, Broughton township. Liv- 
ingston county, and also some western lands. 
On the 1st of June, i88j, Mr. Xalifziger 
\\as united in marriage with Miss M. Car- 
rie Hukill, of Washington, Tazewell county, 
Illinois, who was born in McLean county, 
a daughter of Jackson and Maria (Kern J 
Hukill. Her father was born in Fayette 
county, Ohio, October 12, 1823. and for a 
number of years was a traveling salesman, 
representing a school furniture company of 
Wabash, Indiana. In early days he also en- 
gaged in mercantile business in Lincoln, 
Illinois. He died July 2~. 1893, '^""^ '^'* 



v, ife. who was born in Mount Pleasant, 
Pennsylvania, December 28. 1829. is still 
living and continues to make her home in 
Washington, Illinois. Their children were 
James H., M. Carrie, Ida Belle and Grace. 
The last named is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
XatYziger have two children : Clara, born 
June II, 1883, and Oliver Hukill, born Oc- 
tober 29, 1887. The former is attending 
the high school, the latter tlie grammar 
schools of Dwight. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Xaflfziger are active 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which he has been an official member for 
ten years, serving as sui^erintendent of the 
Sunday school two years; one of the lx)ard 
of stewards at the present time, and chair- 
man of the finance committee of the church. 
As a Republican, he has taken an active 
and prominent part in local politics since 
attaining his maority, and was secretary of 
the Republican club of Dwight during tiie 
McKinley campaign of 1896. His first of- 
fice was that of village clerk, and he was 
afterward appointed village treasurer, uliich 
pxjsition he filled two years. During the 
boom of the town a sewerage sxslem, cost- 
ing over twenty-eight thousand dollars, was 
lilt in, and Mr. Xaftziger was appointed col- 
lector of special assessment by ci.e president 
of the village board. He was electe/l trus- 
tee of the village aiid scrvcf". m tliat capacity 
two years; was appointed township treasurer 
and held that office si.x years. In all the re- 
lations of life he has been found true to 
every trust reposed in him, whether public or 
private, and is numbered among ihe valued 
and useful citizens of Dwight, for he is pre- 
eminently public spirited and pii;gressive, 
and takes an active interest in the enterprises 
tending to public develiij)ment. 



I04 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



AUGUSTUS \\". CO\\'AN. 

Augustus ^^'. Cowan, who is now suc- 
cessfully engaged in the abstract business 
in Pontiac, with office at No. io8 West 
A\'ashington street, was born near Water- 
town, New York, October 14, 1837, a son 
of William and Emeline (Coffeen) Cowan, 
also natives of the Empire state. For S9me 
years the father was engaged in business 
as a tinsmith and hardware merchant, in 
Watertown, but died in Naples, New York, 
in 1 85 1, at about the age of forty-eight 
years, our subjects maternal grandparents 
were Henry Dale and Delight (Whitney) 
Coffeen. Througliout life the former en- 
gaged in farming near Watertown, in 
Jefiferson county. New York, and was a 
term as sheriff of that county. The 
paternal grandparents of our subject 
were Andrew and Eujjhemia (Kelly) 
Cowan, natives of Scotland, who came 'to 
the United States in 1797, and settled in 
Schenectady, New York, where they made 
their home throughout the remainder oi their 
lives. On leaving their nati\'e land the fol- 
lowing testimonials \\ere given them : 

"Wegtown, 25th March, 1797. 
"That Andrew Cowan and his wife Eu- 
]>hemia Kelly are members of the Associate 
Congregation here and now remove from 
this country to North America with un- 
blemished characters is attested by 

Theo. Ogil\'ie. Minister. 

"We. the magistrates of the borough of 
Wegtown. North Britain, hereby certify and 
declare that the bearer Mr. Andrew Cowan 
has resided in this borough since his infancy 
and lias always maintained an unexception- 
able character for honesty and sobriety, and 
being about to depart fur Xdrtli .\merica 
with his wife and children, also of good 



character, ought to meet with no molestation 
or hindrance, lie continuing to beha\'e as 
becometh. 

"Given under our hand and the common 
seal of the borough this 25th day of March, 
1797 year. 

John Nathom, 
(Seal) James Hem mag. 

Appended by 

\\'m. \\'. Connels, 

Town Clerk. 

The suliject of this sketch remained in 
^^'atertown until eighteen years of age, and 
was educated at the Jefferson County Insti- 
tute. He came west in 1854 and the follow- 
ing year took up his residence in Pontiac, 
where he clerked in a general store for some 
years. He then formed a partnership with 
Judge Jonathan Duff in the banking and 
real-estate business, conducting it with such 
success that in a few years the firm had 
gathered together a considerable fortune, ir.- 
\'ested mainly in lands in this section. In 
1870 tlie partnership was dissoh'ed. Al- 
though the business relations were discontin- 
ued there still remained such warm personal 
feeling as exists between brothers and the 
closest friends, until the Judge's death in 

1 88 1. Bound together by ties not only of 
personal friendship but that of political affin- 
ity and the brotherhood of secret societies, 
the two memjjers of the firm were regarded 
as almost members of one family, and it 
was natural that the lix'ing memlier of the 
firm should be deeply affected at the depart- 
ure of one he loved so well. Mr. Cow-an 
continued in the real-estate business until 

1882, when he was elected county treasurer 
and for four years held that office, discharg- 
ing its duties in a commendable and satis- 
factory manner. Since 1889 he has been 
owner of the Livingston county title ab- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



105 



stracts and has devoted his time and atten- 
tion to that husiness. meetiiiij with good 
success. 

At Rome. Xew York, .\ugust 21. 1867, 
was celeltrated tlie marriage of Mr. Cowan 
and Miss Mary H. P. Christian, a daughter 
of Lutlier and Margaret (George) Cliristian, 
natives of tliat state. Tiie uKither died in 
Rome, in 1868, after whicli the fatlier lived 
v,ith our subject for some time, but died at 
tlie home of his son in Port Erie, Canada, 
in 1 87 1. Tlirougliout liis active business 
life he engaged in blacksmithing. !Mr. and 
^Irs. Cowan have one child, Emeline, who 
was born in Pontiac, in 1872. and is at home. 
The family all attend the Episcopal church, 
and Mr. Cowan is connected with Pontiac 
Lodge, No. 294, F. & A. M.. and the higher 
urders of Masonry, belonging to the Com- 
niandery at Bloomington. L"ntil 1896 he 
always affiliated with the Democratic party, 
and besides serving as county treasurer he 
has been called upon to fill several minor 
offices in his township and city. He has 
always taken a deep interest in public affairs, 
as every true American citizen sliould, and 
gives a hearty support to those enterprises 
which he lielieves will prove of public benefit. 



JOB FARLEY. 

Job Farley, deceased, was for many 
years one of the leading agriculturists of 
Eppards Point township, a man honored 
and respected wherever known. He was 
born in \\'iltshire, England, September 16, 
1829, and a son of Xias and Mary (Sell- 
wood) Farley, both natives of the southern 
l>art of England. They lived as farming 



l-eople in tiiat country tlirougliout their en- 
tire lives, botli dying at about the age of 
sixty-five years. 

Our cul)ject was reared and educated at 
the place of his birth, and before coming to 
America he was a member of the London 
police force two years, and the force at 
Shaftsbury one year. It was in 1859 that he 
crossed the board Atlantic and came at once 
to Illinois, settling first near Oneida, Knox 
county, where he commenced farming, an 
occupation he continued to follow until life's 
labors were ended. After seven years spent 
in Kno.K county, he removed to Henry couii- 
t}', where fifteen years were passed, and in 
1883 came to Livingston county, locating on 
section 28, Eppards Point township. In 
1875 he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres on this section, and in 1882 eighty 
acres more, to which he added from time to 
time until at his death he was the owner of 
five eighty-acre tracts, with the exception 
of one acre used for school purposes, all un- 
der a high state of cultivation and a com- 
fortable house on each farm. These were 
purchased and improved with the view of 
providing homes for his children. 

On the 14th of April, 1863, in Knox- 
ville, Knox county, Illinois, Mr. Farley mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth ^\'alker, a daughter of 
James and Mary (Smith) Walker, also na- 
tives of Leeds, Yorkshire, England, where 
lier father, a machinist by trade, died at the 
age of thirty-six years when Mrs. Farley was 
only eleven years old. Her mother had 
died eight years previous. She came to the 
L'nited States in 1855, when nineteen years 
old, and lived with her uncle and aunt, John 
and Mary Else, in Truro township, Knox 
county, Illinois, until her marriage. Mr. 
Else, who was a farmer by occupation, died 
in Peoria in 1882, after which his wife made 



io6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lier Imme with ]\Ir. and ]\Ii"s. Farley, where 
slie (ht'd Februar}- ii, 1900. 

Oi the se\'en children liorn to our snb- 
ject and his wife live are still living, namely : 
( I ) Ilia, born in Knok county, March 27, 
1864, is the wife of Edward Folsom, a far- 
mer of Eppards Point, and they have one 
child, Edith. (2) Onias W., born in Knox 
count}-, July 3, 1865, married Lizzie 
A.rendts, and until recently was engaged in 
farming, but is now living in Pontiac. 
(3) Mary, born in Knox county, August 12, 
1867, is the wife of Charles Mofifett, a far- 
mer of Eppards Point township, and they 
have three children, Lela Heath, Merton J- 
and Harold. (4) Anna S., born in Henry 
county, May 28, 1869, is the wife of Sher- 
man Myer, also a farmer of Eppards Point 
township, and to them were born five chil- 
dren, three of whom are now living, Maud 
M., Glenn and Lee C. (5) John J., burn in 
Henry county, ]\Iay :i, 1872, died January 
26, 1874. (6) Arthur J., born January 7, 
1S74, married Anna Earhardt, and follows 
farming in Eppards Point. (7} The young- 
est child died in infancy minamed. 

Mr. Farley died at his home in Eppards 
Point township, January 9, 1895, after an 
illness of about six months, though he had 
been a sufferer from dropsy for twenty 
years and was often in great pain. The fu- 
neral was held at his home and the services 
were conducted by Rev. Hussey, assisted 
by Rev. Hobbs. The remains were interred 
in Payne's cemetery. In his religious belief 
Mr. Farley was an Episcopalian, and in po- 
litical sentiment was a Democrat. Though 
he never sought office, he was called upon to 
serve as township commissioner in Henry 
county for nine years and also as school di- 
rector. He was a hard working and indus- 
trious man, strictly upright and honorable 



in all his dealings and one who made many 
friends and no enemies. He was a dtvoted 
husband and father and took great delight 
in his home and children. He accumulated 
considerable wealtli and was able to leave 
his family in comfortable circumstances. 
Since her husband's death I\Irs. Farle}' has 
moved to Pontiac and purchased a pleasant 
home at Xo. 506 South Vermilion street, 
where she now resides. She is a most esti- 
mable lady, highly respected by all who 
know her. 



ANDREW J. HOOBLER. 

Andrew J. Hoobler, who is now living 
a retired life in Streator, Illinois, was 
for many years actively identified with the 
business interests of Livingston county, and 
was one of its honored and representative 
citizens. He is a native of Indiana, born 
in \'ermillion county, in October, iSj7, and 
there grew to manhood. His father, John 
Hoobler, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1801, 
of old Pennsylvania Dutch stock, and was 
one of the pioneer farmers of Vermillion 
county, Indiana. In 1853 ^''^ came to Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois, and entered about 
fourteen hundred acres of land in Newton 
township, becoming one of the large land 
owners of the county in his day. Here he 
continue<.l to make his home throughout the 
remaintler of his life, dying in 1885. He 
was elected a representative to the legisla- 
ture on the Whig ticket and filled that posi- 
tion one term. He was one of the pioneer 
United Brethren circuit riders and rode the 
state over at one time. He established the 
church of that denomination in his township, 
and spent most of his means in founding 
churches throughout Illinois, being prac- 
ticallv the father of them all. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



107 



Upon tlie lionie farm Andrew J- Hoobler 
grew to nianli<ii)(l. receiving the usual edu- 
cational advantages of the tlay. He married 
Miss Sarah Leonard, a daughter of Dexter 
and Elizabeth Leonard, natives of Massa- 
chusetts and early settlers of this county, 
'i hree children were born of this union, 
namely: Mrs. Fanny Syphers of Cornell, 
Illinois; Wilder, of Manville, this county, 
and Erastus, the present popular circuit 
clerk, whose sketch appears on another page 
of this volume. 

Mr. Hoobler purchased a farm in Xew- 
ti 'wn township, but after operating it for a 
few years he turned his attention to mer- 
cantile business, conducting a store in what 
is now Manville (,t!ien the village of New- 
town) for some seventeen or eighteen years. 
He met with marked success in the enter- 
prise, and finally retired from business, turn- 
ing it over to his sons. Moving to Streator 
ht has since lived retired. He is well known 
throughout Livingston county, and has the 
confidence and respect of all with whom he 
has come in contact either in business or so- 
cial life. 



JOIIX M. FIX LEV. 

John M. Finley, a successful farmer 
lid honored citizen of Pontiac township, 
' wns and oiierates a well-improved and 
valuable farm of two hundred and forty 
acres on sections 3 and 4, three ami tliree- 
i|uarters miles north of the city of Pontiac. 
i le is a native of Ohio, born in Delaware 
ounty, November 25, 1831, and is a son of 
Robert Finley, who was born in Virginia in 
1801. The family is of Irish origin and 
was founded in the Old Dominion at an early 
day. Our subject's ])aternal grand fathi-r was 



Jiihn Finley. a soldier nf the Revolutionary 
war. who removed from \'irginia to Ohio 
and opened up a farm in Delaware coiuu}'. 
There Robert Finley grew to manhood and 
married Elizabeth Riley, who was born in 
Pennsylvania of German ancestry. Her 
father, Joseph Riley, was a native of Ger- 
many, and when a child came to America. 
The vessel on whic he sailed was wrecked 
and his parents were drowned. He was then 
taken to the home of strangers and readed 
by them, at the same time adopting their 
name. For a few years after his marriage 
Robert Finley engaged in farming in Ohio, 
and in 1837 came to Illinois, locating on 
the Fox river, near St. Charles, Kane conty, 
where he opened up a farm and spent his re- 
maining years, dying there in 1886, at the 
ripe old age of seventy-five years. His wife 
had passed away two years previously at the 
age of sixty-nine years. 

Our subject was about six years of age 
v.hen brought by his parents to this state, 
and in Kane county he grew to manhood. 
He attended the common schools, but is 
mostly self-educated, haing always been a 
great reader, and is to-day a well-informed 
man. On leaving home in 1854 he came to 
Livingston county, where he and his brother 
Joseph had purchased land in 1852 and 
ii^^;^, and after locating thereon they oper- 
ated it together until 1 861. 

On the 2ist of November, 1861, in this 
county, ^Ir. Finley married Miss Frances 
E. McDougall, a native of New Vork, and 
a daughter of Robert and Christiana ^Ic- 
Dougall, who came from that stale to Illi- 
nois about 1850 and settled in La Salie coun- 
ty, where her father died in 1857. Her 
mother is still living in California at the age 
of eighty-two. ^Irs. Finley was jiricipally 
reared in that count v. To our >i'')iect and 



io8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his wife were l)orn two cliildren : ^larian 
E., who was educated at the lontiac high 
school and Dixon College, and has success- 
fully engaged in teaching in this county, 
but is now at home with her parents, and 
Orilla Eloise, wife of Warren Collins, who 
operates a part of the Finley homestead. 

Mr. and i\Irs. Finley began their do- 
mestic life upon his present farm. He has 
since erected a neat and substantial resi- 
dence, good barns and other outbuildings, 
has tilled the place and set out fruit and 
ornamental trees, so that it is now one of 
the best improved farms in the localit}'. In 
connection with general farming he has en- 
gaged in raising and feeding stock of a go :J 
grade, and in all his undertakings he has 
met with excellent success, becoming quite 
well to do. He and his brother had little 
means on locating here, but being indus- 
trious, persevering and ambitious, his labors 
were soon crowned with success. As a pab- 
lic spirited citizen he takes a deep and com- 
mendable interest in public affairs and gives 
his support to those enterprises wh.ich he be- 
lieves will advance the general welfare. 
Originally, he was a staunch Republican in 
politics and cast his fir^t presidential vote 
for John C. Fremont in iS_v'', continuing 
to affiliate with that party until JS96, when 
he voted for \\\ J. Bryan and free sdver. 
He has been a delegate to riunicrous con- 
\entions, and for a quarter of a century has 
been an efficient member of the school board, 
but cares nothing for political preferment. 



APOLLOS CAMP. 

Apollos Camp, deceased, was fur o\-er 
forty years prominently identified with the 
agricultural and business interests of Li\- 



ingst(in county, and was justly numbered 
among her honored pioneers and leading 
citizens, having located here in the spring of 
185 1. He was born in Thomaston (then 
Plymouth Hollow), Connecticut, March 19. 
1806, and was a son of Ephraim Camp, a 
Revolutionary hero, who was born in 1750 
and sjjcnt his entire life in Connecticut, 
Mhere he owned and operated a mill. Our 
suljject grew to manhood in his nati\e place 
and there learned the stone mason's trade in 
early life. 

There 'Sir. Camp married Miss Nancy 
Thomas, a niece of Seth Thomas, the noted 
clockmaker, by whom our subject was em- 
ployed as superintendent of his outdoor 
work for some time, and lived upon Sir. 
Thomas' large farm for eighteen years. His 
health failing. Sh. Camp purchased a farm 
near bv and for three years devoted his at- 
tention to agricultural pursuits. 

In the spring of 1851 Mr. Camp came to 
Livingston county, Illinois, and located lanil 
in Sunbury township, but the family did 
not come tnitil one year later, when the trip 
to this state was made by water. In the fall 
of 1852 he moved to Esmen township, his 
first home in Illinois, where he took up a sec- 
tion of land, though he still continued to 
own a three-hundred-and-twenty-acre tract 
ii' Sunbury township. He built the best 
house in Esmen township at that time. His 
nearest neighbor was then three miles away, 
and if he required anything such as black- 
smithing or a supply of groceries he had to 
go to Ottawa, fordinp- all the streams antl 
taking two days to make the trip, so sparsely 
was the country settled at that time, so few 
miprovements having been made and so few 
towns estal)lished. Mr. Camp continued t<i 
reside upon his farm until 1876. when he 
remox'ed ti3 Pontiac. but went dav after day 




APOLLOS CAMP. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ti- his farm until past eighty years of age. 
He added to his landed possessions from 
time to time until he and his son-in-law, 
Mr. Humiston. together owned two thou- 
sand acres of valuable land, most of wliich 
was improved and under a high state of cul- 
tivation. Of excellent business ability and 
broad resources, he attained a j)rominent 
place among the wealthy and substantial citi- 
zens of the county. On locating here he 
had six thousand dollars in gold, and being 
a wide-awake business man of keen discrim- 
ination and sound judgment his accumula- 
tions rapidly increased. He and his son-in- 
law engaged in business together until the 
hitter's death. They were among the orig- 
inal stockholders of the National Bank of 
I'ontiac. of which he was one of tlie early 
(!irect(jrs. His career was such as to warrant 
the trust and confidence of the business 
world, for he conducted all transactions on 
the strictest principles of honor and integ- 
rity, and he was highlv respected and es- 
teemed by all who knew him. 

Mr. Camp died May 2, 1892, and his 
wife departed this life January 23, 1864. 
She was a meml>er of the Presbyterian 
church for some years. To them were liorn 
two children, but Edward Thomas died Sep- 
tember It. 1861. before he attained iiis twen- 
ty-first year. The only representative of the 
family now living is Harriet, widow of Ben- 
net Humiston, whose .sketch appears on an- 
other page of this volume. 



JOHX H. SMITH. 

This gentleman is entitled to distinction 
as one of the most progressi\e anil enter- 
prising men of Pontiac, with whose business 



interests he has been prominently identified 
for many years. Uix>n the commercial ac- 
tivity of a community dejjends its prosperity 
and the men who are now recognized as 
leading citizens are those who are at the 
head of important business enterprises. He 
is a man of broad capabilities who carries 
forward to successful completion whatexer 
he undertakes. 

Mr. Smith was born in Half Moon \'al- 
ley. Centre county. Pennsylvania, August 
12, 1839, a son of Jacob and Lydia Ann 
( Henderson ) Smith. The father was born 
in Union county, that state, of old Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch stock, and being left fatherless 
at the age of nine years was bound out to 
strangers. There were only two children 
ir; the family and his sister was taken to 
another place. In Centre county, he mar- 
ried Lydia Ann, daughter of David Hender- 
son, who lived near Tyrone. Centre county. 
Later he located near Pine Grove, Pennsyl- 
sylvania, where he engaged in farming and 
on stormy days worked at the gvmsmith's 
trade which he had learned during his youth. 
Later he lived in Huntingdon county, the 
same state, but was with our subject in Pon- 
tiac, Illinois, a short time prior to his death. 
Both he and his wife were consistent and 
faithful members of *the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 

In the county of his nativity, John H. 
Smith was reared and obtained a good prac- 
tical education in its common schools. At 
the age of eighteen he was bound as an ap- 
prentice to a cari^enter, working for his 
board and clothes and the privilege of at- 
tending scIkxiI four months during the win- 
terter. For three years and four months he 
was thus employed, during wliich time he 
thoroughly mastered the trade, including the 
making of doors, sash. etc. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



On the30tli of Decemlser. 1863. ]\Ir. Smith 
married Miss Mary J. Duff, who was born 
Decemljer 8, 1840. Her paternal great-grand- 
father come to tliis country from Scotland. 
The grandfather. John Duf¥, was born in 
Philadelphia, and at an early day removed 
to Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, v>'hei-e 
he spent the remainder of his life as a farmer. 
He married Winifred Couch, of Philadel- 
phia, a daughter of William Couch, who 
was from Great Britain. !Mrs. Smith's 
father, Charles Dufif, ^\■as born May 24, 
1816, in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
where he grew to manhood and engag'ed in 
farming for many years. There he was 
married, August 31, 1838, to Eliza Cun- 
ningham, who v.-as born October 2, 1819, a 
daughter of Robinson and ]Mary J. (Lane) 
Cunningham, of the same county. Her fa- 
ther, a farmer of Huntingdon county, was 
born in that state, but his father was a na- 
tive of England. Charles DufY continued to 
reside on the old home farm in Pennsylvania 
until 1865, when he came to Pontiac, Illi- 
nois, and purchased one hundred and si.xty 
acres of land east of the corporation, which 
he improved and which continued to be his 
home throughout life. He also owned two 
hundred and forty acres of land north of 
Pontiac, and in all had about six hundred 
acres. He was one of the prominent and 
wealthy men of his community and was 
highly respected by all who knew him. He 
died September 9, 1873. and his wife passed 
away July it, i 887. Both were earn-est 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
After learning his trade, Mr. Smith be- 
gan taking contracts and erected many build- 
ings in Huntingdon. Centre and Clearfield 
counties, Pennsyhania. He met with ex- 
cellent success, and although a young man 
lie often employed eight hands. ^^'hile 



erecting a large church in Kerwinsville, 
Clearfield cuunty. he cast his first vote for 
Abraham Lincoln, and when the war broke 
out the work was dropped as most of his 
workmen entered the service. Returning 
tc Tyrone, he aided in the construction of 
the one-mile trestle of the Tyrone and 
Clearfield Railroad at that place, remaining 
there until going to Oil City, \'enango coun- 
ty, (luring the excitement of 1864. There 
he put down many wells, one of which was 
fourteen hundred feet deep and the average 
depth of the seventeen he drilled was six 
hundred and fifty feet. For this work he 
received one dollar per foot and an eighth 
mterest in the well, which proved quite 
quite profitable, as the one dollar per foot 
paid all expenses, and he sold liis eighth in- 
terest from eight hundred to two thousand 
dollars a well. On first going into the oil 
region he was engaged by the New York 
Oil Company, of which Mr. Hamilton, of 
New York, was president, in the erection of 
derricks. ]\Ir. Hamilton noticing the rapid- 
it)' with which he worked asked him how 
much a foot he would ask to drill the wells, 
and later asked him to name a sum per' 
year as superintendent of all their wells. Not 
caring particularly to engage in that work, 
he named two thousand dollars per year, 
l)elieving the sum greater than the com- 
pany would I)e willing to pay. His terms, 
liowever, were accepted, and he remained 
with the firm one year, and then refused an 
offer of two thousand five hundred dollars 
a year to continue. Leaving the employ of 
the oil company he commenced drilling wells 
for himself, and his first well, wdiich took 
him twenty-six days to drill. lie sold for 
eighteen hundred dollars. During the time 
he spent there he made enough to purchase 
his father's farm of one hundred and sixty 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



113 



acres for eight thousand dollars, and he 
nperatcd the place one year. 

.\t the end (^f that time .Mr. Smith sold 
1 ut and came to Pontiac. Illinois, and ])nr- 
cliased a farm three-(|uarters uf a mile east 
I 'l' the city, for which he paid fifty dollars 
jier acre although it was poorly impro\ed 
land. He huilt one of the largest and best 
harns in this section at that time. He fenced 
1 1x1 tiled the land, bringing the first carload 
; tile into the county. This he bought in 
Jnliet. paying thirty-seven dollars and a half 
I'cr thousand for three inch tile. Previous 
I" this he had put in some clapboard tile 
i:d finding that it benefited the land, he re- 
lived to thoroughly tile it. Some of it is 
still in working order although in use for 
I o\er thirty years. Mr. Smith's next ])ur- 
I chase consisted of a quarter-section of land 
' owned by Charles Uuff, which adjoins the 
ty, and he also bought one hundred acres 
' Mr. Dnft" north of his first home, making 
iiiur hundreil and twenty acres adjoining 
the town. All of this he has thoroughly 
\ tiled and im))roved, and being well located, 
i' is now among the best and m:'>st \-alua1:)le 
land (if the county. -\t ])resenl he rents 
his farm ])roperty. 

l'"ur two years Mr. Smith rented and 
operated a tile factory near town erected 
by H. C. Bruner, and met with success in 
that enterprise. In 1890 he erected a fine 
brick residence on the corner of Walnut 
and Washington streets, one of the tirst and 
best brick houses in the city at that time. 
^ It is heated by steam, lighted by electricity 
and supplied with all modern conveniences, 
w bile the lawn about the house is a quarter 
of a block in extent. Mr. Smith also 
erected a store building on Madison street 
o])posite the court house and still owns that 
property. In 1893 he bought the coal shaft 



at Pontiac. which he ojjerated a vear, and 
sank a shaft within twenty-eight feet of the 
third vein of coal, afterward selling the 
same at a jirolit. being the imly nnc tn make 
any nidney in th;U \-cnture. I'nr the [)ast 
two years he has again given his attention 
to the tile business and furnishes employment 
to seventeen men in manufacturing I)oth 
brick and tile. 

Mr. Smith began life for himself with- 
out a dollar, antl in fact was si.xty-two dol- 
lars and fifty cents in debt. As already 
stated he was apprenticeil to learn the car- 
])enter's trade. I'or the first year he was 
to receive thirty dollars; the second year 
fort}--fi\e dollars: and the third year sixty 
dollars. lioard was included and in ad- 
dition he was to have four months schooling 
each year. The first year he was permitted 
to go to scIkjoI, according to contract, but 
during the succeeding years on one pretext 
or another he was kejjt at work. On the 
advice of his mother he permitted his last 
Aear's wages to remain with his employer 
until the end of the >'ear in order that he 
might ha\-e a means to purchase a set of 
car])enter's tools. His em[)loyer failed 
about the end of his third year, and he never 
recei\ed a cent. .\ local merchant kindly 
agreed to furnish him the set of tools needed 
and which amounted to sixty-two dollars and 
fifty cents, and wait his convenience in pay- 
ing. Securing the outfit he went to work 
as a journeyman carpenter, and in due time 
paid for his tools and felt like a free man. 
On conn'ng to Illinois, his father loaned him 
fi\e hundred dollars, but the wealth he has 
since acf|uired has been secured through 
his own enterprise, good business alMlity 
and sound judgment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith have three children, 
namely: Elizabeth is the wife of Cary W. 



114 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Hill, of Pontiac, and they have one son, 
?Iarold Smith; Charles is engaged in busi- 
ness with his father and now manages the 
tile works; and Winifred, twin sister of 
Charles, is the wife of Franklin Laver, who 
oi)erates the home farm and they ha\'e one 
child, Alfred A'eron. 

During the Civil war, [Mr. Smith was a 
member of the Pennsylvania militia, which 
was not supposed to leave the state, but they 
Avent to Hagerstown, [Maryland, and par- 
ticipated in the battle of Antietam. At his 
home he could hear the cannonading at Get- 
tysburg and also during the Morgan raid. 
He has ser\-ed as school director, but has 
never cared for political honors, preferring 
to devote his entire time and attention to 
his business interests. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church and are highly respected and 
esteemed bv all who know them. 



ERASTUS HOOBLER. 

Erastus Hooliler. the present well- 
known circuit clerk, is one of the most 
prominent young men of Livingston county, 
a leader in political and business circles, 
and whether in public or private life he 
is always a courteous genial gentleman, well 
deserving the high regardd in which he is 
held. 

A native of this county. [Mr. Hoobler 
was born in Xewtown township, December 
II, 1867, and is a son of Andrew J. and 
Sarah (Leonard) Hoobler, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. He 
was educated in the public schools, which 
he attended constantly until eighteen years 
of age, and then began his Ijusiness career 



as a merchant of [Mehille, he and his 
b.rother Wilder purchasing the store f^ir- 
mery owned by their father and conducting 
it under the firm name of Hoobler Brothers. 
They did a large and successful business for 
some seven or eight years, being energetic 
and progressive yoiuig men of good busi- 
ness ability and industrial habits. 

On the 9th of June, 1888, Air. Hoobler 
was united in marriage wdth Miss Jodie 
Beach, a daughter of Anson and Ph'jebe 
Beach, formerly of La Salle county, and to 
them have been born one child, Ernest E. 
The parents both hold membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Hoob- 
ler is now serving as one of the stewards 
of the church in Pontiac. Fraternally, he 
is a member of the [Modern \\"oodmen of 
America and of Beacon Lodge, No. 618, I. 
O. O. F., of Cornell. 

Since reaching man's estate [Mr. Hoob- 
ler has always been active in Republican 
politics, doing all within his power for the 
success of his party. In the spring of 1894 
he sold his store, and two years later was 
nominated as circuit clerk for Livingston 
county, to which office he was elected that 
fall by a handsome majority. He has since 
efficinetly discharged the duties of that po- 
sition, and in 1900 was renominated by ac- 
clamation. 



JAMES XICOL. 

James Xichol is the proprietor of an 
excellent farm of two hundred and forty 
acres on sections 1 1 and 3, Pike township, 
Livingston county. The well-tilled fields 
and neat and thrifty appearance of the place 
testify to careful supervision of a painstak- 
ins: owner — one who is a thorough farmer 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



15 



and successful business man. He was born 
in Arbroath, F"orfarshire, Scotland. June 6, 
1849, a son of William and Jane (Simpson) 
Xicol, also natives of that country, where 
the mother spent her entire life. After lier 
death the father married again. He was 
born in Forfarshire in 1813. a son of James 
Xicol, and in his native land was employed 
as a pattern or model maker. In 1865 he 
emigrated to the new world and came direct 
to Livingston county, Illinois, where he ha<l 
previously purchased eighty acres of land on 
section 3, Pike township, where onr subject 
now resides. At that time the tract was 
v.ild prairie land, but he at once commenced 
to fence, break and improve it. Later he 
built a good house and made many other 
permanent improvements. In connection 
with farming he also worked at the car- 
penter's and joiner's trade and built many 
of the residences in his part of the county. 
.\s one of the prominent and honored citi- 
zens of his community, he was called upon 
tL fill the offices of supervisor, justice of 
the peace, school director and clerk of the 
district some years. He was a man of sterl- 
ing worth and strict integrity and was pre- 
eminently i)ublic spirited and progressive. 

Reared in his native land, James Xicol 
received the advantages of a good common 
school education, and served a five-years' 
apprenticeship to the cabinetmaker's trade 
after which he worked as a journeyman for 
two years. In 1868 he decided to join his 
father in .\merica and sailed from (ilasgow 
to Xew York, landing in the latter city in 
September of that year. He proceeded at 
once to his father's home in this county, and 
for the first si.x nuniths of his residence here 
he worked at the carpenter's trade. The fol- 
lowing two years he engaged in farming and 
then went to Chicago, where he was em- 



I^loyed at his trade for six months, rcturniu.'; 
ti> this county at the end of that time. He 
lias since devoted his time to agricultural 
])ursuits, and now owns the old homestead, 
which he has greatly imro\ed. and to w'.iich 
he lias added one huntlred and si.xty acres, 
making a fine farm of two hundred and 
forty acres. 

In Livingston county. Xovember 24, 
18873, ^^^- ^icol was united in marriage 
with Miss Elizabeth Petrie. who was born, 
reared and educated in the same towri as 
her husband, and is a daughter of William 
Petrie, who is still living in Scotland at the 
advanced age of seventy-nine years. By 
this union have been born seven cliildren, 
namely : William P. and James, both farm- 
ers of this county: Mabel May, Alfred. Ed- 
ward Arthur. D. Harry and .\nnio Kdiili. 
all at home. 

In his political afifiliations Mr. Nicol is an 
ardent Republican and cast his first presiden- 
tial vote for Rutherford B. Ha>es. He 
has been a delegate to county conventions, 
.served as township clerk about seven years 
and was a member of the school board and 
cierk of the district twelve years. Socially, 
he is a member of the Modern Woodmen 
camp of Chenoa. and religiously is a member 
of the Presbyterian church, to which his 
wife also belongs. In all life's relations he 
has been true to every trust reposed in him, 
and is justly numbered among the valued 
and useful citizens of his communitv. 



JOHX C.rTHRIE. 

John Guthrie, who for over a third 
of a century has been identified with the 
agricultural interests of Livingston county, 
and now makes his home on section 10, Pike 



ii6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



township, was born in tlie city of Glasgow, 
Scotland, December 26, 1827, a son of 
James and Jane ( McMurtrie) Guthrie, who 
spent their entire lives in Scotland, mostly 
in Glasgow, locating- there soon after their 
marriage. There all of their children were 
born in that city and both parents died. By 
trade the father was a stonecutter. 

Our subject grew to manhood in his na- 
tive land and obtained a good education in 
an Ayrshire village school. He served a 
four years' apprenticeship to the weaver's 
trade with his uncle, David McMurtrie, and 
tlien returned to Glasgow, where he worked 
in a factory, having charge of one depart- 
ment four years. Later he was employed in 
a wholesale store for three years, and then 
emigrated to America, in 1850, takmg pass- 
sage on a sailing vessel at Greenock on the 
Clyde for Montreal, and arriving in the lat- 
ter city after a stormy voyage of eight 
weeks. \Miile in the Gulf of St. Lawrence 
the masts \\-ere broken and they were delayed 
two weeks at Sidney, Cape Breton, while 
new masts were set up. Mr. Guthrie and 
two other men worked all one night at the 
pumps in order to save the \-essel from de- 
struction. It was twehe weeks from the 
time he left home until he reached his desti- 
nation in Kendall county, Illinois, in Sep- 
tember, 1850. There he had an uncle liv- 
ing, while another uncle made the voyage 
with him. The following year he com- 
menced work in Kendall county gathering 
corn for ten dollars per mcnth, and, being- 
unused to such work, the skin Avas worn 
froni his fingers in a short time. 

In 1852 \lr. Guthrie went to ]\Iadison 
county, Iowa, where he spent one year, and 
on his return to Illinois settled in \\'ood- 
ford county, where he worked by the month 
until 1864. During that year he purcliased 



the farm in Pike township, Livingston coun- 
ty, where he now resides, but engaged in 
farming upon rented land in Tazewell 
county for two years, at the end of which 
time he located upon his own land, ha\- 
ing since February, 1861, made it his hume. 
He has planted an orchard and considerable 
small fruit, has divided his land into fields 
of convenient size by good fences, has erect- 
ed a pleasant residence and substantial out- 
buildings and now has a well-improved and 
desirable farm of eighty acres. 

In Tazewell county Mr. Guthrie was 
married, in 1864, to Miss Betsy Nicol, who 
was born and reared in Arbroath, Scotland, 
and came to the new world with her mother 
in 1853. She died, lea\'ing no children, and 
for his second wife Mr. Guthrie married 
Mrs. Eliza (McCracken) McNeil, who was 
born and reared in Ireland. By her first 
married she has three children : Martha, 
wife of Henry Crabb, of Livingston county; 
Lizzie, wife of Charles Richardson, of Pike 
township, and James, a resident of Chicago. 
Mr. Guthrie has two children by his second 
r.iarriage : David M. and Alaggic May, 
both at home. 

Since casting- his first presidential ballot 
for General U. S. Grant, in 1868. Mr. Guth- 
rie has been a stanch Republican, but has 
never cared for political honors. Both he 
and his wife are active members of the 
Presbyterian church of Chenoa, and are peo- 
ple of sterling worth and strict integrity. 



JOHN H. CRUMBAKER. 

John H. Crunibaker. a well-known and 
highly respected citizen of Avoca township. 
Livingston county, Illinois, was born in 
Muskingum county, Ohio, August 11, 1845, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



117 



and is a son of William .\. and Margaret 
(Piper) Cruinbaker, natives of \'irginia 
and Pennsylvania, respectively. As chil- 
dren they went to Ohio, and after that con- 
tinued til reside in that state for many years, 
the father being engaged in fanning. In 
1864 they came to Illinois and settled near 
Lexington, where they still reside on a farm 
of forty acres. Both are consistent mem- 
bers of the Methodist church, and in politics 
the father was formerly a Whig and is now 
a Republican. To them were burn twehe 
children, two of whom died in infancy, while 
th.ose who reached , years of maturity are 
John H., our subject; Marion \'.. a Meth- 
odist Episcopal minister of Kankakee; Sarah 
C. wife of S. S. Smith, of Nebraska; Maria 
V... wife of William Stickler, postmaster of 
Lexington: Oliver M., a resident of Cropsey 
township, McLean county; Samuel, a resi- 
dent of the state of Washington; Joanna, 
wife of J. C. Finley, of Nebraska; Jonas A., 
of Washington; Margaret, wife of H. Wil- 
son, who lives near Lexington, Illinois; and 
Alice E., wife of Ralph Wilson, of Ne- 
braska. 

The early education of Julin II. Ciuni- 
baker was obtained in the common schools 
of Ohio, and after coming to Illinois with 
the family, at the age of eighteen years, he 
totik an elective course at the Wesieyan Uiti- 
versit\- in Bloomington and also attended 
school in Onarga for a short time. Subse- 
([uently he taught school in different parts 
of ilcLean county during the winter months 
for sixteen years, while through the sum- 
mer season he engaged in farming. In 1885 
he came to Livingston county and first rent- 
ed a farm near Wing. Since then he has 
lived in Avoca townshij) and has made his 
home upon the J. L. McDowell farm of 
three hundred and ten acres since 1894. 



Two hundreil acres of this tract are under 
cultivation and he devotes the same to the 
raising of grain. 

On the J5th of [March, uSfig. Mr. Crum- 
liaker married .Miss Elizabeth Jane Wilson, 
\vh(i was born near Cincinnati, Ohio, in 
JS50, and they have become the i)arents of 
eight children, two of whom died in child- 
hood. Those living are \'ictor .\., who is 
preparing for the ministry at Du Pauw 
University of Indiana; William, who lives 
near Chalmers. Indiana, is married, and has 
two children, Bessie and an infant ;D. Theo- 
dore, who is engaged in farming near Fair- 
bmy, and resides at ho.nie:Jonas K., George 
R. and John P., who are all at home assist- 
ing their father on the farm. 

By his ballot Air. Crumbaker supports 
the men and measures of the Republican 
i;arty, has served as collector of his town- 
ship two terms, town clerk two years and 
school director three years. Religiously, he 
is an active meml)er and supporter of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and has the 
confidence and respect of all who know him 
on account of his sterling worth and strict 
iiiteyritv. 



SOLON C. DLXIIAM. 

Solon C. Dunham, a wellknown agricult- 
lUMSt of Epijards Point township, who owns 
and operates a fine farm i)f one hundreil 
and seventy-two acres on section 31, is a 
native of Illinois, his birth having occurred 
in Morgan county, October 18, 1848. His 
father, Ebenezer Dunham, was born in New 
Plampshire, in 18 10, and was a son of Will- 
iam Dunham, also a native of the old Ciranite 
state. About 1831 Ebenezer Dunham came 
west and located in Morgan county, where he 



Ii8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



married Catherine Sweet, a native of tiiis 
state and a daughter of Peleg Sweet, one of 
the earliest settlers of that county. There 
Mr. Dunham followed farming some years, 
later spent about eighteen years in Wash- 
burn, JNIarshall county, and in 1865 came to 
Livingston county and purchased the farm 
on which our subject now resides. At that 
time it was a tract of wild prairie land, and 
tc its improvement and cultixation he de- 
voted his energies throughout the remainder 
of his life. There he died in 1884, lion- 
ored and respected by all who knew him, 
and is still survived by his wife, who resides 
on the old homestead with her son. 

During his boyhood and youth Solon 
C. Dunham attended the local schools and 
assisted his father in tlie labors of the farm, 
and after reaching man's estate took charge 
of the farm and business, which he has since 
carried on with marked success. He has 
erected a large, neat and substantial resi- 
dence, built a commodious barn, and has 
made many other improvements, wdiich add 
to the beauty and value of the place. 

In this county, Mr. Dunham was married, 
in 1880, to Miss Anna Stuckey. who was 
born in England, but was rearetl in McLean 
and Li\ ingston counties, Illinois. By this 
union ha\-e been born f(_)ur children, namely: 
Ralph, Roscoe B.. Earl and Inez, all at 
home. ]\Irs. Dunham and Mrs. Dunham's 
mother are meml)ers of the Baptist church 
and tlie family is widely and favorably 
known. In his political views I\Ir. Dunham 
is a stanch Republican, and cast his first 
presidential vote for General U. S. Grant, 
in 1872, but he has never cared for the honors 
or emoluments of public oftice. He is. how- 
ever, a staunch friend of etlucation, and has 
l)een an efficient member of the school board 
for some years. 



E. W. PEARSON. 

Among the pleasantest rural homes of 
Esmen township, Livingston county, is tlic 
one belonging- to this gentleman on section 
26. and his farm is one of the model places 
of that locality, being supplied with all 
modern conxeniences and accessories needed 
liy the ]irogressi\-e agriculturist of the pres- 
ent day. 

Mr. Pearson was born in Miami countv, 
Ohio. August II. 1836. and l)elongs to a 
family which was founded in that state by 
his grandfather, Enos Pearson, a native of 
V'irginia. His ancestry can he traced back 
to two peers of England, in which country 
the family was (|uite noted, .\aron Pear- 
S(jn, father of our suliject, grew to manhood 
in Miami countv, Ohio, and there marrietl 
Rachel Moore, who was born in that state of 
Cierman ])arentage. In earl}- life the father 
followed farming and later engaged in the 
manufacture of lumber. He died in Ohio 
when our subject was about seven years old, 
his wife three years later. In their family 
were five children, four sons and one daugh- 
ter, but only E. \\'., our subject, and John, a 
resident of Marion count}'. Ohio, are now 
Ining. 

Our subject's school prix'ileges during his 
bi.ivhood were limited, and he is alnn)st 
V\ho]l}- self-educated. Being left an orphan, 
he was thrown upon bis own resources when 
a lad of seven years. He grew to manhood 
upon- a farm and remained in his native 
county until October, 1855. when he came 
to Illinois, joining his guardian in Bloom- 
ington. He came to this state by himself, 
dri\-int;' across the country with a team of 
liorses. In Xo\-ember of the same vear he 
located in Livingston county and bought 
eighty acres of land in Odell township, to 




E. W. PEARSON. 



THE BIOGR-\PHICAL RECORD. 



the improvement and cultivation of which 
lie devoted his attention until 1865, when 
he sold that place and bought one hundred 
and sixty acres of wild prairie land in Es- 
men township, where he now resides. He 
has since added to it an eighty-acre tract, 
making a fine farm of two hundred and forty 
ores, which he has ])laced under a high state 
I cultivation. He has erected a modern 
and commodious residence some distance 
from the road, and leading up to it is a nice 
driveway thrt)ugh grounds shaded by lovely 
evergreen and other shade trees. The land 
i; well tiled, there are two good orchards 
ui)on the place and a flowing well, which, 
operate<l by a windpump. supplies the water 
both for house and stock. Besides tliis valu- 
able property Mr. Pearson owns two well- 
unproved farms near Hartley. O'Brien 
county, Iowa, one of two hundred and forty. 
[ the other of eighty acres, and has two farms 
of one hundred and sixty acres each in Col- 
rado and one of three hundred and twenty 
acres in Kansas, used as cattle ranches. In 
connection with farming he has been en- 
gaged in buying and selling real estate. He 
is an energetic and progressive business man 
who carries forward to successful completion 
whatever he undertakes, anti his prosperity 
due entirely to his own well-directed and 
riiergetic efforts. He was one of the orig- 
. inators and charter members of the Pontiac 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, organized 
ii! 1892, and was elected its first president, 
which position he has filled most satisfac- 
torily since that time. 

Returning to his old home in Miami 
county, Ohio, Mr. Pearson was married 
there, October 28, 1858, to Miss Rachel 
Sheafer, who was lx)rn in Pennsylvania, but 
was reared in that county, and is a daughter 
of Eckert Sheafer. Bv this union were born 



six children, namely: Rachel, at home: 
Abraham L.. who is marrieil and engaged in 
farmin?^ and fruit raising in California: 
Arthur, who is married and follows farming 
in Esmen township. Livingston county, Illi- 
nois: Emma, wife of R. E. Knapp. of Ponti- 
ac: Anna, wife of Robert Brunskill. a farm- 
er of Esmen township: and Ida M.. who 
was graduated at the State Normal School 
and has successfuUv engaged in teaching for 
some years, beinp" first assistant principal 
of the Jefferson Park high school at El Paso 
at the present time. 

Politically Mr. Pearson was formerly 
identified with the Republican party and cast 
l.is first presidental vote for John C. Fre- 
tront in 1856. but of late years has been in- 
ciependent in politics. He is a stanch friend 
of education, was elected a member of the 
school board of Odell when nineteen years 
of age antl filled that jKisition almost con- 
tinually until moving to Esmen township, 
he has served as township treasurer since 
1870 and at intervals has been a member of 
the county board of su])ervisors for about 
fifteen years, during which time he was a 
member of various committees and chairman 
of the building committee in charge of build- 
ing the poor house after the death of Mr. 
Morrow. He has been a delegate to nu- 
merous county, congressional and state con- 
ventions of his party and to two national 
conventions, helping to nominate J. B. Weav- 
er at the first Populist convention, and at the 
St. Louis convention, in 1896. helping to 
nominate Bryan and Watson. He is always 
to be found on the Populist county commit- 
tee, having served as its chairman, and is 
popularily known as the father of the party 
in this county, and he has always taken an 
active and commendable interest in public 
affairs. He is pre-eminently jniblic-spirited 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and priigressixe. and as a citizen has always 
Ijeen found true to every trust repi.ised in 
liim. 



THOMAS JOHXSTOX 

Tlionias Johnston, the well-known super- 
intendent of the Puntiac Diamond Co-opera- 
tive Coal Company of Pontiac Illinois, is a 
native of England, born in Staffordshire, 
April JO, 1884, and is a son of Thomas and 
Mary Ann (Brown) Johnston. The father 
was born in Ireland, but wdien quite young 
\\ent to England, where he continued tcT 
make his b(jme throughout life, d}'ing 
]\Iarcb 12, 1878, at the age of sixty-seven 
years. Tlie mother died on the 21st of the 
same month He was always a hard work- 
ing man and for many years was foreman of 
an iron works in Staffordshire. 

Oor subject is the sixth in order of birth 
in a family of eleven children, nine of wdiom 
are still living, but he is the only one in this 
country. -He obtained his education in the 
common schools of Staffordshire and 
learned the trade of an engineer in the em- 
ploy of the Apedale Coal & Iron Company 
of that place, remaining with them five years. 
In the fall of 1880 he came to the United 
States, and first located in Streator, Illinois, 
where he engaged in coal mining, and after- 
ward became engineer for the Chicago, 
Vermilion & Wilmington Coal Company at 
that place, but only remained with tliem a 
year or two. He was next employed as en- 
gineer with the Star Coal Company of 
Streator for three or four years, and for 
eleven years was with the Richard Evans 
Coal Company of the same place. In De- 
cember, 1895, he came to Pontiac to take 
charge of a shaft at this place as engineer, 



and was thus employed until 1897, wdien the 
shaft was leased by the present co-operative 
company, of which Mr. Johnston is manager, 
being associated with five others : Thomas 
Velvin, president : Charles F. Acklin, treas- 
in"er ; Walter H(_)gan, mine manager, and 
^lathew Dickman and William Schress, di- 
rectors, all of whom reside in Pontiac. The 
shaft was leased for a period of fifteen years 
from October, 1899, and the entire man- 
agement is with the six men mentioned. Ac- 
cording to the present law only six men can 
work in one shaft, but the company has now 
sunk another escape shaft and can put more 
men to work so that they will be able to take 
nut from two hundred and fifty to three 
liundred tons of coal per day. 

Before leaving England ^^Ir. Johnston 
was married, July 8, 1878, to Aliss ]Mary 
Ann Pickerill, of Staffordshire, a daughter 
of Robert and Sarah (Eccles) Pickerill The 
father was a shoe manufacturer and fol- 
lowed that occupation throughout his active 
business life, but is now living a retired life 
in Staffordshire, at the age of seventy-seven 
years. The mother died in 1893, at the age 
of sixty-six. Only two of their family came 
to America: !Mrs. lohnston and Anna, wife 
of Benjamin Copeland,a conl miner of Strea- 
or, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston have a 
family of four children, namely : Thomas 
Bowyer, born in Staffordshire, England, De- 
cember 29, 1878, was educated in Streator, 
and is now living in \\'enona, Illinois, where 
he is a hoisting engineer for the \\'enona 
Coal Company. Sarah Ann, born in Staf- 
fordshire, June 9, 1880, is at home; Fan- 
nie, born in Livingston county, Illinois, 
June 19, 1883, graduated from the public 
schools of Pontiac in 1900. and Pearl, born 
in Fulton county, Illinois. January 3, 1890, 
is attending school. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



123 



By liis 1)all(it ^[r. Ji'linstmi lias always 
supported the men ami measures oi the Dem- 
ocratic party, but has never sought nor de- 
sired pul)lic office, though often urged by 
his friends to become a candidate. He is a 
prominent member and financial secretary 
of the Episcopal church of Pontiac. which his 
family also attend. He is also a memlier of 
Court Pride. Foresters of America, of Pon- 
tiac. of which he has served as trustee one 
term ; is a member of the Court of Honor. 
No. 18^, of Pontiac. and the National 
Brotherhood Association of Coal Hoisting 
Engineers. As a 1)usiness man he is thor- 
oughly reliable and the success that he has 
achieved in life is justly merited, for it is 
tlue entirely to his own industry, enterprise 
and good management. He has a good 
home. 411 East Prairie street, which he 
bought in 1898. 



WILLIAM WOODING. 

William Wooding, a retired farmer 
• ■\ Pontiac, who came to this country in 
the spring of 1869, is a typical self-made 
num, and in the following record of his ca- 
reer there is much to arouse respect and es- 
teem. He has placed his reliance upon in- 
dustry and perseverance, and by making the 
most of circumstances, however discourag- 
ing, has made his way to substantial suc- 
cess, his fine farm in Pike township being a 
tangilile evidence of prosperity. 

Mr. Wooding is a native of England, 
born in Yarley Hastings, Northamptonshire, 
November 17, 1831. and is a son of Jesse 
and Ann (Rainbow) Wooding, who were 
married September 13, 18 j8. The father 
was born m the same place in 1805. and 



there maile bis home until coining l() this 
country two years after our subject crossed 
the Atlantic, but died the ninth day after 
landing at the home of our subject in New 
Jersey. The mother came to America with 
her husband and died here in 1871. 

William Wooding acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools of his nati\e land. 
As a young man of nineteen years he emi- 
grated to the United States and located first 
in Salem county. New^ Jersey, where he 
v,i irked on a farm and also in a tile factory, 
which was probably the first started in the 
L'nited States, the proprietor ha\ing sent 
to England for the machinery. Our sub- 
ject and his brother worked for him five 
years and then came to Illinois, in 856, 
with the intention of starting a factory of 
their own. but finding land so cheap they re- 
solved to engage in agricultural jjursuits. 
After looking over the field Mr. Wooding 
located near Farmington, Fultiin county, 
where he engaged in farming for nine years. 

In the spring of 1869 he came to Li\ing- 
ston county and in partnership with his 
brother purchased a farm of two hundred 
and sixty acres in Pike township, which they 
improved and operated together for 1 time, 
but finally divided the property. Our subje ct 
still owns an excellent farm of one hundred 
and eighty-one acres in that and Eppards 
Point township, which he has thoroughly 
tiled and transformed into one of the most 
highly cultivated and productive tracts in 
the locality. It is hedged and cross hedged 
and improved with good and substantial 
buildings, which stand as a momiment to his 
thrift and enterprise. In connection with 
general farming he engaged in stock raising 
quite extensively, and usually had a carload 
of hogs for shipment each fall. I'esides his 
farm in this count v, he owns land in Indiana, 



124 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



\\hicli lie is now improving; lie built a good 
home at No. 303 West Moulton street, at 
the corner of Plum street, Pontiac, where he 
has resided since the spring of 1896, having 
retired from active labor to enjoy a well 
earned rest. 

Mr. Wooding has been twice married, 
his lirst AN'ife being Amanda Humphry, a 
native of Washington county, Indiana. He 
tootook her to Kearney, Nebraska, in 1885, 
with the hope of benefiting herhealth, but 
she died there the same fall, leaving three 
children, namely: Mary, now the wife of 
Perry Morton, of Pontiac, ]\v whom she has 
two children, Mabel and Leonora; Lucy, 
wife of Wesley Porter, of Owego township, 
I)y whom she has two sons, Harry and 
Charles; antl \\'illiam, who married Leona 
Perry, and has two children, Orville and 
Hazel Lorena. He lives on the home farm 
in Pike township. 

Returning to England in 1887, Mr. 
Wooding there married Miss Mary Berrill, 
of Yardley Hastings, a daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Morris) Berrill, and by this 
union has been born a daughter, V- mifred. 
For twenty-five years Mrs. Wooding's sis- 
ter, Sarah Berrill, has held the position of 
maid with Lady Southampton, who is a lady 
in waiting on Queen \'ictoria, and as such 
makes all the trips with the Queen's escort. 
Pier father, John Berrill, was a native of 
Northampton, where his ancestors have re- 
sided for at least three or four generations, 
and on the maternal side Mrs. Wootling is 
of an old and respected family that for many 
generations have been born on the Martpiis 
of Northampton's estate. Her grandfather 
Morris was a shepherd by occupation. The 
records of the family are to be found in the 
parish church. In tracing his ancestry back 
five or si.\. generations, Mr. Wooding finds 



that he springs from the same family as his 
wife. His mother, Elizabeth Rainljow, was 
a daughter of James and Elizabeth Ratley, 
and the latter was a daughter of John and 
Ann Berrill, who were the great-grandpar- 
ents of Mrs. Wooding. Her grandfather 
was Richard, who in turn was a son of John 
and Ann Berrill, previously mentioned. All 
were residents of Yardley Hastings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wooding have traveled 
quite extensively, and visited their native 
land again in 1890. He has ever taken an 
active interest in educational affairs and 
most efficiently served as school director of 
his township while residing in the country. 
He is a consistent and faithful member of 
the Baptist church, and one of the highly re- 
spected and honored citizens of the com- 
munitv. 



JAMES MURPHY. 

James Murph}', the well-known engineer 
of the water works in Pontiac, Illinois, was 
born in Campbellford, Northumberland 
county, Ontario, Canada, August 7. 1854, 
and is a son of Peter and Ann (Spence) 
Murphv. The father was born in Xewray, 
County Down, Ireland, about 1822. and 
there gained a thorough knowledge of the 
shoemaker's trade. When a young man 
he emigrated to Canada, where he married 
Ann Spence, a native of Nottingham. Eng- 
land, who had moved to Canada with an 
aunt after the death of her prents. In 1864 
they came to Pontiac and were among the 
early property owners of the city, building 
their own house on west W ater street. 
Tluoughout the greater part of his life the 
father engaged in mining. He died in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



125 



April, 1895. the mother April 16. 1899. 
Both were devout members of St. Mary's 
Catholic church, and were hjohly respected 
hv all who knew them. 

Tills wortiiy oiui)le left a family of eight 
children, of whom our subject is the second 
in order of birth. He began his education 
in Canada and after the remo\al of the fam- 
ily to Pontiac attentled the public schools 
here for a time. After the completion of 
his education he was variously employed 
for a time, but for the past twenty-five years 
he has l>een principally engaged in running 
stationary engines, operating some of the 
first ever brought to Pontiac. In 1884 he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
wild land in York county. Nebraska, wliicli 
he converted into a well improved farm, 
and there he successfully engaged in mixed 
farming for some time, during which period 
the country was well settled up and became 
a thriving agricultural district. He was one 
of the school directors in his township for 
four years, during which time a school house 
was built in his district. Renting his farm 
he returned to Pontiac in 1896 and was 
appointed engineer of the water works, 
which position he has since filled in a most 
efficient and satisfactory manner, having 
charge of two Gordon pumps with a capac- 
ity of one million and five hundred thousand 
gallons daily, which are fully taxed most of 
the time. These are kept running day and 
night, his son serving as night engineer. 
Fraternally he is a mem1)er of the Modern 
\\oodmen of America. 

On the 14th of September. 1881, Mr. 
Murphy was united in marriage with Miss 
Bridget Sullivan, and to them have been 
born four children, namely : James, who 
is an engineer with his father: Katie. Joseph 
and Mary. Michael Sullivan, Mrs. Mur- 



phy's father, was born in Limerick. Ire- 
land, and as ayoung man came to America. 
After some time spent in New York state 
he came to Chicago, and entered the employ 
of the Chicago & Alton Railroad, aiding in 
its construction from Dwight to Blooming- 
ton. P)eing pleased with tliis locality he 
located in Pontiac when it was a very small 
\illage;. being among its early residents, 
building a home on North ^'ermillion street. 
At Lake Station he had previously married 
Catlierinc .\nnan. of Chicago. \vho was 
born in W'aterford. county Cork. Ireland, 
and jirior to her marriage worked in New 
York and latter in Chicago. They were 
memljcrs of the Catholic church, and before 
a church was established in Pontiac mass 
was said at the homes of the different mem- 
bers. In 1880 they. too. removed to York 
county. Nebraska, and purchased a tract of 
one hundred and sixty acres adjoining our 
subject's farm, and upon that place Mr. Sulli- 
van died June 2. 1885. his wife, February 
2\. 1896. In their family were only two 
children, William, a resident of Nebraska ; 
and Bridget, wife of our subject. 



LARS EXGELSEN. 

Lars Engelsen, a well-known agricult- 
urist residing on section 10, Esman town- 
ship. Livingston county, was born in Nor- 
way, July 12, 1845, and is the only child of 
Engel and Ella (Mickleson) Engelsen. also 
natives of that countr}-. where the father 
followed farming until his death in 1852. 
Five years later the wife afid son came to 
America on a sailing vessel, and were about 
three weks in crossing the Atlantic from Ber- 
gen to Quebec. They proceeded at once to 



126 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Morris. Grundy county, Illinois, and in the 
fall of the same year moved to La Salle 
ci^untv. where Mrs. Engelsen was married, 
in 1859. to Torris Johnson, also a Xnrwe- 
. gian by birth and a cooper by trade, follow- 
ing that ocupation in Dayton. Illinois, f in- 
many years. Later they moved to Indian 
Creek, the same county, where Mrs. John- 
son died. 

Lars Engelsen lived with his mother and 
step-father until grown, and received a fair 
education in the schools of La Salle county. 
He l-jegan life for himself as a farm hand 
and was thus employed for several years 
before and after his marriage. He subse- 
quently rented land. In 1868 he came to 
Livingston county and located upon his 
present farm in 1880, it being a part of the 
large tract of land owned by Apollos Camp 
of Pontiac, for whom our subject w(.irked 
about seven years and wdio virtually ga\-e 
him the place. Mr. Engelsen has erected 
thereon a large and substantial residence, 
a good barn and other outbuildings, and 
has made many other impro\-ements upim 
the farm. In connection with its (opera- 
tions he also cultivates about one Inuulred 
acres more, and has been quite successful 
in his farm business. 

On the 14th of February, 1865, Air. 
Engelsen was married in La Salle county, 
to Miss Anna Dora Engelsen, who was 
born and reared in Norway, and when a 
young lady came to America, where she 
attended the English schools for a short 
time. By this union were born six chil- 
dren who are still living, namely : Engle 
B., a resident of Iowa; Elmer T., of Xorth 
Dakota; Joseph E., who is in this county; 
Milton L., Bertha E. and Ellen M.. all at 
home. Those deceased were James M.. who 
died at the age of seventeen years; Lilly .\., 



who died at the age of eighteen ; Bertha and 
Angeline. who died of scarlet fever at the 
age of f(jur and two }-ears. respectively, 
and one who died in infancy. 

]Mr. Englesen has been a stanch Repub- 
lican since casting his first vote for General 
U. S. Grant in 1868, but he has never cared 
for political preferment. In the spring of 
1900 he was elected township assessor, and 
for some years was a member of the school 
board in Pontiac township. Religiously, he 
and his wife and daughters are members of 
the Lutheran church, while some of his sons 
hold memliership in the i\Iethodist Episco- 
pal church. His life has been one of indus- 
try and perseverance and he is deserving of 
the hioh reeard in which he is held. 



PATRICK H. KANE. 

Patrick H. Kane, the genial and popular 
proprietor of the Transient House of Pon- 
tiac. which is conveniently located near the 
Chicago & Alton Railroad depot, was born 
in Holyoke, Massachusetts, March 14, i860. 
a son of John and Mary (Lannan) Kane. m 

The father was a native of Ireland and as a il 
young man came to America, locating first 
in ^Massachusetts, where he worked in the 
woolen mills for many years, being night 
foreman for some time. On leaving that 
state in 1863 he came to Illinois and set- 
tled fi\e miles southwest of Ottawa. La 
Salle county, where he engaged in farming, ■ 
later following the same pursuit in Allen • * 
township, the same county. Selling out he 
came to Li\'ingston county and took up his 
residence in Xe\'ada township, but his last 
days were spent as a farmer in Sullivan 
township, where he held different township 



THE BIOGRArHICAL RECORD. 



127 



offices. He was a Democrat in politics and 
one of tlie early members of tlie Catholic 
church of Dwight. He died in July. 1895. 
antl his wife passed away in the fall of 1881. 

During his boyhood our subject attended 
the public schools of La Salle and Livings- 
ton counties, and at the age of eighteen years 
l)egan life for himself by working as a farm 
hand. lia\ing become thoroughly familiar 
with that occupation on his father's farm. 
Subsef|uently he went to Xel)raska and en- 
tered the emi)l(y of the L'nion Pacific Rail- 
road as brakenian on the line running from 
Lincoln to \'alparaiso and later to Strawns- 
burg on the main line, remaining with the 
company four years and four mi:)nths, after 
which he returned to Illinois. 

iNlr. Kane was married. July 2. 1881. 
the day President Garfield was shot, to Miss 
Rosa Young, a native of Lincoln, Illinois, 
and a daughter of Joseph Young, one of the 
early farmers of Saunders county. Nebraska. 
They lived in \'alparai.so, Nebraska, early 
in 1883, before returning to Pontiac, where 
Mr. Kane worked for H. C. Bruner as fore- 
man and burner at his tile and brick works, 
doing all the burning until he severed his 
connection with that gentleman in Jime. 
189O. For two years he had entire charge of 
the plant and Inirned eighteen or nineteen 
kilns a week. Later he was with John H. 
i-mith, when he run the factory, and had the 
entire confidence and respect of both gentle- 
men. Before leaving their employ be built a 
house in River ^'iew addition to Pontiac, 
which lie traded in 1895 *'"■ ^ hotel in Clav 
City, Illinois, but after conducting the latter 
for a year he returned to Pontiac, where he 
engaged in the restaurant, bakery and con- 
itctionery Inisiness until May 24, i899.when 
he bought the Transient House and has since 
successfully engaged in the hotel business. 



It is a nice two-story frame building, and 
in connection with this Mr. Kane owns a 
large lot. He also has a good hou.se and 
lot on Madison street and has successfully 
engaged in the real estate business for him- 
self, having owned a number of different 
places. 'He is a good, reliable business 
man, and the prosperity that has attended 
his efforts is certainly justly merited. 

Mr. Kane's first wife died while on a 
visit to her old home, in 1888. leaving two 
children, Elvira and Sadie, who are now 
being educated in a convent. In 1894 he 
married Mrs. Xancy Adams, of Pontiac, 
a daughter of Samuel Garner, who was one 
of the pioneer residents of this city and at 
one time a prominent property owner. 

As a Democrat Mr. Kane has e\er taken 
an actixe part in local politics, but has never 
been an aspirant for office, though he took a 
leading part in the political affairs of the first 
ward, and is to-day one of the most promi- 
nent Democrats in the ward where he is 
now living. 



S.V-MUEL H. BOYER. 

Samuel H. Boyer, a well-known livery- 
man and highly respected citizen of Dwight, 
Illinois, was born in Blair county, Penn- 
sylvania, July 25, 1858, a son of George 
W. and Mary Ann (Turnbaugh) Boyer. 
The Boyer family is of German origin and 
was founded in this country in early colonial 
da}s. His great-grandfather. John Boyer, 
was born in .\merica, and throughout life 
engaged in farming in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania. The grandfather, (ieorge 
Boyer. was born in that county, in 1800, 
and married Lydia Rupp, daughter of Jac<jb 
Rupp, who lived near Reading, and belonged 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to a family of German origin, \\hich was 
founded in Cumberland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, soon after the landing of William 
Penn. To George and Lydia (Rupp) Beyer 
were born six children : Jacob, John, George 
W., William, Samuel and Sarah. The father 
of this family died in Pennsylvania, at the 
age of sixty-eight years. He was a Lu- 
theran in religious belief and a Republican 
in politics. 

George A\'. Boyer, father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Februar}- 20. 1827, and accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Blair county, 
that state, \\here he engaged in farming se\'- 
eral years. He was reared on a farm and 
received a common-school education. On 
the 24th of May, 1849, li^ married Mary 
Ann, daughter of Henry and Catherine 
(Cherry) Turnbaugh, who were of German 
ancestry and lived near Altoona, Blair coun- 
ty. By this union were born seven children, 
namely : Henr}-, who married Nellie Mor- 
ris ; Annetta, who married James B. Austin ; 
Samuel H., our subject; Sarah C, wife of 
Dwight P. Mills; Climenia E., now Mrs. 
Muro Bertholic; Alfred A., of Dwight; and 
George W.. who died at the age of twelve 
years. The father was a member of Company 
E, One Hundred and Fourth Pennsyh'ania 
Volunteer Infantry, during the latter part 
of the Civil war, and was honorably dis- 
charged at Philadelphia, after which he re- 
turned to his home in Blair county. In 1867 
be came to Lix'ingston count}-, Illinois, and 
purchased a farm on section 20, Dwight 
township, where he resided until a few years 
ago, when he retired to Dwight. He has 
always affiliated with the Republican party 
and has held several township offices, in- 
cluding those of school director and road 
commissioner. Both he and his wife are 



members of the Lutheran church and are 
highly respected and esteemed by all who 
. know them. 

Samuel H. Boyer was only nine years 
of age on the removal of the family to this 
county, and in the schools of Dwight town- 
ship he acquired his education. He remained 
at home until twenty-five years of age. On 
the 30th of January, 1884, Mr. Boyer was 
united in marriage with Miss Jennie Lower, 
also a native of Blair county, Pennsylvania, 
and a daughter of Samuel and Mary E. 
(Downs) Lower, who were born in the 
same state. In early life her father learned 
the lilacksmith's trade, which he continued 
to follow until his retirement recently from 
active labor. He brought his family to Illi- 
nois in i86s and first located in Lanark, but 
a few years later came to Dwight, where 
he has since made his home, with the excep- 
tion of a short time spent in farming in 
Broughton township, this county. In 1891 
he built a hotel in Dwight, to which he gave 
the name of Pennsylvania House, and which 
he conducted for seven years, and where he 
still resides. In his family were ten chil- 
dren, of whom seven are now living, !Mrs. 
Boyer being the second in order of birth. 
Her mother died in February, 1898. To our 
subject and his wife have been born five 
children, namely : Harvey, Ehvood, Clar- 
ence, Ira and Ralph. 

After his marriage Mr. Boyer engaged in 
farming upon rented land for a time and 
then operated Mr. Lower's farm in Brough- 
ton township for six years. In the fall of 
1 89 1 he built a large livery stable in Dwight 
and to tliat place he removed in January of 
the following year, and has since devoted 
his time and attention to the livery business 
with good success. 

In politics Mr. Boyer is a Reijublican, but 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



129 



has never l»een an as])irant tor ctffice. He 
attends tlie Metliodist Ejjiscdpal church and 
affihates with Dwight Canii>. Xo. jjo, S. 
(if \'.. of which lie is captain ; Hebron Lodge, 
Xo. 513. I. O. O. ¥.. and Dwight Court of 
Honor. X<i. :;oS. 



JOHX ck.\r,r.. 

Jolin Craljl). who is industriously en- 
gaged in agricuhural pursuits upon a good 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres on 
section 9, Pike townsliip. Livingston coun- 
ty. Ilhnois. was l)orn in Forfarshire. Scot- 
land. July I. 1)^39, a son of James and Ce- 
celia ( Monroe ) Crabb, also natives of that 
country, where the mother died. The fa- 
ther was of English descent. 

Our subject was reared and educated in 
his native land and for three years prir)r 
to his emigration to America he worked in 
a foundrA-. At the age of eighteen he de- 
cided to try his fortune on this side of the 
Atlantic and took passage on a sailing ves- 
sel at Montrose. The voyage lasted six 
weeks, during which time they encountered 
two severe storms, but finally landed at Que- 
bec in safety in .\ugust. 1857, and proceeded 
at once to Tazewell county, Illinois, where 
his brothers, Henry and Archie, had pre- 
\iously located. They were joined b\' their 
father two or three years later and he made 
his home in this country throughout the re- 
mainder of his life, dying in 1875 ^^ ^''^ '''1"^ 
old age of eighty-one years. 

.\t first John Crabb worked on a farm by 
the mouth and later he and his brother, 
Archie, rented land and engaged in farm- 
ing together for seven years. At the end 
of that period the ])ro]>erty was divided and 
our subject came to Livingston county and 



])urcha.sed a tract of raw prairie land in 
Pike township, to Ihe improvement and 
cultivation of which he devoted his energies 
until 1889, when he sold that place and 
bought his present farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres of land on section 9, the same 
township. At that time it was only .slightly 
improved, but he has remodeled the resi- 
dence, tiled the land, erected good outbuild- 
ings and made many other improvements, 
transforming it into a most ilesirable farm. 

On the J5th of December, 1865. in Liv- 
ingston county. Mr. Crabb was united in 
marriage with Miss Hannah E. Capes, a 
sister of I)a\id D. Capes, whose sketch ap- 
pears on another i)age of this volume. She 
was born in Lincolnshire. England, but was 
only three years old when brought to this 
Country by her father, Willoughby Capes, 
who first settled in Tazewell county, Illi- 
nois. I)ut later came to Livingston countv. 
^Ir. and Mrs. Crabb have a family of seven 
children, namely: Charles, who is married 
and engaged in farming in this county : Wal- 
ter, at home; Ada, wife of Henry Beeks. 
a farmer of Benton county, Indiana ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of Lucius Phillips, a farmer of 
Pike township, this county; Dora, Ethel and 
Zephyr, all at home. 

Politically, Mr. Crabb was originally a 
Rejiublican, but of late years has supported 
the Democratic party, and being a friend of 
temperance he takes an interest in the Pro- 
l-.ibition movement. He was an efficient 
member of the school board for some vears 
and gives his support to every enterprise 
which he believes calculated to advance the 
moral, educational or social welfare of the 
community in which he lives. Religiously, 
both he and his estimable wife are earnest 
and consistent members of the Bethel Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 



I30 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



CHARLES A. McGKECOR. 

Few men are more ])n)minent <>i" nmre 
■\videlv known in tlie enterprising city of 
Pontine than the gentleman whose name 
introduces this sketcli. He was born in WW- 
mington, CHnton county, Ohio, IVIarch 14. 
1843. and is a son of John H. McGregor, 
who was born in Orange county. North 
CaroHna, August 30, 181 4. The grandfa- 
ther, John McGregor, a native of the higli- 
lands of Scotland, settled in North Caro- 
Hna on his emigration to this counry, and 
there he was a professor in an educational 
institution and also a land owner. \Vhen his 
son, John H., was three years old he re- 
moved with his family to Green River, Ken- 
tucky, where he purchased a large amount 
of land, but seven years later disposed of his 
property there and moved to Clinton coun- 
ty, Ohio, where he bought more land, mak- 
ing his home there throughout the remainder 
of his life. 

John H. McGregor, father of our sub- 
ject, was educated in Lcjuisville, Kentucky. 
and was admitted to the Ijar in Clinton coun- 
ty, Ohio. In Wilmington, Ohio, he was 
married, October 3, 1838, by Rev. Joseph L. 
Irvin, to J^Iiss Mary J. Buxton, who was 
born in W'arren county, that state, March 
27, 1 82 1, a daughter of Charles and Eliza 
(Vandoren) Buxton. Her father, who was 
of English birth, died when she was only 
four years old. At an early day the father 
of our subject removed to the territory of 
Iowa and located in Davenport, owning the 
original claim on which that city was 
founded in partnership with his^jrother and 
another gentleman. In 1850 he remo\ed to 
Ottawa, Illinois, where he engaged in the 
practice of law, having his ofifice with Dr. 
Stout, the noted abolitionist, and in Octo- 



ber, 1852. before the railroad was built, 
came to I'ontiac. where he was first engaged 
ii; practice with Mr. DeW'itt. the earliest at- 
torney of the ])lace. but later was a member 
of the firm of McGregor & Dart. He 
erected one of the first buildings of any 
size in the town, the lumber being hauled 
from Ottawa, a distance of forty miles, and 
was one of the most prominent citizens of 
tontiac in that day, as well as one of the 
leading lawyers of this section of the state, 
being engaged in practice with Lincoln, 
Caton and other illustrious men. He died 
Januarv 5, 1856, honored and respected by 
all who knew him. His wife is still living 
and is one of the two surviving charter mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church of Pontiac. 
He left five children, namelx' : Elizabeth, 
who married A. J. Laws, but is now de- 
ceased ; Emma, Charles A.. Alonzo H. and 
H. Burton, all residents of Pontiac. 

The early education of Charles A. Mc- 
Gregor, acquired in the public schools, was 
supplemented by a course at Dickinson Col- 
lege, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He left col- 
lege to return home and enlisted in the spring 
of 1863, joining Company C, Thirty-ninth 
Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, which was then 
stationed in front of Richmond. From that 
time on he was in all the engagements in 
which his regiment took part, including the 
battles around Richmond and Petersburg, 
and after Lee's surrender did provost duty, 
remaining in the service until December, 
1865, when he was honorably discharged. 

Returning to Pontiac Mr. ^IcGregor was 
interested in a grocery store one year. He 
had been practically brought up in the drug 
business, as from the age of thirteen years 
he had worked in a drug store when not in 
school until he entered the army, and so 
had acquired a very good knowledge of that 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'31 



business. As a clerk lie had charge (if the 
grocery store of Mr. Turner, but also re- 
ceived a percentage of the profits, and so 
was really interested in the business. In 
1807, in partnership with [. A. Caldwell, 
under the firm name of Caldwell & McGreg- 
or, he embarked in the drug business on his 
own account on Mill street, where business 
was carried on for a number of years, but 
in 1S72 they built a fine block on the corner 
of Mill and Madison streets, which at that 
time was the best business house in the city, 
it being 20x1 10 feet in dimensions and two 
stories in height. Here Mr. McGregor is 
still engaged in business, occupying all of 
the main floor, part of the second and most 
of the liasement. The firm built up the 
largest drug trade in this section of the state 
and about twenty years added to their stock 
a fine line of jewelry and silverware, which 
])roved quite i)rofitable. They also dealt in 
books, stationery, wall paper, etc. They 
erected the building adjoining their store and 
also owned another where the Sterry block 
now stands. In February. 1895, Mr. Mc- 
Gregor purchased his partner's interest and 
has since been alone in business. He has 
erected a number of business blocks, owning 
five buildings on the main business streets 
of the city besides the one he occupies, and 
also has considerable residence property and, 
with his children, owns several farms. He 
was one of the early stockholders of the 
Livingston County National Bank and an 
original stockholder of the Pontiac Nationni 
Bank, as well as a director of both. In 
business affairs he is energetic, prompt and 
notably reliable and carries forward to suc- 
cessful completion whatever he undertakes. 
On the 23d of November, 1871, Mr. 
McGregor married Miss Eunice J. Johnson, 
a native of Tohnson's Cross Roads, Green- 



brier county, \'irginia, and a daughter of 
Morris Johnson, who came to Pontiac about 
i860 and was here engaged in general mer- 
chandising and the stock business for man}' 
years. By this union were born five chil- 
dren, of whom three still live: Bernice E. ; 
VJWs J., now a student in the law depart- 
ment of the L'nivcrsity nf Michigan; and 
Lewis C. at home. I'hc wife and mother, 
who was a consistent member of the Meth- 
odist Episco])aI church and a most estimable 
woman, died in January, 1888. Mr. Mc- 
Gregor hi lids nienil)crship in the Presby- 
terian church and for many years has been a 
trustee of the same. He also took an active 
])art in Sunday school work for some years. 
He has never had time nor inclination for 
])olitical affairs, though he has served as 
alderman from his ward and ever stands 
ready to discharge any duty devolving upon 
him. 



HON. LAB.\X M. STROUD. 

Hon. Laban M. Stroud, who is now 
living a retired life on his farm near Pon- 
tiac, has been a resident of the state since 
1830. He is a native of Tennessee, born 
near the city of Nashville, Di.xon county, 
September 27, 1822, and is the son of 
'I'homas and Sally (Thompson) Stroud, the 
former a native of North Carolina, born in 
1791, and the latter a native of Virginia 
and daughter of Neal Thompson, who lo- 
cated in Tennessee in 1789, and there be- 
came a large and wealthy planter and where 
the remainder of his life was passed. Thomas 
Stroud was a son of Jesse and grandson of 
Peter Stroud, both of whom were natives 
of North Carolina, but of English and Irish 
ancestry. Jesse Stroud moved from North 



^y- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Carolina to Tennessee and located in Obion 
county, where he owned a large plantation 
and a number of slaves. 

Thomas Stroud grew to manhood in 
Tennessee and in 1812 married Sally 
Thompson, by whom he iiad a family of 
two sons and seven daughters, two only of 
the number now living, our subject and his 
sister, Mrs. Artimissa Higgs, now living 
with our subject. The other members of 
the family were Cassa R.. Fanetta, Sinia 
Sabury, l{!llen. Obedience Lee, Mourning 
Tilford, Julian and Milton P. 

Thomas Stroud was a soldier in the 
war of 1812 and served under General Jack- 
son. He was a planter in Tennessee for, 
some years after his marriage, but. with the 
desire to better provide for his family, he 
came to Illinois in 1830. tirst stopping in 
Sangamon county, where he spent one sea- 
son, and then moved to that portion of Taze- 
well county which was later detached and 
now forms the county of Logan. On settling 
in the latter county he took up a claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres, a part of which was 
government land, which he improved and on 
which he continued to live until his death, 
March 7, 1858. His wife passed away in 
1857. 

The subject of this sketch was eight 
years of age when he came with his parents 
to Illinois. His educational advantages 
were limited, but his advantages for work 
were not. The farm was to be improved, 
crops were to be planted and harvested, and 
he must do his share of the work. In his 
youth, however, he learned the carpenter's 
trade with his uncle. Colonel S. M. Thomp- 
son, but he continued to make his home with 
his parents until some years after attaining 
his majority. 

On the 7th of April, 1847. ^Ir. Stroud 



was united in marriage with Miss Eh'v 
Adams, who was born in Bedford county, 
Tennessee, January 9, 1826, and daughter 
of Captain John G. Adams, a native of one 
of the Carolinas. but who came to Illinois 
and located in Tazewell county in 1828, 
when his daughter was but two years old. 
He was in command of a cavalry companv 
in the Black Hawk war and was killed by 
the Indians. His wife was so shocked by the 
death of her husljand that she lost her mind 
and never recovered, though she lived many 
yeard afterward., dying when seventy-five 
years old. The family were of Scotch an- 
cestry and were early settlers of North Caro- 
lina, from which state they moved to Ten- 
nessee and later to Illinois. 

After his marriage Mr. Stroud bought 
one hundred and sixty acres of unimproved 
land, which he improved and on which he 
continued to live until 1879, in the mean- 
time adding to its area until it comprised a 
well improved farm of four hundred and 
twenty-five acres. Renting his place he 
moved to Minier, where he bought residence 
property and wliere he made his home for 
ten years. He then came to Livingston 
county and took up his residence on his 
farm adjoining the city of Pontiac, which he 
purchased at that time, comprising one hun- 
dred and sixty-three acres, all of which is 
under improvement. He had previously, in 
1885, purchased a farm of four hundred 
acres lying northeast of 'the city of Pontiac. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Stroud seven children 
were born. Louisa is the wife of H. H. 
Darnell, of Tazewell county, Illinois. Mar- 
tha is the wife of William Neal Mountjoy, 
of Logan county, Illinois. Thomas Frank 
resides in Omaha, Nebraska. Mrs. Sarah 
Jane Livesay is a resident of Livingston 
countv. Parmelia Annie resides at home. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



•33 



Joliii (I. is marriecl aiul is entjageil in farm- 
ing in Livingston county. Warren M. is 
carrying on the home farm, .\fter fifty-twi) 
\-ears of a happy wedded life Mrs. Stroud 
passed to licr reward December 5, iSgt), 
while on a visit to the old neighborhuod in 
Logan county, where so many years of her 
life were s])ent. Her remains were laid tn 
rest in the Xiblack cemetery, there tn wait 
the resurrection day. She was a faith fvU 
heliimeet to her husband, to whom she was 
greatly attached, and was a most loving 
mother. The familv and all who knew her 
in tliis life will always hold her in gr;iteful 
remembrance. 

I'olitically Mr. Stroud isa Jack.s<!n Dem- 
ocrat and he has been an earnest advocate 
of the principles of his party throughout 
life. His first presidential vote was cast for 
James K. Polk in 1844, and from that time 
to the present the nominee of his party lias 
always received his ballot. By his fellow- 
citizens he has been honored with \arious 
local ofHces. ser\ing for many years as a 
member of the coiuuy bnard of supervisors. 
In 1872 he was elected by his party a mem- 
ber of the Cieneral.\ssembly,the district com- 
prising the counties of Tazewell and Logan, 
and ser\ed two years, during which time he 
served on several inijjrotant committees and 
was known as a working member. Believ- 
ing that iithers shoidd serve, he declined 
further political honors. Since he was eigh- 
teen iif age Mr. Stroud has been a member 
of the Christian church and has e\er taken 
an interest in the work of the church and in 
the evangelization of the world. His good 
wife was also-a member of the same church. 
At the ])resent time his membership is with 
the church in Pontiac. 

Like thousands of the well-to-do luen of 
this countrv, Mr. Stroud began life with but 



little means, but he had health, a gond con- 
stitution, a stiiut heart and willing hands. 
lie was not afraid nf work, and with tem- 
])er;ile habits and an earnest desire to do 
right with his fellnw men. he has labored on 
until to-dav he is the owner of si.x well ini- 
l)ro\ed farms, comprising about two thou- 
sand acres, and is well content to live a (|uiet 
life, enjoying the fruits of his labor in the 
past, while others shall take up the more 
active duties. Well knuwn ;m<l universally 
respected, he can quietlv re\iew the jiast w ith 
the satisfaction nf cme wlm has nut lived in 
\ain. while those that know him can feel 
that the world is better for the life that he 
has li\'ed. 



WILLIAM T, CR.VWl'ORl). 

William T. Crawford, a prominent horse 
dealer, who has since 1875 been an active 
factor in the business life of I'lntiac, Illi- 
nois, was b(jrn in \'ew \'iirk City October 
13, i8_^_'. and is a son of .\ndrew and Eliz- 
abeth (Turner) Crawford, the former a 
native of Ireland, the latter of .Xew N'ork, 
where their marriage was celebrated, the 
father having come to this country when a 
voung man. Meeting with business reverses 
in the metroplis, he removed to Harrison 
count V, ( )hio. where he to(]k up laml and 
Commenced life anew in very limiteil cir- 
cumstances. Though the country where he 
settled was hilly and stonv and covered with 
a heavy growth of timlier. he steadily ])ros- 
pered, and by hard work, good management 
and close econ«)my he became possessed of 
considerable land, being (piite well off at 
the time of his death, which occurred in 
.Xovember, i88(>. The mother died on the 
old home farm in 1897. Both were faithful 



134 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



meml)ers of tlie Methodist Episcdpal church 
and were higlily esteemed in the cir.nniunity 
where they made their home. 

The subject of this sketch began his edu- 
cation in the schools of New Yori< Cit}', 
but was only eight years old when the family 
removed to Ohio. The school house nearest 
his father's home was two miles distance 
and the ]3ath lay through the wnods. His 
mother went \vitli him the first day, carry- 
ing a hatchet, with which she marked the 
trees that he might find his way lionie again 
at night. The school proved quite different 
from the one he had attended in the city, 
but he managed to acquire a good practical 
education. On leaving home, in 1 854, at the 
age of twenty-one years, he went to Scott 
county, Iowa, and spent one year on a farm 
some twentv miles west of Davenport. 

]\Ir. Crawford then returneil home and 
■was married, February 14, 1856, to Miss 
Sarah Johnston, daughter of Andrew John- 
ston, who was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and 
to them have been born six children, namely : 
Elizabeth, now the wife of Charles Strevelle, 
of Salt Lake City, Utah ; George A., who is 
in business with his father and has served 
as alderman in Pontiac; Ada, wife of Albert 
Dolde; Elmer, a resident of Montana; Will- 
iam, who has been connected with the Na- 
tional Bank of Pontiac for some years; and 
Maude, at home. 

In the spring of \H^('>. a short time after 
his marriage, Mr. L'rawford mo\-ed to 
Bloomington, Illinois, where he followed 
farming for three years, and then bought a 
farm in Tazewell county, which he operated 
six years. His ne.xt home was a farm north- 
west of Bloomington, nn which was laid out 
the town of Yuton, and on selling that place 
he mo\-ed to Bloomington. where he was en- 
gaged in the horse and cattle business for a 



number of years, beciuning a \-ery extensi\'e 
shipper of cattle and hogs. He was among* 
the first from that city to send cattle to the 
Union stockyards, Chicago, to be sold on 
ci^mmission, and was the first to ship horses 
there fur that purpose. He owned- the first 
car-load of horses e\er put in the old brick 
barn knuwn as the G:ioper barn, and has 
handled those animals on quite an extensive 
scale e\er since. He buys mainly in Iowa 
and Montana, and sells from three to five 
hundred western h(.irses ex'ery year, dealing' 
in draft horses and fine drivers. No one in 
this section handles as many as the Craw- 
fords — father and son — and they have met 
with most excellent success. Although he 
has traveled so extensively in the interests 
of his business and been brought in contact 
with all classes of iieople, Mr. Crawford has 
ne\-er tasted intoxicating drinks, and has 
led a most exemplary life, commanding the 
respect and confidence of all who know him. 
He has never taken an active part in poli- 
tics, ]ireferring" to give his undix'ided atten- 
tion to his business interests. 



JOHN DENEHE. 

It is said that biograjihy yields to no 
cither su1)ject in ])oint of interest and profit 
and is is especially interesting to note the 
])rogress that has been made along various 
lines of business by those of foreign birth, 
who have sought homes in America — the 
readiness with which they adapt themselves 
to the different methods and customs of 
America, recognize the advantages offered 
and utilize the o])portunities which the new 
world attords. \\'e find a worth}- repre- 
sentative of this class in John Denehe, the 



THE LiOGRAPniCAL RECORD. 



135 



present foreman of the locomotive and car 
dei)artnient at tlic rouiul house in Dwiglit. 
whicli is the end of the Peoria (U\ ision of 
tlie C'liicagfo & Alton Railroad. 

Mr. Henehe was I>orn in ci>unty Water- 
ford, Ireland, Decemher 23, 1846, a son of 
Edward and Margaret Denelie, farming peo- 
l>le, wliii spent their entire lives in that coun- 
trv. ( )ur suhect grew to manhood on the 
lK>me farm with \-ery limited educational ad- 
vantages. At the age of twenty years he 
crossed the ocean alone anil landed on .\mer- 
ican soil, a stranger in a strange land, lie 
stopped first in Xew \'(irk, and remaineil 
ahont three vears in that city and \icinity. 
where he \\:is eniplciycd as a gardener and 
farm lahorcr. 

.\t h'lathusli, Xew \i<vk, Mr. Denehe was 
marrie<l. .\ugust J, iS()8, to Miss Briilget 
Taylor, a nati\e of count}' West Meath, Ire- 
land, who came to this country ahont the 
same time as her husband. They have three 
sons: 'i'homas ]•".., inspector and repairer of 
cars at Dwight: William, who married 
limma Smith, of JJwight, and is now a tire- 
man on the Chicago & Alton Railroatl, and 
John E., at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Denehe moved 
to \ alparaiso, Indiana, where he worked in 
a saw-mill one season, and then went to Ee- 
mont, Illinois, where he was employed on 
the construction of the canal two years. In 
1871 he took up his residence in Blooming- 
ton and entered the shops of the Chicago & 
Alton Railroad, where he worked as car 
truck builder until the fall of iS/j. Xeed- 
iiig a reliable man at Dwight, the company 
sent Mr. Denehe there in September of that 
year to take charge of the car department. 
He held that jHisition until 1885, when he 
was promoted to foreman, in which capacit}' 
he has since served the road to their entire 



satisfaction. He has under him four men 
in the car department and seven in the lo- 
comotive de[)artnient, besides seven regular 
train crews. He also has charge of their 
shop at \\'ashington, Illinois, and for some 
lime had charge of those at Eacon and 
Streator. He came U< the new world with 
the hope of making his fortune and his 
lireams have been more than realized, and 
he is to-day a well-to-do man. Besides his 
])leasant residence in Dwight, erected by 
him in 1874, he has a fine farm of six hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Trego county, Kan- 
sas. He is intelligent and well informed 
and that he has pro\-ed an efficient and x'alued 
cniplciyee is proxed by his long retention 
with one company, for he has now been with 
liie Chicago iS; Alton Railroad Com])any for 
twenty-eight years. His success in life is 
(hie entire!}' to his own well-directed and 
energetic efforts, for he came to this coun- 
try empty-handed and has had to make his 
own way in the world unaided. He and his 
family are communicants of the Catholic 
church, and he is identified w ilh the Republi- 
can i^art}'. He takes an acti\e interest in 
public affairs and has efticiently servetl as 
.school trustee. Eratcrnallv, he is a mem- 
ber of the Ancient (_)rder of Hiijernians, 
and was one of the charter members of the 
lodge in Dwight. He has held all the offices 
in the lodge, l)eing active in the order as 
\\ell as in public affairs. 



Hi:RM.\X EOM.M.VTSCH. 

Many of the most enteri)rising and pri/- 
gressive farmers r)f Livingsttjn cciunty have 
come from the land beyond the sea. and al- 
though they had no capital when the}' lo- 



136 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cated liere they are now prosperous and suc- 
cessful. Among the most prominent of tliese 
is Herman Lommatsch, wlio owns and oc- 
cupies on excellent farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres on sections 23 and 24, I'ike 
township, and also has property elsewhere 
in the county. 

He was horn in Saxon\-. (ierniany, Oc- 
tober. 27. 1835. '^''"' ^^'^^ reared on a farm 
in his native land, at the same time attentl- 
ing school for eigljt years. In 1854, at the 
age of nineteen, he came to America with 
his father. \\'illiam Lommatsch. taking i)as- 
sage on a sailing vessel at Bremen and ar- 
riving in Xew ^'ork after a \i)\age of six 
^\'eeks. They ])roceeded at once to Cincin- 
nati, and from there went to Riple\' county. 
Indiana, where for fi\e ^■ears our subject as- 
sisted his father in opening up a farm. 

There !Mr. Lommatsch was married, in 
June, t8^C), to Augusta I'ellwock. also a 
native of Saxony, who came to the new 
world when a girl of tweKe \ears and grew 
to womanhood in Indiana. Ily this union 
ha\e been born nine children. namely :Kmma. 
Wife of Jonathan Chicodanse. a farmer of 
Pike township, Lixingston county: Laura, 
wife of Fred Altnian, of the same comity; 
Theodore, who is married and li\es on the 
farm in Pike township, where Mr. Lom- 
matsch first settled: Louis, w lio is married 
and follows farming in the same township: 
Charles, who is married and enga.ged in 
business in Chenoa ; Herman 1-., a farmer 
of Eppards I'tiiiU township; Melan, a 
farmer, at honie : Lena and Xettie, both at 
home. 

After his marriage ^Ir. Lommatsch con- 
tinued to engage in farnnng upon his fa- 
ther's place in Ripley county. Iniliana, for 
two years. In 1861 he came to Livingston 
county, Illinois, and purcha.sed eighty acres 



f)f land in Pike township, but for two years 
he operated a rented farm in Eppards Point 
townshi].). and then located upon his own 
place, which he impros'ed by the erection 
of a comfortable resilience. That farm was 
his home for several years, during which 
time he added to it a tract of one hundred 
and forty acres adjoining, so that he had 
two hundred and twenty acres in all. Sub- 
scc|uently he purchased eighty acres wdiere 
he now resides, and located thereon in 1878. 
He has extended the boundaries of his place 
until the\' now include three hundred and 
twenty acres, and to its improvement and 
cidtivation he has devoted his energies with 
excellent results. He has erected a large, 
neat residence, a commodious barn, cribs and 
sheds, has tiled the land, set out shade and 
fruit trees, and has converted it into one 
of the most desirable farms in the township, 
i'.esides his valuable property he has an- 
other farm of one hundred and si.xty-seven 
acres in Eppards Point township. His suc- 
cess is due to his industry, energy and i)er- 
severance. and c<imes as a fitting reward for 
honest toil. J'olitically, ]\lr. Lommatsch is 
a stanch Republican, and religiouslv he and 
l-.is famil\- are members of the I'^-vangelical 
cluu'ch. 



JOSIAH X. I'..\RR. 

For forty-five years this gentleman has 
been identified witli the agricultural interests 
of Livingston county, and now owns antl 
operates a well-improved farm of one hun- 
dred and eighty acres on section 17, F'lsmen 
township. He was born in Lancaster coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, July 6, 1833, and is a son 
of Jacob and Susan (Rarr) Barr. also na- 
tives of Pennsvlvania and of German de- 




J. N. BARR. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



139 



scent. Our subject's paternal grandtatlier. 
Jacob Barr. Sr.. was one of the pioneers of 
I ancaster county, wbere tlie family con- 
tinued ti> make their home until 1836, when 
tiie parents of our subject moved to Clark 
county, Ohio, and tliere tiie father cleared 
and improved a farm. In that county they 
spent the remainder of their lives, the mother 
dyinji' January, 1846. and the fatlier in 1848. 
At the death of the mother there were seven 
children living, of whom five yet survive: 
Jacob, cif Lawrence county. Illinois: Josiah 
X.. oiu" subject; Cyrus, of Dwight, Illinois; 
Susan, now Mrs. Kemp, of Iowa, and Laura 
B., now Mrs. Foy, a widow living in Wash- 
ington county, Nebraska. The oldest daugh- 
ter. Elizabeth, died in November, 1846. 

Josiah N. Barr was fifteen years old 
<it the time of his father's death. He then 
went to work for various farmers, and con- 
tinued to be thus employed in that vicinity 
mitil he was twentj'-one years old, in the 
meantinie securing a fair common scimol e<l- 
tication. and then came to Illinois, in 1834. 
locating first in Kane county, where he 
worked by the month as a farm hand for one 
year. At llie cn<i of that time lie purcliased 
one liundretl and si.xty acres of land on sec- 
tion 17, Esmen township, Livingston countv, 
where he now resides, to its improvement 
and cultivation he has since devoted his en- 
ergies with tiie e.xception of the time spent 
in his country's service during the Civil war. 
He broke about half of this tract before en- 
tering the army. It is now a well improved 
place, being tiled, fenced and under a high 
state of culti\ation. The buildings are neat 
and .substantial, and tiie whole farm indicates 
the thrift and enterjjrise of the owner. 

On the 30th of August, 1862. Mr. I'arr 
enlisted in Company M, I'irst Illinois Ar- 
tillery, which was organized at Camp Doug- 



las and sent from there to Louisville, spend- 
ing the time from October until the follow- 
ing J'cbruary in Kentucky in ])ursuit of 
Morgan. They ne.xt went down the Ohio 
and uj) the Cumberland rivers, joining Rose- 
crans at Fort Donelson, where they were 
held in reserve for a time, afterward going 
to Naslnille and Franklin. As a re.serve 
corps tliey proceeded to Chickamauga, in 
whicli engagement they took ])art. it being 
their first important battle. . Later they 
were in the battle of Missionary Ridge, and 
were sent with Sherman to relieve the forces 
at KnoxviJJe. ( )ii the Jd day of May, 1864, 
they started on the .\tlanta campaign, and for 
ninety da\s were under fire almost constant- 
ly. They i)articii)ated in the battle of Kene- 
saw Mountain and assisted in the capture 
of Atlanta, after which the artillery was sent 
back to Chattanooga, where thev were on 
duty until the following spring, and then 
])roceeded to Cleveland, Tennessee, remain- 
ing there until the clnse i)f the war. .Mr. 
Harr was honor;ibly discharged at Camp 
Douglas July J^. 1865. He had lost but 
little time on ;iccount of sickness, and, al- 
though disabled for dnt_\- a sJiort time, lie w;is 
ne\er in the Imspital. 

-Mr. r>arr w:is married, in Livingston 
county. December 24. 187J, to Miss Tinnie 
.\nnis, a nati\e of London, Englanil, and a 
tlanghter of .Mr. Chalmers. .\s her father 
died when she was (piite small, she was 
adojjted by a Mrs. .\nnis. with whom she 
came to America during childhood. They 
located first in \ ermont. but when she was 
about nine years of age moved to Nebraska, 
where she grew to womanhood. She died 
.September jj. 1895, and was laid to rest 
in the Esmen cemetery. By this union were 
born four children, namely: Lutie, who is 
now keeping house for her father; Lorenzo 



140 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



N., a pliarmacist, \\'lio is now engas^ed in tlie 
drug business in Idaho, and Tlieda M. and 
Loren C, both at home. 

Islv. Barr cast his first j^residential vote 
for John C. Fremont, in 1856, and as a Re- 
])ubHcan lie has since taken an active and 
prominent part in local politics. He helped 
organize his tnwnship and was elected first 
collector, in which capacity he .served for 
two years. He was township trustee six 
years, and at interxals has filled the office of 
supervisor for twelve years, during which 
time he served on various important commit- 
tees. He has also been a delegate to nu- 
merous county conventions of his party, and 
whate\er position he has been called upon 
to fill, it duties he has always faithfull}^ and 
satisfactorily performed. He was a member 
of the Wesleyan Methodist church until it 
was disbanded, and now attends the Method- 
ist Episcopal church, to which he contributes 
liberally. He takes quite an active and 
jirominent ])art in church and Sabbath school 
work, and is now serving as superintendent 
of the Sabbath school. He has witnessed 
the wonderful development and progress 
made in this region in the last half-century, 
has seen Pontiac grow from a cross roads 
town of two stores to be one of the important 
cities in this section of the state, and in the 
work of advancement he has e\er borne an 
active part and is numbered among the most 
useful and valued citizens of his comnumitv. 



XELSOX COUXTRYMAX. 

Xelson Countryman, deceased, was for 
several years prominently identified with the 
business interests of Pontiac, where he lo- 
cated in 1859, and bore an active part in the 



early develnijment of the city. He was born 
in St. Johnsxille. Xew York, July ir, 1832, 
a son I if Jacob Cnuntrx-man. The father, 
who belonged to an old Xew York family, 
was a shipbuilder by trade, and also engaged 
in the i^ractice of law in that state. For a 
time he made his home in Syracuse and 
later in Buffalo, and built many of the early 
lake boats. On coming west he soon located 
in Ottawa, Illinois, where he purchasetl land 
and engaged in farming until 1859, which 
year witnessed his arrival in P'ontiac, \\here, 
as a well-to-do man he li\ed retired until his 
death, which occurred ten or fifteen vears 
later. He erected one of the first brick 
stores on the square. Religioush", he was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

X'elson Countryman was educated in the 
schools of Syracuse and Buffalo, Xew York, 
and later accompanied his parents rm their 
removal to Ottawa, Illinois. As previously 
stated the family came to this county in 
1859, and our subject bought and openetl up 
the first stone quarry near Pontiac, it being- 
three-quarters of a mile northeast of the 
court house, and for this land he gave two 
hundred dollars per acre. From his quarry 
nearly the stone for the foundations of 
buildings in the city were obtained. He did 
a large and prosperous business, furnishing 
employment to many men, and had the name 
of being one of the best workmen in his line 
in this seceion of the state. He c<.intracted 
to put in foundaticins and also shipped rock 
and sand. 

On the 3(1 of October, 1854, INIr. Coun- 
tryman married Miss Paskalenia Reynolds, 
and to them were born two children, namely : 
Mary E.. wife of D. B. Shiland, of Pontiac, 
and ?ilinnie, wife of Frank Sinclair, also of 
Pontiac. Beniamin B. Reynolds, Mrs. 
CountrvmanV father, was born in Lewiston, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



141 



Minlin county. Pennsylvania. June 10. 1810. 
an<l there inarrieil rjeamn" Scut'ield. who was 
horn in Clearfield. Clearfield eountv, Penn- 
sylvania. August 14, 181J. He was en- 
gaged in the hanlware husiness in I,e\viston 
until 1833, when, with his wife and two chil- 
dren, he removed to Ottawa, Illinois, being 
one of its first settlers. He had lost a fort- 
une of nearly fifty thousand dollars by the 
I'aiiure of the state to jiav for an ac(|ueduct. 
In La Salle county, he purchased six hun- 
dred anil forty acres of land six miles from 
Ottawa, where he made his home until 1877, 
and then went to Indiana, but his last days 
were passed in Texas. His brother. Dr. 
John P. Reynolds, was killed at the Alamo, 
and his property, consisting of four thou- 
sand and forty-seven acres of land and two 
thousand dollars fell to Mrs. Countryman's 
father and his sister in Indiana. The fa- 
ther went south to take possession ui the land 
antl located every acre. The property also 
included thirteen houses and lots in Wells 
Point, Texas. He died in that state Febru- 
ary 2, 1882, leaving eight children, his wife 
passed away February 16. 1874. P)oth were 
active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and were people of prominence in 
the community where they resided. 

Mrs. Countryman was reared on a farm 
near Ottawa and was mostly educated by her 
father, who had been a professor of sciiools 
for thirty years. He also served as super- 
visor of his township for over forty years, 
and was considered the leading man of the 
community, his fellow citizens always gi\- 
ing him their political support regardless of 
party lines. He also took an active interest 
in state affairs, and was well acquainted with 
l^incoln and other prominent politici.ans cif 
his day. 

Mr, and Mrs. Countrvman resided for 



a short time in Wisconsin, and then returned 
to Ponliac. where she has since made her 
home at .\'o, 313 I'.ast Lix'ingston street. 
Here be died b'cbruary 23, 1886, Through 
bis own well-directed efforts he acijuired a 
comfortable competence, and also won by an 
honorable, upright life, an untarnished name, 
and the record which he left behind is one 
well worth)' of emulation. Since her hus- 
band's death Mrs. Comitryni:ui has carried 
on the business and (|uarry interests and has 
met with marked success. ba\ing more or- 
tlers than she can till, although she knew 
nothing of the business when it came under 
her management. She gives employment 
to ten men, and ships stone quite extensively, 
having the only quarry in this neighborhood. 
Jt is a \-ery valuable piece of property, co\- 
ering two acres of the eighteen and a half 
tract which she owns. She is a member of 
the liaptist church, and is honored, mU alone 
for her business ability, but for her straight- 
forward, womanly course and true nobility 
of character. Her circle of friends and ac- 
iiuaintances is e.\tensi\'e. 



WALTER HART, 

Walter Mart, a successful florist now en- 
gaged in business at a'o, 507 North Ladd 
street, Pontiac. Illinois, was Ixjrn near Xor- 
age, England, February 27, 1833, and when 
eighteen years of age emigrated to Amer- 
ica with his i)arents, Ceorge and Mary Ann 
(Locke) Hart, also natives of England, 
where the father earned a livelihood as 
a fisherman. The family settled near 
Aurora, in Kane county, Illinois, where 
the father engaged in farming until a 
few vears before his death, when he came 



142 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to Pdiitiac, w here he passed awa}- SeiJteniber 
15. 1884. at the age of seventy-three years. 
After his death the mother lived with our 
suhject and at his home she died Decemljer 
9, 1884, at the age of nearly eighty-four. 
They had a family of nine children, all Ixiru 
in England, but only three are now li\ing. 
namelv: Dennis, a farmer of Sac county. 
Iowa : George, a machinist of Des Moines. 
Jowa, and Walter, our suhject. The others 
all (hed in England, with the exception of 
^Irs. Alehalah Huggins. who died in Dwight, 
Illinois. 

^\'alter Hart never left the home of his 
parents until his father's death. He ob- 
tained the greater part of his literary educa- 
tion in the evening schools of Norage, Eng- 
land, and for a brief time after coming to 
this country attended school in Bristol, Ken- 
dall county, Illinois, where his father was 
engaged in farming. In November, 1875, 
he came to Pontiac with his parents and 
entered the employ of the Illinois State Re- 
formatory as gardener, remaining in their 
employ for two years, after which he leaseil 
a greenhouse on Maplewood avenue, and en- 
gaged in business there as a florist for fi\e 
years. The following eight years he carried 
on business in the northern part of the cit}-. 
and then purchased his present place at Xo. 
507 North Ladd street. Here he constructed 
:i greenhouse, but his business has increased 
50 rapidly that it is fast outgrowing his pres- 
ent (|uarters. A man of artistic tastes and 
go(vd Imsiness ability, he has met with suc- 
cess in his chosen calling. He lias been a 
life-long member of the Methodist church, 
and his career has ever been such as to com- 
mend him to the confidence and high regard 
of all with whom he has come in contact, 
either in business or social life. In his po- 
litical views he is a Republican. 



In i860, in Kendall county, Illinois, was 
celebrated the marriage of ]\Ir. Hart and 
;\Iiss Sarah Springer, of that county, the 
sixth child of James and Katherine Springer. 
She was bi un in Indiana and came to this 
state with her parents when quite young. 
Tn Mr. and ISIrs. Hart were born seven chil- 
dren, namely: Anna C., who died at the age 
of one year and eleven months; Sebina, who 
died in Pontiac at the age of five months; 
one who died in infancy unnamed; James 
\\ .. who married Laura McKinsev. of Mc- 
Dowell, Illinois, and is an electrician in the 
emplo)' of the Electric Light Company of 
I'ontiac ; Marv Ann, wife of Pearl Carrier, 
a farmer of Chenoa, Illinois; .\deline, wife 
I if Charles Page, a painter and paper hanger 
of I'ontiac, and George R., who is employed 
i:; a shoe factor^• in Pontiac. 



JOHN H.KNCOCK. 

John Hancock, whose home is on section 
25, Pike townshii), Li\ingston county, is one 
of the most preeminent and influential citi- 
zens of his commimity. He takes an active 
and commendable interest in public affairs, 
and gives his support to all enterprises which 
he believes will prove of public lienefit or 
will in any wa_\' ad\ance the interests of his 
adoptetl county. 

Mr. Hancock was born in Franklin coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, January 13, 1839, a son of 
John and Catherine (Mooney ) Hancock, na- 
li\es of iMaryland and Pemisylvania, re- 
s]iectively. Throughout the greater por- 
tion of his life the father made his home in 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania, his time and 
attention being devoted to agricultural pur- 
suits, and he died there in 1875. His wife, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



143 



who still survives him. a liale and hearty nld 
lady of seventy-five years, continues to re- 
side on the old homestead with lier xnunt^- 
est son, Solomon Hancock. 

During^ his boyhood our suhject attended 
the common schools and remained in his na- 
tive county until eighteen years of age. when 
he came to Illinois, locating in McLean 
county. March i, 1857. There he worked 
by the month tor two years, and then came 
to Livingston county, operating rented land 
in I'ike township until the imtbreak of the 
Civil war. On the 14th of June, 18O1, he 
enlisted for three years, in Company .\. 
First Illinois Cavalry, which was assigned 
to the western army, and his tirst engagement 
was at Lexington, Missouri. He partici- 
pated in numerous skirmishes in that state 
and .\rkansas, and was in active service two 
years, being mustered out and honorably 
discharged at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, 
in 1863. After his return from the war Mr. 
Hancock continued to engage in farming 
upon rented for several years, after which 
he speculated in farm property quite exten- 
sively, buying and selling several places. In 
1878 lie purchased his. present farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, on section 25, Pike 
township, and has since successfully engaged 
in its operation. He has erected thereon 
good and substantial buildings, and has made 
many other improvements, which add greatlv 
to the value and attractive appearance of the 
place, making it one of the best farms of its 
size in the township. By untiring industry 
and sound judgment he has won a merited 
success in his undertakings, and is in all re- 
spects worthy the high regard in which he 
is held by his fellow citizens. 

On the 2d of June, 1863, in Livingston 
county, while home on a furlough, Mr. Han- 
cock was united in marriage with Miss 



Rachel Campbell, who was born antl reared 
in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and 
is a daughter of Archibald Campbell, a 
teacher by profession, and a life-long resi- 
tlent of the Keystone state. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Hancock were \x)t\\ five children, 
namely: Ida, wife of Harry Reed, of Pon- 
tiac; Lettie, Charles, Josephine and Bessie, 
all at home. Josephine was educated at the 
Pontiac high school and is now one of the 
successful teachers of the county, and Bessie 
is now a student at the Chenoa high school. 
Formerl}- Mr. Hancock was identified 
with the Republican party and cast his first 
presidential ballot for Abraham Lincoln, in 
i860, but is now a stanch Democrat, and 
takes quite an active and prominent part in 
local politics and public affairs, having served 
his fellow citizens as township collector, com- 
missioner of highways and a member of the 
school board. He has filled the last position 
for some \cars and is now president of the 
board. As a citizen he ever stands ready 
to discharge any duty devolving upon him, 
and has taken an active interest in promot- 
ing the welfare of his township and county, 
his patriotism being manifest in days of peace 
as well as when he followed the old flag 
to victory on southern battle fields. He is 
an honored member of the Grand Army Post 
of Chenoa, and both he and his wife hold 
membership in the Presbyterian church of 
that place, with which he has been connected 
since I8^8. 



JOHN STEWART. 

John Stewart is a well known rejjre- 
sentative of the business interests of Dwight, 
Illinois, where he is extensively engaged in 
contracting and building, and also deals in 



'44 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lunilier and cual. Of excellent business abil- 
ity and bniad resources, he has become one 
of the well-to-do citizens of tiie place. He 
has won success by his well-directed, ener- 
getic efforts, and the prosperit)- that has 
come to him is certainly well deserved. 

Mr. Stewart was born in the north of 
Ireland June ii. 1846. and is a son of John 
and Mary A. (McKelvey) Stewart, also 
natives of Ireland, but of Scotch parentage. 
There the father learned the weaver's trade, 
A\hich he followed until his emigration to 
America in 1850, bringing with him his 
family, consisting of wife and eight children. 
He located in Warrensburg. Warren coun- 
ty. New York, and accepted a position as 
finisher in a tannery, but he was not long 
permitted to enjoy his new home, for he 
died five years after his arrival, at the age 
of sixty-three. He had ten children : Jane, 
\\'illiam, Mary A., Robert, Thomas, Eliza- 
beth. Ellen, Margaret, John and Rosa, all 
still living, but none residing in this county 
with the exception of our subject. He has 
one brother and three sisters in Aurora, 
Kane county; one sister in Kendall county, 
Illinois; a brother in Missouri, and the 
others are in New York state. 

Our subject was only four years old when 
brought by his parents to this country, and 
he received his education in the common 
schools and seminary of Warrensburg, New 
York. After leaving school he worked in 
lumber mills for four years, and on the 1 5th 
of March, 1865, came to Aurora, Illinois, 
working one year on a farm in Sugar Grcne 
township, Kane county. He then entered 
the car shops of the Chicago, Burlington & 
Ouincy Railroad, where he followed the 
trade of a carbuilder four years, but on the 
advice of his physician he again turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. Going to 



Grundy county, Illinois, he rented a farm for 
a vear and a half, and then came to Livings- 
tun county, pm-chasing a farm of eighty acres 
(if im])rii\-ed land in Ne\:i la tciwnship, to 
the culti\ation nf which he at once turned 
his attention. About six years later he 
bought another eighty-acre tract, making in 
all a fine farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 12, Nevada township, which 
he thoroughly tiled and placed under a high 
state of cultivation. He gave the greater 
[jart of his time and attention to the raising 
of st(_ick, feeding from two to three car- 
loads of cattle per year and one of hogs. In 
this way he more than used all of the grain 
raised upon his own land. After fourteen 
years devoted to agricultural pursuits, Mr, 
Stewart moved to Dwight in the spring of 
1890 and commenced working at the carpen- 
ter's trade. Since the fall of 1891 he has en- 
gaged in contracting and building on his 
own account and has erected many of the 
fine residences in the place. In 1900 he 
])urchased the coal business of F. B. Chester, 
known as the Dwight Coal Company, and 
now carries it on in connection with his 
other Ijusiness. 

On the 14th of September, 1870, Mr. 
Stewart was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary E. \^eale, a native of Grundy county, 
Illinois, and a daughter of Charles and Mary 
\'eale, who were born in England and came 
to this country in early life, settling in Grun- 
dy county, where Imth died when Mrs. Stew- 
art was a child of four years. She then 
made her home with her uncle, John Vick- 
erv. Thev were among the first settlers 
i)f Grundy count}- and while improving his 
l;:nd ^Ir. A'eale lived in a wagon. To Mr. 
and ^Irs. Stewart were born three children, 
namely: Ernest P., who died on his thir- 
teenth birthday and the anniversary of his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



145 



parents" marriage: Xellie O.. who was grad- 
uated from the Dwight h'gli school in tlie 
spring of 1899 and is at home; and Roliert 
Earl, aged ten vears. is still in school. 

Mr. Stewart is an earnest memher of 
the .Methodist Episcopal church, has always 
Ined up ti) his jirofessions and taken an ac- 
tive part in churcli work. He lias heen an 
official nieniher for the past si.xteen years 
and is now trustee of the church and super- 
intendent of the Sunday school. Eraternally 
he is a memher of Dwight Lodge. Xo. 513, 
I. (). (). E., of which he is deputy, and po- 
litically is a Prohihitionist and served as 
a delegate to the county conventions of his 
])arty and as chairman of the township Pro- 
hihition committee. When there is no Pro- 
hihitinn ticket in the field he sup])iirls the 
Repuhlican party. Eor the last four years 
he has heen an active and efficient mem- 
ber of the village hoard of trustees and has 
been chairman of the water works committee 
for the past three years, during which time 
the system has been im])roved and a stand- 
pipe placed. He has the entire confidence 
and respect of his fellow citizens and is held 
in high regard I)y all with whom he comes in 
contact, either in business nr scKial life. 



SAML"I:L (iOODWILL .MORKISOX. 

.Samuel (inodwill Morrison, a promi- 
nent farmer of Avoca townshi]) and a worth}' 
representative of one of its old and honored 
families, was Ijorn in the house he now oc- 
cupies October 20, 1857, a sou of Samuel 
and Mary A. (Rockwood) Morri.son, both 
of whom were born near Buffalo, Xew 
^'i>rk. and with their respective parents came 
tci Illinois when children, being married in 
this state. Our subject's paternal grand- 



father only lived a few years after settling 
in Livingston county, and his wife did not 
long survive him. They were pioneers of 
the county and made their home near where 
our subject now resides. The Rockwood 
lamily were also among the early settlers, 
who. by persistent labors, subdued the wild 
l)rairie lauds and made homes for their de- 
scendants. The grandparents both died in 
Livingston county. The father was one of 
the most successful farmers of .\\oca town- 
ship, where at one time he owned five hun- 
dred acres of land, but later sold all but two 
hundred and forty-four .-icrgs. which he re- 
tained as a home ])lace. This was .school 
land when he ])urchased it and abounded 
with pniirie grass and rattle snakes, but he 
impro\e<l and ci>n\erle(l the same into one 
of the most fruitful and valuable farms of 
his locality. In politics he was a Republican 
and held minor offices in the township, which 
were thrust upon him, as he never sought 
political honors. His first wife died in 1866. 
Si.x children were born to them, four sons 
and two daughters, namely: Betsy, who 
died in infancy: Susan .\., wife of C. D. 
Hering. of Indiana; John O., an employee 
of H. O. Babcock. of Pontiac ; George D., 
a successful farmer of .\voca township; 
James ).. a resident of Spear, Xebraska; 
and Samuel G., our subject. For his second 
wife the father married Maria Phillips, of 
Livingston county, by whom he had seven 
children: Xellie. wife of Joel W. Banker, 
of Pontiac ; Joseph C, of I'age county. Iowa ; 
Lenora. wife of Charles Friant, of .Avoca 
township; \\'illiam R., of Owego township; 
Harry L., of Lodemia; iMary, who lives 
with our subject; and Charles, a farmer of 
.\voca township, .\fter a successful and 
hou(jrable career the father died at home 
May I, 1884, at the age of sixtv-five vears. 



146 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



During liis Imyliorid Samuel (i. Morri- 
son pursued liis studies in tlie district scliool 
near his home and when his efhication was 
completed he worked witii his father on the 
farm until the latter's death, when he was 
appointed administrator of the estate. He 
purchased the interests of the other heirs 
in the home farm and now has one hundred 
and eighty acres, on which he is successfully 
engaged in general farming and raising stock 
for market. 

On the 1 8th of February, 1892, Mr. 
Morrison was united in marriage with Miss 
Rose Gregg, who was born in Osceola coun- 
ty, Iowa, in 1868, and he brought his bride 
to the farm which has since been their home. 
Two children bless their union : I\-an G. 
and Samuel \\'.. both bright boys. ]Mrs. 
Morrison is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and her husband is a supporter 
of the same. He holds membership in the 
Modern Woodmen Camp, Xo. 6, of Fair- 
bury, and n politics always affiliates with 
the Republican party, though he would never 
accept public office other than school di- 
restor, a position he acceptably filled for 
twelve years. He has led a quiet, uneventful 
life in the same neighborh(X)d where there 
are many who were his boyhood friends, and 
those who know him best hold him in the 
highest regard. His genial, pleasant man- 
ner makes him quite popular, and he is rec- 
ognized as a valued citizen of the com- 
munitv. 



DAVID E. CAPES. 

David E. Capes, a successful ice dealer 
of Pontiac, is a native of Illinois, his birth 
occurring June 16, 1862,, six miles south 
of Washington, in Tazewell county. His 



parents, Willoughby and Elizabeth ( Milner) 
Capes, were born, reared and married in 
Lincolnshire, England, where they continued 
to make their home until after the birth of 
three of their children. Then the family, in 
1852, came to the new world and settled in 
Washington, Illinois, where for two years the 
father supported his wife and children by 
workingasadaylaborer at fifty cents per da\-. 
The second year he was able to purchase a 
horse, and the following year bought another, 
after which he engaged in farming on his 
own account, operating rented land for 
eleven years. At the end of that period he 
purchased one hundred and si.xty acres of 
raw prairie land on section 9, Pike township, 
Livingston county, for which he paid se\en 
dollars and a quarter per acre. He located 
thereon in the spring of 1864, aiid at once 
turned his attention to the improvement and 
cultivation of his place, soon converting it 
into a most desirable farm. In connection 
with general farming he was also engaged 
in stock raising, and each fall shipped a car- 
lod of hogs to market. He built a fine house 
upon his place and made many other im- 
provements, costing as much as two sections 
of land would have cost when he purchased 
his property. As an agriculturist he met 
with marked success and was able to assist 
his sons in getting a start in life. He was 
one of the early members of the Bethel 
Methodist Episcopal church at Greymont, 
which he helped to establish, and was one 
of the main standbys in the erection of the 
house of worship. From the first he served 
as steward of the church, and was recognized 
as one of the most honest, honored and 
highly respected men of his community. 
He was never an aspirant for ofifice, but was 
always a consistent and earnest Republican, 
and never failed in his duties of citizenship. 



i 




WILLOUGHBY CAPES. 




D. E. CAPES. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



151 



He was lidrn at Mar's Chapel, near (irimsey, 
Lincolnshire, England, October 18, 1819. 
and died October 4, 1899. He was united 
in marriage with Elizal)eth Milner. in 1844, 
and they became tiie parents of thirteen chil- 
dren. She was born in Yorkshire, England, 
March 13. 1827. in her seventeenth year 
she was converted and joined the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and iicr lite was freely 
given to the labors of the church, and her in- 
fluence upon Bethel community will be felt 
in the years tt) come. After a long illness 
she fell asleep September 4, 1898. 

Our subject was the eighth in order of 
birth in the family born to this worthy 
ci luple. 1 )uring his boyhood he attended the 
l>ublic schools of Pike township, and aided 
his father in the work of the home farm vmtil 
he attained his majority. On the 28th of 
December, 1882, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Alice A. i'iper, of Rock Creek, 
Illinois, and they now have two children; 
Delbert R., born January 8, 1884, and Cora 
Belle, born February i, 1886. Both are now 
attending the high school of Pontiac. 

After his marriage Mr. Capes remained 
at home until the fall of 1883, when he pur- 
chased eighty acres of raw prairie land only 
three miles from Pontiac — a rare thing for 
that late date. He had no money and it was 
only with the help of his father as security 
for the first payment that he was able to pur- 
chase it. That fall he built a house and com- 
menced breaking the land. He tiled it the 
next spring and continued the work of im- 
provement and cultivation until he had one 
of the best farms of its size in the locality, 
raising as nuich on it, b)' working it thor- 
oughly, as many did who owned twice the 
number of acres. At the age of sixteen he 
commenced rutming a threshing machine, 
which he operated thirteen years, and this 



helped him out considerably in paying for 
his lands which was soon free from debt; 
He was one of the youngest threshers in the 
county and made a success of the business.' 
He continued to carry on his farm until 
1893. when he sold it for ninety-tive dollars 
per acre, having paid forty dollars for it. 
Mr. Capes then moved to Pontiac, where 
he was engaged in different lines of trade 
for a time, including the implement and milk 
business. In Jul\-, 1895, he turned his 
attention to the ice business. At that 
time there were two tirms of the kind 
in the city ; one of these he got his 
brother to bu)', while he purchased the 
other and then, buying his brother's business, 
he had entire control of the ice trade. His 
ice houses were located on the Vermilion 
ri\er near the Wabash Railroad, where he 
owns two acres of land, (jn which are six 
houses, with a storage capacity of eight 
thousand tons. He puts up a full supply 
and gives employment to many men in cut- 
ting the ice. During the summer he runs 
iour teams and employs nine men in its dis- 
tribution to his customers, and for the past 
three years has controlled the ice trade of 
tlie cit)- and done a good business. He has 
a fine property on the south side of the river, 
opposite the Chautauciua grounds and ex- 
tending to the river. Here he has a nice 
home where he can enjoy the results of his 
labor. He belongs to that class of men 
whom the world terms self-made, for, com- 
mencing life empty handed, he has con- 
quered the obstacles in the path to success, 
and has not only secured a comfortable com- 
petence, but by his efforts has materially 
advanced the interests of the community 
with which he is associated. Politically, he 
is identified with the Republican party and 
fraternally affiliated with the Knights of 



152 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Pythias. Modern Woodmen of America, 
Royal Neighbors and Toilers Fraternity. He 
attends and aids in the support of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which his 
wife is a member. 



SAMUEL J. PRISK. 

Samuel J. P'risk. a well-known nursery 
man and highly respected citizen of Pontiac. 
who has made his home in this county for 
the past eighteen years, was born in Corn- 
wall, England, December 20, 1836, a son of 
Samuel and Grace (Williams) Prisk, na- 
tives of the same place, where the father 
engaged in mining until his emigration to 
America in 1840. The grandfather, Joseph 
Prisk, had previously crossed the Atlantic 
and located on a branch of the East Fork 
river, four miles southeast of Galena, erect- 
ing one of the pioneer homes of that lo- 
cality. With his two sons, William and 
Paul, he built the first ?\Iethodist Episcopal 
church east of Galena, a log structure, also 
laid out a cemetery and a mound there, which 
is still known as Joseph Prisk mound. He 
owned and operated a farm of forty acres 
and also engaged in mining. He was a 
very active member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and his home became the stop- 
ping place for all the ministers. The fa- 
ther of our .subject bought a farm of eighty 
acres between Scales Mound and Council 
Hill, Jo Daviess county, and built 'the first 
stone house in that part of the country, it 
being also the first good house. During the 
construction of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road through that locality be boarded the 
hands, and throughout his active business 
life engaged in farming and mining. He 



finally sold his farm and bought a two-hun- 
dred-and-twenty-acre farm on Rush creek in 
Woodbine township, living on it unt'l his 
death, which occurred in July, 1861. His 
wife died June 14. 189J. at the ripe old age 
of seventy-seven years. Both were earnest 
and consistent members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

At a very early age our subject began 
work, and all the education he acquired was 
obtained at Sunday school, which he at- 
tended about three hours every Sunday, but 
Ijy reading and observation in later vears 
he has become a man of broad practical 
knowledge. He worked with bis father in 
the lead mines from the age of eight years 
until he attained his majority, when he 
started out in life for liimself. Going to La 
Salle, he found em])loyment in the coal 
mines, where he worked fifteen years. 

There Mr. Prisk was married, December 
31, 1859, to Miss Mary Ann Case, who was 
born in Preble county, Ohio, in 1843. Her 
father, Conrad Case, was a native of Penn- 
sylvania and went to Preble county, Ohio, 
when a young man, locating eighteen miles 
from Dayton, where he married Sarah Ann 
Combs. He engaged in farming there until 
1854, when he came to Illinois and settled at 
Jericho, near Aurora, where he followed 
the same occupation two or three years. His 
next home was four miles from De Witt, 
Iowa, where he located when the country 
was all wild and unimproved, but he bought 
land, built a house and engaged in the cul- 
tivation of his farm for three years, at the 
end of which time he sold out and returned 
to Illinois, this time locating in La Salle, 
but his last days were spent in Ohio, where 
he died in 1863. His wife had died in Jeri- 
cho, Illinois. Both were members of the 
Lutheran church. He was a cooper by trade. 



i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



"53 



Mr. and Mrs. Prisk have eight children 
hving, while Mary Jane, wife of Albert Ber- 
nell, of Streator, died at the age of twenty- 
four year.s. Allen, a re.-;ident of Poiitiac, 
married Maggie Lampkin and has four chil- 
dren, Robert. Marguerite. Allen and Levi. 
William J- is now living in Springfield. 
Samuel, a resident of Pontiac, married Ida 
Block, and has four children. May, Lloyd 
Lincoln, Lillian and Dewey, Lillie is at 
home. Mrs. Estella McGill has one child. 
Pearl, and lives with her parents. Wesley 
married Emma Laycock, now decea.sed, and 
is serving as corpciral of Company H, Thir- 
ty-ninth United States Volunteer Infantry, 
in the Philippines. Clara and May are both 
at home. 

After President Lincoln's first call for 
seventy-five thousand men at the opening 
of the Civil war, Mr. Prisk was the eight- 
eenth to enroll his name among the volir 
teers at La Salle, and was a member of the 
first company to leave that place, it being 
Comj)any K, Eleventh Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry. They went to Springfield, Illinois. 
April 20, 1 86 1, and from there proceedeil 
to Villa Ridge, near Cairo, where they were 
detailed to guard a bridge. They were next 
ordered to Bridge Point, Missouri, and when 
their term of enlistment expired were honor- 
ably discharged. 

Returning to La Salle. Mr. Prisk en- 
gaged in mining and farming there for some 
time and then devoted four years to the latter 
inirsuit at Rush creek, Jo Daviess count}', 
after which he returned to La Salle, where 
he again followed farming. Sul)sequently 
he engaged in mining at Streator until com- 
ing to Livingston county in 1882, when he 
U-cated northwest of Pontiac and engaged 
in agricultural pursuits until 1889, in the 
meantime serving as roadmaster two years. 



He then came to Pontiac and has since de- 
voted his attention to the nursery business, 
becoming one of the best known and most 
successful nursery men of this section. In 
1895 he built a fine home at No. 117 Park 
street, facing River \'iew Park. He was 
the first to build on that street and the peo- 
ple laughed at him for going so far out, but 
it is now well built up and is one of the most 
pleasant parts of the city, being advan- 
tageously located near the park and river. 
Mr. Prisk has charge of the park, in which 
the Chautauqua Association is held. He 
is a member of T. Lyle Dickey Post, No. 
105, G. A. R., of which he is now officer 
of the guard, and both he and his wife are 
active and faithful members of the Methodist 
Lpisco])al church, in which he has served as 
steward, class leader and suijcrintendent of 
the Sundav school. 



JOHN C. TAYLOR. 

John C. Taylor, who resides on section 
36, Pontiac township, Livingston county, is 
the owner of a fine farm of two hundred 
and thirty-six acres, within three and a half 
miles of the city of Pontiac. He is a na- 
tive of Saratoga county. New York, born 
near the great Saratoga springs October 5. 
1843, and is a son of George C. Taylor, a 
native of the West Indies, born on the island 
of St. Bartholomew January 30, 181 7. The 
grandfather, George W. Taylor, was a pro- 
fessional sailor and followed the sea for 
many years, but later settled in Saratoga 
county. New York, where his last days were 
spent. George C. Taylor was reared in Sar- 
atoga county and there married Miss Uretta 
Bentley, a native of Saratoga county and 



'54 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a daughter of Otis Bentley. one of the pin- 
neers of Saratoga count}-, who lived to the 
remarkable old age of ninety-nine years and 
six months, and whose faculties were pre- 
served to tlie last. He continued to vote 
at every election until within one month of 
his death, voting at an election in March and 
dying the next April. He never wore glasses 
and could see to read until near the last. 

In Saratoga county George C. Taylor 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until his 
removal to Livingston county in 1858. Here 
he purchased an undivided half of a half- 
section of land which had !:>een entered by his 
brother. John J. Taylor, and which had been 
partially improxed. In partnership with his 
brother he commenced the further improve- 
ment of the place and in due time had one of 
the best farms in the township. He later 
jxirchased the interest of his brother in the 
half-section and continued to li\'e on that 
homestead until his death. Decemlier 9. 1893, 
' at the age of seventy-six years. He was 
twice married, liis^ first \\ife d}-ing ]\Iarch 
8, 1877. The second wife is )-et living. By 
the first wife three sons were born. Otis B. 
was a soldier in the Civil war and died in 
1862, at Buck's Lodge, Tennessee, while in 
the service. John C, of this review, was the 
second in order of birth. George W. died 
at the ag-e of twenty-one years. He died 
in Saratoga county and at his death was 
just the same age as his brother when he 
died. 

John C. Taylor came to Livingston coun- 
ty in his fifteenth )-ear. His educatit)n, 
which was begun in the common schools of 
his native state, was completed in the com- 
mon schools of Livingston county. While 
he gave the greater portion of his time in 
assisting his father with the farm work, 
he spent a short time in teaching in the dis- 



trict schools, in which line he met with a 
reasonable degree of success. He was first 
married, April 22, 1866, to Miss Cecelia 
Zeph, a native of W'urtemberg, Germany, 
but who came to this country in early life 
and was reared to womanhood in Livingston 
county. By this union were three children, 
as follows : Hattie, now the wife of Grant 
McCormack, of Livingston county; Zephyr, 
wife of Lincoln Tuttle, of Graymont, Illi- 
nois : and \Villiam, who married Daisy 
I'earre, and now resides in Arkansas, where 
he is engaged in farming. 

After his marriage Mr. Taylor continued 
tc operate the home farm, on which he made 
many improvements, including the erection 
of a large barn. For some years he engaged 
quite extensively in the stock business, in 
which he met with good success. His wife 
died in 1872 and October i, 1873, '''^ mar- 
ried Miss Eliza McManis, a native of Ohio 
and daughter of Joseph McManis, who was 
born in Pennsylvania, but who removed to 
Ohio and later to Illinois. He was married 
three times and was the father of nineteen 
children, sixteen of whom grew to mature 
years. Mrs. Taylor was mostly reared in 
Livingston county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Taylor ha\-e five children : 
George, who is assisting in the cultivation 
of the home farm ; John, a teacher in St. 
Alban Academy, Knoxville, Illinois; Ar- 
thur G., a student at Zion College, Chicago; 
-Mice, a student in the Pontiac high school; 
and Harry, in the home school. 

Politically Mr. Taylor was originally a 
Republican and supported the men and meas- 
ures of that party for many years. Of late 
he has given his support to the Prohibition 
jiarty. He never sought or desired public 
office and declined several that were offered 
him ; however, he served for a time as a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



155 



nieniljer of tlie scIkidI Ixianl and as president 
of his school district. Reared a Baptist, lie 
lias since undergone a cliange of faith and is 
now a member of the Christian CatlioHc 
ciiurch in Zion, of whicli body liis wife is 
also a member. As a citizen lie has always 
enjoyed the resided and confidence of those 
l.v whom he is surrounded and by those who 
know him best. 



WILLI. \.M II. P,K.\CK. 

William II. I'race. who is now success- 
fully engaged in the milk business in Ponti- 
ac, Illinois, was born in Baldwinsville. Xew 
York. February 21, 1845. a son of Moses 
and Frances (Sibbelds) Brace, also natives 
of the Empire state. His paternal grand- 
father. Benjamin Brace, was born in Eng- 
land and on his emigration to this countr\- 
settled in Baldwins\ille. \\ hen our subject 
was eight years old his father remove<l to 
Chicago and shortly afterward located in 
Will county. Illinois, where he engaged in 
farming throughout the remainder of his 
life. 

William II. Brace was reared on the 
home fartii in Manhattan townshiij, \\ ill 
county, and was educated in the local schools. 
In .\ugust, i86j. he enlisted in Company 
E, One Hundredth Illinois X'olunteer Infan- 
try, being one of the youngest to serve for 
three years as a regular soldier. His regi- 
ment, which was assigned to the Army of 
the Cumberland, went first to Louisville and 
spent some time in Kentucky following 
Bragg's army. Mr. Brace's first battle was 
that of Perryville, followed by the engage- 
ments at Stone River, Nashville and Chick- 
amauga. He i)articipatecl in the siege of 
.\tlanta and went with Sherman on the 



march to the sea. He was mustered out at 
Chicago in .\ugu.st, 1865. At Chickamauga 
he received two fiesh wounds, but was never 
seriously injured. 

While home on a furlough, in 1864; Mr. 
Brace married Miss Adeline Mosscnv, of 
Manhattan, Illinois, who came here fnmi 
Xew ^'ork. .\fter the war our subject en- 
gaged in farming in Will county on his own 
account for two years, and then went to 
Chicago, where he had charge of the team- 
ing business of .\. II. Andrews & Company 
for eight years. On leaving there he came 
to Chatsworth, Livingston county, where he 
followed farrming one year, and engaged in 
the same pursuit in Eppards Point township, 
successfully operating a farm of one hundred 
and si.xty accres for eight years. On sell- 
ing out, he mo\ed to Pontiac and bought 
thirteen lots on West Washington street, 
where he has a nice home surrounded by a 
beautiful lawn. He also has a house and lot 
elsewhere. For four years, under Dr. 
Scouller, he held the position of night of^ 
ficer at the reform school, having charge of 
a dormitory, but on account of ill health he 
was obliged to resign, and after a six-months' 
rest he became night police in I'oniiac, serv- 
ing as such for ten years with credit to him- 
self and satisfaction of all concerned, being 
one of the best-known and most highly-re- 
spected ofificials the city has e\er had. lie 
resigned that position in 1898 and embarked 
in the dairy business, keeping cows and sell- 
ing his own milk, but on account of his wife's 
health he sold his dairy, though he still re- 
tains his milk route, which is the largest in 
the city. He is a good business man, being 
energetic and nrogressive, and has met with 
success in this undertaking. 

Mr. Brace lost his first wife May 30^ 
1894. and on the 7th of October, i8g6, he 



156 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



married Miss Lizzie Krell, of Pontiac, a 
daughter of John Krell, of Havana, Illinois. 
In his political views he is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and while living in the county served 
as deputy under three different sheriffs. 
Fraternallv he is a member of T. Lyle 
Dickey Post, G. A. R. A pleasant, genial 
gentleman, he makes friends and is held in 
high regard by all who know him. 



PETER BAUMAN. 

Peter Bauman, one of the representative 
German-American citizens of Livingston 
county and a prosperous farmer, residing on 
section 26, Pike township, two miles from 
Chenoa, was born in Luxemburg, Germany, 
April 30, 1834, and there grew to manhood. 
He had good educational advantages, at- 
tending school eight years, becoming familiar 
with the German language, but his knowl- 
edge of English has been acquired through 
his own unaided efforts since coming to the 
new world. In 1854 he was one of the pas- 
sengers on a sailing vessel, which left the 
harbor of Havre, France, and arrived in 
New York after twenty-eight days spent upon 
tlie water, which was considered a quick 
trip at that time. He proceeded at once to 
Chicago, joining his brother, Michael Bau- 
man, who had located in Illinois in 1849. 

Our subject found emploment on a farm 
in ^\'oodford county, working by the month 
several years there and in Marshall county. 
His first purchase of land was a partially im- 
proved farm of one hundred acres in the lat- 
ter county, on which was standing a small 
house, and there he made his home for sev- 
eral years. In 1888 he bought the farm of 
one hundred and si.xtv acres on section 26, 



Pike township, Livingston county, where he 
now resides, and to its further improvement 
and development he has since devoted his 
time and attention, success attending his well- 
directed efforts. 

While a resident of Woodford county, 
Mr. Bauman was married, in January, 1861, 
to Miss Helen Balbach, who was born and 
reared in Bavaria, Germany, and is a daugh- 
ter of August and Anna Elizabeth (Keeler) 
Balbach. The mother died in that country, 
and in 1854, the father, with his three daugh- 
ters and one son, came to America, joining 
his older son, Jacob Balback, who had been 
a resident of W'oodford county, Illinois, since 
1852, and who is now a merchant of Chenoa. 
The other son, Paul Balbach, is a farmer of 
Pike township, Livingston county. The fa- 
ther died in Woodford county, in 1856. Mr 
and Mrs. Bauman have a family of eight 
children, namely: ]\Iar\-. wife of Chris 
Pfeffinger, of Waldo township, Livingston 
county; Lizzie, at home; Effie, widow of 
Alaxander Black, and a resident of Wood- 
ford county ; Peter, who is married and lives 
in Pekin, Illinois; Lena, Anna and Clara, all 
at home. The last named was educated at 
Chenoa and the normal college at Valpar- 
aiso, Indiana, and is now one of the success- 
ful teachers of Livingston county. 

Politically Mr.- Bauman is a stanch Dem- 
ocrat, and cast his first presidential ballot 
for Stephen A. Douglas, in i860. He has 
never cared for public office, but has pre- 
ferred to devote his undivided time and at- 
tention to his business interests. His life 
has been one of industry and due success has 
not been denied him. His honorable, upright 
course commends him to the confidence and 
respect of all, and he is well worthy of rep- 
resentation in the history of his atlopted 
countv. 



J 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



"57 



W ILLIA.M I. St. JOHX. 

\\'illiam I. St. Juliii. an lionored veteran 
of the Civil war. \\ Iki is ncnv living a retired 
life in Pontiac, was horn in \\ arren connty, 
Indiana, July 20, 1844, a son of Samuel and 
Margaret (Coldren) St. John, both of whom 
were horn in Ohio, the latter near Zanesville, 
but were married in Indiana, where the fa- 
ther located when a young man, and where 
he engaged in farming until coming to Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois, about 1853. He 
settled near Ocoya, in Eppards Point town- 
ship, where he purchased one hundred and 
si.xty acres of unimproved land. That lo- 
cality was then all wild, there being but four 
houses scattered through the timber, and his 
nearest neighbor was some ilistance away. 
He devoted his time and attention to the im- 
])rovement and cultivation of that farm until 
1866, when he rented it and moved to 
Chenoa, where he worked at wagonmaking 
until called to his final rest. He was one 
of the early members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church in this county, and was a Re- 
j)ul)lican in jjolitics. 

IJefore k'a\ing Indiana, \\'illiam I. St. 
John attended school a term or two. but there 
was no school hou.se in his district when the 
family came to Illinois, and he was well 
grown before a school which he could at- 
tend was built. His educational advantages 
were therefore limited, but he has become 
a well informed ni.ui by reading and ob- 
ser\ation in later years. He remained on 
the home farm until after the Ci\il war broke 
out, when he enlisted, August 6, i86j, in 
Company (i. One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The regi- 
ment spent much time in Louisville, hut par- 
ticipated in the engagements at Frankfort, 
Crab Orchard and Bowling Green, and did 



garrison duty at Mitchellville, Tunnel Hill 
and Gallatin, Tennessee. From there they 
went to Nash\-ille and participated in the bat- 
ties of Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge, 
being on the march most of the time during 
that campaign. They were also with Sher- 
man on his celebrated march to the sea, and 
at Peach Tree Creek, in front of .\tlanta, 
Mr. St. John was wounded He was sent to 
the hospital at Chattanooga, was later trans- 
ferred to Xashville, and from there was sent 
home. At the end of three months he was 
able to rejoin his regiment in time to take 
part in the Carolina campaign. He was in 
the battle of Goldsl)oro, and was at Raleigh 
when lobnston surrendered. He then 
marched to Washington. D. C, and partici- 
pated in the grand review, after which he was 
mustered out at that place and discharged at 
Chicago, after almost three years of faithful 
service on .southern battle fields. 

Returning to his home, i\Ir. St. John 
engaged in farm work one year, and then 
went to Chenoa, where he worked at the 
carpenter's trade four years. On the fjth of 
September. 1866, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Amelia Stone, a daughter of Will- 
iam Stone, a farmer of Ohio. By this union 
were born two children : William Seth, who 
now operates his father's farm, married 
Minnie Talbot and has four children : Mabel, 
Roy, Bert and an infant. Burton G. is a 
resident of I'ontiac. 

On leaving Chcn(}a Mr. St. John pur- 
chased a farm of forty acres in Ejjpards 
Point township, which he sold three years 
later and boughtfi fifty acres of land in .\mity 
township, but this he disposed of a year later 
and bought an eighty-acre tract in the same 
township, where he successfully engaged 
in farming for twelve years. At the end of 
tha ttime he traded it for a farm of two hun- 



TSi 



THE • BIOGRAPHICAlL RECORD. 



dred and thirty-fi\e acres in Amity town- 
ship, which lie has greatly improved and 
still owns. In 1880. he- moved to Pontiac 
and bought property at No. 2 1 1 South Ver- 
milion street, where he has a large and nicely 
kept place. Here he worked at the carpen- 
ter's trade for a time, but is now living re- 
tired, enjoying a well-earned rest, tree from 
the cares arid responsibilities of business life. 
Religiously both he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he 
'also belongs to T. Lyle Dickey Post, G. A. 
R., of which he is junior vice commander. 
He has always been a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party and its principles, and he 
has ever been a loyal citizen, co-operating 
in all that is calculated to promote the inter- 
ests of his state or nation, his patriotism 
being manifest in times of peace as well as 
in war. 



BEXNET HL'MISTOX. 

Bennet Humistcjn. deceased, was one of 
the leading business men of Pontiac, Illi- 
nois, who in his successful career showed 
that he had the ability to plan wisely and 
execute with energy, a combination which, 
when possessed by men in any walk of life, 
never fails to effect notable results. 

Mr. Humiston was born in I'lyniouth 
Hollow, Connecticut, September 6, 1830. a 
son of Bennet and Emily ( Warner) Humis- 
ton, representatives of old and honored fam- 
ilies of that state. On attaining to man's 
estate the father started out in life for him- 
self as a peddlet, traveli'ig tiirough the 
south for many years, but after his marriage 
he settled on a farm in Plymouth and de- 
\()ted the remainder of his life to agricult- 
ural ]jursuits. 



Our subject grew to manhootl on the 
home farm and was provided with better 
educational- privileges than most farmer 
boysi attending school at Warren, Litchfield 
county, Connecticut, for two years. He then 
followed farming in his native state until 
the fall of 1852, when he came west with 
Apollos Camp, and together they took up 
a section of land in Esmen township, Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois. May 22. 1856. he 
married his partner's daughter. Miss Harriet 
Camp, and they made their home on his half- 
section of land until 1876. In the mean- 
time he erected good and substantial build- 
ings thereon and placed the land under a 
high state of cultivation. He introduced 
some of the first fine horses into the countv 
and at the time of his death, which occurred 
Xo\-eml)er 15. 1883. '^^ '''^'' ""^ hundred 
heatl. He and Mr. Cam]) were always in 
business together and owned in the neigh- 
borhood of two thousand acres of \'aluahle 
land. The}- expended larse anmunts in til- 
ing and con\erting their land into highl_\- 
productive tracts. They were among the 
original stockholders of the Pontiac Xa- 
tional Bank, of Pontiac, of which Mr, Camp 
was also a director. In his political views 
Mr. Hinniston was a Democrat. He was a 
member of the Masonic fraternit}- anil a 
Uian of high standing in the community. 
Of keen perceptit)n. of unbounded enterprise, 
his success in life was due to his own well-di- 
rected efforts, and he deserves jjrominent 
mention among the leading and representa- 
ti\e business men of the coimt\'. 

Since her husband's death Mrs. Humis- 
ton has successfully carried on the vast es- 
tate, and has displayed most excellent busi- 
ness and executive ability in its management. 
She was one of the heavy original stock- 
holders of the Pontiac State Bank, and from 




BENNET HUMISTON. 



THE BIOGiiAPHICAL RECORD. 



i6i 



its i_)rganization has been a director. She 
t.wns a good deal of property in Pt)ntiac. 
also in Odell. Illinois, and Eldorado. Mis- 
souri, wliere she has a business block. She 
has been a liberal donator to the public li- 
brarv of Pontiac and other charitable insti- 
tiitions. and never witliholds her liberal sun- 
port from any enterprise which she Ijeheves 
will i)rove of benefit to the community. In 
1876 Mr. Humiston built a lieautiful resi- 
<lence on North Main street. Pontiac. which 
is still owned and occupied by his widow. 
I: occupies a whcjle block on the hill and is 
one of the most attractive places in the city. 
Over this home Mrs. Humiston presides 
with fjiacious dignity and its hospitable 
<loors are ever open for tlie reception of lier 
manv friends. 



JOHN T. ARMSTROXC;. 

The subject of this personal narrative is 
one of the most successful and prosperous 
farmers of Eppards Point township.hishome 
being on section 16, five miles .south of Pon- 
tiac. He has made his special field of in- 
dustry an eminent success, and is highly re- 
spected and esteemed by those who know 
him. 

Mr. Armstrong was born in Madiscjn. 
Ohio. April 28. 1839. and there grew to man- 
hood, receiving a common-school education. 
In April. 1864. during the dark days of the 
Civil war, he enlisted in the one-hundred-day 
service, as a private in Company C, One 
Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio National 
Guards. The regiment went to Virginia and 
took jiart in the battle of New Creek and 
several skirmishes, but only one man died 
in the service, his death occurring in a hos- 
pital. On the expiration of his term of en- 



listment. Mr. Arnistrong was honorably dis- 
charged at Camp Dennison, in August. 1864, 
and returned to his Ohio liome. 

Jn. the spring of 1865 he came to Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois, and located upon lus 
present farm in Ei)pards Point township, 
purchasing four hundred acres, about half 
of which had been broken and a small house 
erected thereon. He has since purchased 
more land, and to the further improvement 
and cultivation of his place he has devoted 
his energies with most gratifying results, so 
that he now has one of the best farms in the 
township. In connection with general farm- 
ing he is engaged in feeding and dealing in 
slock, and in this branch of his business he 
has also prospered. 

Returning to his old home in Madison 
county. Ohio, in March. 1869. Mr. Arm- 
trong married Lydia Cousins, who was 
born in Pickaway, that state, but was reared 
in the same neighborhood as her husband 
and educated in the same .school. They 
became the parents of six children, but only 
three are now living ;.\rchic ]•... a pharmacist 
of Dwight: Lida W. and (irant C, both at 
iinine. Bernard C. and jolm Ixith died in 
childhood, and Sarah L.. wife of O. I. Ellis, 
died in Ancona. Illinois, at the age of twenty- 
two years, leaving two children. (). 1. and 
Sadie Ellis. 

Mr. .Xrmstrong cast his first presidential 
vote for .\hraham Lincoln, in i860, and has 
since been an ardent Republican. Although 
he has never sought i)olitical preferment, he 
was elected and served three years as high- 
way commissioner and was a member of the 
school hoard f(jr a number of years, during 
which time he did all in his power to secure 
competent teachers and advance the educa- 
tional interests of his community. Relig- 
iouslv. both he and his wife are active mem- 



1 62 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



bers of tlie Centre Methodist Episcopal 
churcli and they give their support to every 
worthy enterprise which they lieheve calcu- 
lated to advance the moral, social or material 
welfare of the township and county in which 
thev live. 



JARVIS C. SUMXER. 

Jarvis C. Sumner, one of the l)est known 
citizens of Pontiac, was born in Elkhart, In- 
diana, November 7, 1843. '^ *'"! '^f John M. 
and Ann (Strong) Sumner. The father 
was born in New York, March 3, 181 2, and 
was a son of Harvey and Sally (Sherwin) 
Sumner, who were born, reared and married 
in \''ermont. The latter was a daughter of 
Ahamaz Sherwin, a drum major from \'er- 
niont in the Revolutionary war. At an early 
day Harvey Sumner and wife moved to 
Westport township, Essex C(junty, New 
York, and in 181 8 went to Ohio, .sailing out 
of BufYalo on the first steajner that ever navi- 
gated the great lakes. They located four 
miles east of Cleveland, where Mr. Sumner 
followed farming for some time, but spent 
his last days in Elkhart, Indiana. His wife 
died in Cleveland about 1825. 

John M. Sumner, father of our subject, 
accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Oiiio, and later went with his father to Elk- 
hart, Indiana, in the fall of 1834, when that 
place contained but few inhabitants. On his 
arrival there he had but six and one-fourth 
cents, but he soon found employment and 
the next summer was able to purchase forty 
acres of land. ^ There he married Ann Strong, 
a daughter of Walter Strong, who went to 
Indiana from Ohio, but was born in Con- 
necticut. He gave his daughter forty acres 
of land, and upon that place Mr. and Mrs. 



Sumner lived until 1850, when they moved 
to Wisconsin, but a year later returned to 
Indiana, He followed farming throughout 
the greater part of his active business life, 
but is now living retired with our subject. 
The wife and mother, who was a member 
of the Universalist church, died November 
24, 1886. 

Our subject acquired his education in the 
common and high schools of Elkhart, and 
assisted his father in the operation of the 
home farm until twenty-one years of age. 
He manifested his patriotism by enlisting in 
the Civil war, but was discharged on account 
of illness and sent home before leavinv the 
state. He was a member of the Chandler 
Horse Guards of Coldwater. 

In 1864 Mr. Sumner moved to Eureka, 
Illinois, where he engaged in farming on his 
own account. Prior to his removal, he was 
married, in Cass county, Michigan, to Miss 
Sarah ■Martin, who was born in Elkhart 
county, Indiana, February 6, 1846, a daugh- 
ter of A\'illiam and Mary .A. (^Clinger) 
Martin, nati\es of Ohio, whose home was 
five miles east of Middlebury, in La Grange 
county, Indiana. The mother died when 
Mrs. Sumner was only two years old, and the 
father departed this life at Benton Harbor, 
^Michigan, September 27, 1872. ]\Ir. and 
Airs. Sumner have three children, namely : 
Charles M., May Belle and William Roy. 
The last named was a member of the state 
militia, but was not accepted into the United 
States service during our recent war with 
Spain. 

\\'hile at Eureka, Mr. Sumner served as 
constable and deputy sheriff under Frank 
Roman and Garman Gish for eight years. 
He attended to all the sherifif's business in 
his part of the county and served all the pa- 
pers in the Workman murder case. He also 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



163 



carried on the largest and most imjxsrtant 
livery business in the town. He finally sold 
out and moved to Livingston county, in 
tiie spring of 1881. For two years he was 
engaged in farming in Pontiac township, 
and then mo\ed to the city of Pontiac that 
lie might provide his children with better 
educational advantages, but was mostly en- 
gaged in farming and teaming until ap- 
jK)inted deputy by Sheriff Reed. He was re- 
appointed by SheritY Talbot and most cred- 
itably and satisfactorily filled that jMsition 
for seven years. He did a good deal of work 
in connection witii the bank robbery case 
of Cornell and the Rightsel murder case of 
Fairbury, besides a large amount of civil 
business and collecting. In November, 
1896, he was elected constable, and is still 
filling that office in a most capable manner. 
He also has considerable property in his 
Jiands to rent, and does a good life insurance 
business. He owns a lovely home situated 
on a large lot at the corner i>f Plum and , 
Cleary streets, surrounded 1)y Iteautiful trees 
and shrubs and is one of the l)est kept 
places of the city. Since attaining his ma- 
jority Mr. Sumner has affiliated with the 
Republican party, and both he and his wife 
are members of the Presbvterian church. 



WTLLI.VM H. KFiTCH.X.M. 

One of the lousiest, most energetic and 
most enterprising men of Dwight, Illinois, 
ii the subject of this sketch, w ho is success- 
fully engaged in the real estate and loan busi- 
ness, as well as the practice of law. He was 
born in that place, February 9, 1861, and 
there the greater part of iiis life has been 



spent — an important facti>r in business and 
])ublic affairs. 

William H. Ketchani. Sr., father of our 
subject, was born in Fishkill. Dutchess coun- 
ty. New ^'ork, November 28, 1821. He re- 
ceived a good English education and re- 
mained at home until 1852, when he set sail 
for California, leaving New York, February 
4, and arriving in San Francisco Auril i. 
He was shi])wrecked ofY the coast of Mexico 
and delayed five weeks. He was success- 
fully engaged in mining about three years 
and a half near Marys ville, and then returned 
to his native state by way of the Isthmus of 
P'anama. In Dutchess county, he was mar- 
ried, November 30, 1840, to Miss Mary E. 
Losee, who was born there May 2^, 1822,. 
and was a daughter of John Losee, whose 
ancestry can be traced back to \\'ilbur Weber, 
King of Holland and a son of the Prince of 
Orange. His daughter, Anna Kanjanse 
\\ eber, married Everetus Bogardus, the first 
])reacher who came to New York Cit\'. Mrs. 
Ketcham was the se\'enth generation from 
this king, wlio left an immense fortune, now 
amounting to ajjout five million dollars, and, 
which is in litigation at present. In the fall 
of 1855, shortly after his return to New 
York from California, Mr. Ketcham mi- 
grated to Dwight, Illinois, which place then 
contained only eight families. Here he at 
first worked at anything he could find to do, 
and for a time engaged in farming and op- 
erated a corn sheller a number of years. He 
was a public-spirited man and did much to 
advance the interests of his adopted town, 
taking ([uite an active part in public affairs, 
and serving as justice of the peace fourteen 
}ears. school director a number of years, 
and also village trustee some time, and dep- 
uty sheriff of the county in early days. In 
1874 he joined Dwight Lodge, No. 513, 



•164 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



I. O. O. F., and later became a member of 
Pacific Encampment, No. 126. He died, 
April 19, 1882. 

The subject of this sketch is the young- 
est in a family of seven children, the others 
being as follows: Berwin L., the eldest, died 
in infancy. John L., a member of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-ninth Infantry, was 
wounded in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, 
and died in the hospital at Chattanooga, June 
25, 1864. Jane E. married J. J. Smith and 
both are now deceased. Frank is the wife 
of Hugh Thompson, of Poatiac. Mary H. is 
the wife of George Hoover, of Chicago. 
Emma Y. is the widow of W. A. Chamberl- 
lain and resides with her children, Marietta 
and Frank William, who live in Chicago. 

William H. Ketcham, Jr., was reared and 
educated in Dwight, and began his business 
career as bookkeeper in the grain elevator 
of Hugh Thompson, of that place, remain- 
ng with him one year. He then became in- 
terested in the stock business, which he car- 
ried on alone for one year, buying cattle in 
Livingston and Grundy counties. .\t the 
end of that time he formed a partnership 
with John Thompson in the same business, 
shipping stock to the Chicago market. This 
connection lasted two years, and Mr. Ketch- 
am ne.xt purchased the real estate business 
of Alexander McKay, which he conducted 
from December, 1886, until April, 1887, 
when he sold out to Hetzel & Romberger. 

After disposing of his real estate busi- 
ness, Mr. Ketcham moved to Marion county, 
Kansas, where he was interested in the same 
pursuit until the fall of 1887, when he en- 
tered the law office of Kellar & Dean, study- 
ing under their instruction and at the same 
time doing office work. Before his admis- 
sion to the bar he drew up the papers for 
twenty-one forclosures in one week. He 



v.as admitted to practice by examination be- 
fore Judge Doster, the present chief justice 
of the state of Kansas, August 20, 1888, 
and before the supreme court at Topeka, 
June 2, 1891. He was associated in prac- 
tice with W. H. Carpenter, of Marion, Kan- 
sas, from 1889 to July, 1891, when he re- 
turned to Dwight and resumed business as 
a real estate dealer, in partnership with Frank 
1. Smith, under the firm name of Ketcham 
& Smith. On the 23d of March, 1892, he 
was admitted to practice in lUinois, and later 
in the state of Indiana. By mutual agree- 
ment the partnership between Mr. Ketcham 
and Mr. Smith was dissolved in October, 
1895, since which time our subject has been 
alone in business. He gi\'es the greater part 
of his attention to real estate, but is also en- 
gaged in the practice of law in the courts of 
this state and Indiana. He carried the 
Clauson case through the supreme court of 
Illinois. 

On the 19th of .April, 1893, Mr. Ketcham 
was united in marriage with Miss Nora A. 
Taylor, a native of Grundy county, Illinois, 
and one of a family of four daughters, all 
living. Her father, G. L. Taylor, was one 
of the first settlers of Grundy county, but 
is now a resident of Dwight township, Liv- 
ingston county. Mr. and Mrs. Ketcham 
have three children, namely : Mary Emma, 
Gertrude Nora and Nellie Maurine. 

Fraternally, Mr. Ketcham is a member 
of Dwight Lodge, No. 513, and Pacific En- 
campment, No. 313. I. O. O. F., and Liv- 
ingston Lodge, No. 371, F. & A. M. Since 
reaching his majority he has always affil- 
iated with the Democratic party and taken 
an active interest in politics. He is now an 
advocate of the free coinage of silver, and in 
1896 took the stump, speaking in Chicago 
and other parts of the state. \Mule engaged 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



165 



in the i)ractice of law in Kansas lie assisted 
tiie county attorney and during liis residence 
in Dwight has taken an active part in puhlic 
affairs. He was elected mayor in 1896 and 
efficiently tilled the office one term, during 
which time the park ordinance was passed 
and Udtahle improvements made. He was 
once a candidate hefore the Democratic con- 
vention, f<ir judge on the Democratic ticket, 
but was defeated. In 1886 he was elected 
village treasurer and was filling that office 
when he moved to Kansas, and in April, 
1900, was elected village trustee, in which 
capacity lie is now serving in a most credit- 
able and satisfactory manner. A man of 
keen perception, of unbounded enterprise, his 
success in life is due to his own efforts, and 
he deserves prominent mention among the 
leading representative business men of the 
county. His genial, pleasing manner makes 
him quite popular in both business and social 
circles, and as a pul)lic-si)irited, enterpris- 
ing man he is recognized as a valued citizen 
of the communitv. 



JOHN R. OUGHTOX. 

To the ])rcscnt mayor of Dwight. Hon. 
John R. (Jughton. the city owes a deep 
debt of gratitude, for through many years 
he has been an important factor in its prog- 
ress and ad\ancement along social, educa- 
tional, material and moral lines. His active 
co-operation has been given to every move- 
ment for the public good, and his support has 
been withheld from no movement calculated 
to advance the general welfare. His aid, 
too, has been of a practical nature and the 
substantial growth of the city is the out- 
come of his well-directed and discriminat- 
ing effort. 



It is not an easy task to descrilje ade- 
<|uately a man w ho has lead an eminently act- 
ive and busy life and who has attained to a 
position of high relative distinction in the 
more important and exacting fields of human 
endeavor. But biography finds its most 
perfect justification, nevertheless, in the 
tracing and recording of such a life historv. 
It is, then, witii a full a])])reciation of all 
that is demanded, and oi the painstaking 
scrutiny that must be accorded each state- 
ment, and yet witli a feeling of significant 
satisfaction, that the writer essays the task 
of touchinbg brietly upon the details of such 
a record as has ben the voice of the char- 
acter of the hoiKired sulijcct whose life no\v' 
comes under review. 

John R. Ougluoii was burn in County 
Tip])erary, Ireland, in 1857. and resided in 
his iiati\e land until sixteen _\ears of age, 
when he crossed the Atlantic U) America, lo- 
cating in Chicago, Illinois. He acquired his 
preliminary education in the schools of Ire- 
land and there took up the study of chemis- 
try: After reaching Chicago he resumed 
his studies along that line in the Chicago 
College of Pharmacy and later in the Rush 
Medical College. Previous to entering col- 
lege, however, he engaged as a clerk in the 
drug store of his cousin, Mr. Lee, who was 
doing business on the west side of the city. 
After completing his collegiate course he 
came to Dwight and soon afterward formed 
an association with Dr. Keeley in the work 
which has since made, them and the city of 
their residence famous throughout the land. 
For many years Mr. Oughton was vice- 
president and chemist of the Leslie E. 
Keeley Company, but after the death of Dr. 
Keeley he was elected president and has since 
served in that capacity. The history of the 
institution is too well known to need further 



1 66 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



comment liere. Its splendid work is shown 
by thousands of reformed men to wiiom 
manhood has been restored and who now oc- 
cupy Iionored positions in society and in 
business life. The volume of their business 
has constantly increased and has assumed gi- 
gantic proportions. Their extensive insti- 
tution is fitted up with one of the most com- 
plete laboratories of the country, and the 
work is progressing with undiminished 
strength, its beneficent purpose resulting in 
good immeasurable. 

Mr. Oughton has two children, sons, 
James H. and John R. Socially he is a Ma- 
son and has taken the degrees of the blue 
l(jdge, chapter commandery, consistory and 
the Mystic shrine. He belongs to the Epis- 
copal church, and in his political affiliations 
is a Republican, ardent and earnest in his ad- 
^'ocacy of the principles of the party. He 
has served as a member of the school board, 
has held a number other city offices, and in 
the spring of 1896 was elected mayor of 
Dwight, to which position he has been re- 
elected each succeeding spring. In 1898 
Mr. Oughton, Major Judd and Dr. Leslie E. 
Keeley erected and gave to the city of 
Dwight the present standpipe and water- 
works, built at a cost of twenty thousand 
dollars and unequalled by any system in the 
state in a town approaching the size of 
Dwight. The cement sidewalks of the city 
have been constructed during the mayoralty 
of Mr. Oughton and the town now has bet- 
ter sidewalks in proportion to its size than 
any other in the state. Many other im- 
provements have received his co-operation 
and Dwight owes much to his progressive 
spirit. 

In 1895 Mr. Oughton erected his pala- 
tial residence at a cost of about one hundred 
thousand dollars — one of the finest homes in 



Illinois and the best in this section of the 
state. He is the owner of a very fine ken- 
nel, having some very fine dogs, including 
the famous prize winner, "Heather Lad," 
valued at six thousand dollars. This fine an- 
imal has taken prizes at all of the bench 
shows, and in 1893 and 1894 carried off first 
prize at everv bench show in the United 
States. Mr. Oughton also has a deer park 
upon his place, containing some fifteen or 
twenty head of fine deer. His saddle horses 
are noted throughout this section of the state 
and for a number of years Mr. Oughton 
was extensively engaged in breeding fine 
Kentucky stock. He owns over four thou- 
sand acres of land in Livingston and Grundy 
counties, and with the exception of eight hun- 
dred acres, all is in Dwight township and is 
under a high state of cultivation. While 
intensely devoted to business and a man of 
very decided views and strong convictions, 
he is, by nature, of a very gentle and affec- 
tionate disposition. His moral standing is 
high and he lives up to it. His genial com- 
panionship, his tenacious regard for the sim- 
l)le truth, his unostentatious generosity and 
his large-hearted Christian benevolence are 
among the qualities which have greatly en- 
deared him to his fellow men. His wealth 
has made no difference in his friendships and 
the humblest can obtain from him an 
audience. 



FRANCIS FREMONT FRAKES 

Francis Fremont Frakes, a well-known 
carpenter of Pontiac, Illinois, was born in 
Avoca township, September 12, 1856, a son 
of Labin and Mary A. (Tracy) Frakes. 
The mother was born at Sandy Creek, New 
York, not far from Syracuse, a daughter of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



167 



A. E. Tracy, and came liere alioiit tlie same 
time as her sister, Mrs. Maria Owens, a 
pioneer of Pontiac. wliose sketcli appears on 
another page of tiiis volume. 

Labin Frakes, father cif our subject, was 
born in the southern part of this state, near 
the Missouri line, and as a young man came 
to Pontiac, where he purchased property. He 
was a tailor by trade, but here he engaged 
ii\ the real estate business and also con- 
ducted a liverv stable and stage and transfer 
line between Pontiac and Bloomington. He 
was married here and later moved to Ne- 
vada City, Missouri, where he owned proper- 
ty. He also built a large livery stable at that 
place and ran a stage between Sadlia to Fort 
Scott. After the railroad was built he re- 
moved to Sullivan county, Indiana, and 
while there the Civil wr broke out and he 
enlisted. He participated in the first and 
second battles of Bull Run, and was wounded 
in the latter engagement, being taken to 
Beverly, West \'irginia, where he died from 
the effects of his wounds. His wife then 
returned to Pontiac, where she spent the re- 
mainder of her life. 

After the death of his lather Francis F. 
Frakes lived witii his aunt, Mrs. Maria 
Owens, in Pontiac, for seven years, and at- 
tended school. The only schot)l house then 
in the place stood on the banks of the river 
near the jail. He served a two years' ap- 
prenticeship to the carpenter's trade with 
Andrew Pierce, and later was with William 
Holmes, during which time he helped erect 
many of the early buildings of Pontiac. .Vs 
a journeman he worked in most of the build- 
ings erected at that time, and also those built 
in later years, including the Sterry block. 
He is now one of the oldest carpenters erf the 
city in years of continuous .service, and is 
an expert and skillful workman. 



On the _'4th of March, 1878. Mr. Frakes 
was united in marriage with Miss Orilla 
I'.ngland, a native of Pontiac and a daugh- 
ter of Rue I'jigland, who came here from 
Ohio in ])ioneer days. P.y this union were 
born six children, namely: Orxille Leon 
and Rud\' Rue, who are both emploved in 
the shoe factory in Pontiac; Coral, who was 
graduated from the public schools in 1900; 
Lorene. Fremont and Emma Susan, who are 
all attending school. Mrs. Frakes and the 
children are members of the Episcopal 
church, while our subject leans toward the 
Methodist E])iscoi)al church in religious be- 
lief. The family is tpiite well known and 
highly respected. Mr. ]->akes purchased 
over a half-acre of ground ;it 1003 West 
^Ladi.son street, and has erected thereon a 
nice residence which has now been his home 
for se\en years, though he is one of the 
oldest property holders of the citv. 



JEAX 1". A. \L\CEXT. 

Jean P. A. X'incent, deceased, for many 
years one of the honored and highly-re- 
spected citizens of Pontiac, was born in De- 
troit, Michigan, January 9, 1827, a son of 
Xarcis.se and Clotilda (Prevolsel) Vincent, 
both of French descent. He died the .same 
year at Detroit when our subject was about 
eleven years of age, and he was then ap- 
l)renticed to Charles Buhl, a hat manufac- 
turer of that city, with whom he remained 
until attaining his majority. There he re- 
ceived his education in the public schools. 

At the age of twenty-one, Mr. \'incent 
was sent by the firm of Buhl Brothers to their 
Chicago store, where he clerked for one year, 
and then was employed on a railroad survey 



1 68 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tlirougli Bureau 'county.' Illinois. In 1859 
lie entered' the service of the government 
to go to the northAve'st with a party to take 
meteorological observations, receiving his ap- 
pointment to this position through the influ- 
ence of General Lewis Cass, of Michigan,, 
who always took a warm personal interest in 
our subject and befriended him in many 
ways. Remaining with this expedition 
over a year and a half, Mr. Vincent returned 
to Illinois in the fall of i860, and went to 
Cairo and also to Vicksburg, where he was 
in government employ. While at the lat- 
ter place he was drafted, and served in Com- 
pany C, Fifty-ninth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantrv. until the close of the Civil war, when 
he returned to Illinois and passed the winter 
in \\'enona. In the following spring he 
mo\-ed to Pontiac, where he was engaged in 
the sale of pumps, etc., for about five years, 
when, on account of failing health, he re- 
tired from active business. 

In Lacon, Illinois, August 17, 1861, Mr. 
Vincent was united in marriage with Miss 
Emma Stevens, a daughter of Nathaniel W. 
and Mary (Mix) Stevens. In early life her 
father was a resident of Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, but shortly after his marriage re- 
moved to Lacon, Illinois, where his death oc- 
curred. His wife died at Spring Valley, 
this state, in 1888, at the age of seventy- 
four years. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Vincent. Lewis Cass, the elder, died in 
Henry, Illinois, at the age of fifteen months. 
He was named for General Lewis Cass, of 
Detroit, previously mentioned as a friend of 
Mr. Vincent. Nathaniel N., born in Stark 
county, Illinois, April 8, 1864, is now a resi- 
dent of Spring Valley, where he is engaged 
in the manufacture of cigars. He mar- 
ried Lucy O'Keef, by whom he had two chil- 



dren, Pauline and Gwendoline, who, since 
the death of their mother, have made their 
home with Mr. X'incent in Pontiac. For his 
second wife Nathaniel married Agnes Weir. 
The only child born of this union died in 
infancy. 

Mr. Vincent died at his home in Pontiac 
from a stroke of paralysis January 16, 1898, 
at the age of seventy-one years. He had 
drawn a pension since the close of the war. 
He was always a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party and its principles, and was 
an honored member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to the latter fra- 
ternity in Chicago. An honest, upright man. 
he was highly respected by all who knew 
him, and was a faithful and consistent mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Vin- 
cent, who is a most estimable lady, resides 
in a pleasant home on North Hazel street, 
Pontiac. 



JOEL D. FOSDICK. 

Joel D. Fosdick. familiarly known as 
Squire Fosdick, owns and operates a valu- 
able farm of four hundred acres on sec- 
tion 20, Pike township, whose neat and 
thrifty appearance well indicates his care- 
ful supervision. Substantial improvements 
are surrounded by well tilled fields and all 
the accessories and conveniences of a model 
farm are there found. 

Mr. Fosdick was born in Allegany coun- 
ty. New York, October 4, 1832, a son of 
Aaron C. and Olive (Moon) Fosdick, also 
natives of that state. The father, who was 
Ijorn in 1808, was a carpenter by trade and 
was also engaged in the manufacture of lum- 
ber for a quarter of a century. In 1844 he 




J. D. FOSDICK. 



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MRS. J. D. FOSDICK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



173 



came to TUinciis. niaking- tlie tri]i with a team 
in twenty-two days, and locating in Mar- 
shall county, where he bought one hundred 
and sixty acres of land and opened u[i a 
farm. He sul)sequently purchased two hun- 
tlred acres, and was engaged in the manu- 
facture of lumber in Peoria county for al)Out 
six years, after which he returned to his 
farm in Marshall county, but spent his last 
years with a daughter in Weston, where he 
died April 5. 1885. 

Our subject was a lad of twebe years 
when he came with the family to Illinois, 
and in Marshall county he -^rew to manhood, 
his education being obtained in the common 
schools. He remained at home assisting in 
the operation of the farm until twenty-the 
years of age, and was then married, in 
Boyd's Grove church. Bureau covuity. May 
24, 1857. to Miss Caroline C". (;riswi>ld, a 
native of that county and a daughter of 
Henry Griswold, one of its early settlers. 
Of the five ciiildren born of this imion three 
are living, namely: Olive, wife of John 
Scanlan; and Charles and Albert, who are 
l)oth married and live on the home farm. 
L'elphi E. died at the age of eighteen years, 
and Joel C. died at the age of eleven. 

After his marriage Mr. Fosdick pur- 
chased a farm of eighty acres in Saratoga 
township, Marshall county, but operated one 
hundred and sixty acres, and on disposing 
of that place bought eighty acres adjoining 
his fatiier's place and thirty acres along the 
creek. This lie broke, fenced and improved, 
and continued its cultivation until 1875, 
\\hen he traded it for three himdred and 
twenty acres of his present farm in Pike 
township, Li\ingston county, to which he 
lias since added an eighty-acre tract, making 
a valuble place of four hundred acres. He 
also owns eighty acres in Odell township. 



He commenced life for himself in limited 
circumstances, but being industrious, enter- 
l)risiug and of good business ability and 
.sound judgment he has steadily prospered, 
and is to-day one of the most substantial and 
prosperous men of his community, as well 
as one of its highly honored and respected 
citizens. In connection with farming he 
iil)crated a threshing machine during season 
fur fort}' \-ears. and in that iniderlaking was 
also successful. 

.Since casting his first ]>residcntial ballot 
for Abraham Lincoln in i860 Mr. Fosdick 
has been a stanch Republican, but has never 
sought nor desiretl public office. He has, 
howe\er, taken an active interest in educa- 
tional afl'airs and has been an efficient mem- 
ber of the school board for twenty-five 
years. Without his knowledge he was 
elected justice of the peace and filled that 
office to the satisfaction of all. 



EPHRAIM HOUDER. 

Ephraim Houder, an industrious and 
skillful farmer who is now practically liv- 
ing a retired life on section 13, Eppards 
I'oint township, Livingston county, was born 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 24, 1822, and is a son of Jacob and Bar- 
bara (Kurtz) Houder, the former also a na- 
tive of that county, the latter of Germany. 
Our subject'o paternal grandfather, David 
Houder, was of German descent. In 183 1 
the fatlicr, with his family, moved to Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio, where he cleared and 
improved a farm, making it his home until 
his emigration to Ilinois in 1856, when he lo- 
cated in Livingston county, buying a farm 
three miles southeast of Pontiac, upon which 



174 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lie spent t!ie remainder of his life. He died 
in i86j. his wife the year following. In 
their family were six children, three sons and 
tnree daughters, of whom Ephrann is the 
oldest : David is a resident of Pontiac ; Eliz- 
abeth and Mary both died luimarried ; Henry 
was killed in the Civil war; Martha is the 
wife of Joseph Thomas, of Pontiac; and 
Nancy is the wife of Daniel Shafer, of Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio. 

Oiu- subject received a fair common- 
school education in Montgomery county, 
Ohio, and there grew to manhood. He 
c.'ime with the family to this state in 1856, 
and in October, 1861, enlisted in Company 
C, Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
which was assigned to the Army of the Po- 
tomac and was first under the command of 
General Butler. They participated in the 
battles of Hancock, Virginia, Winchester, 
Chapins farm and Weirbottom Church, 
where Mr. Houder received a gun shot 
wound through the ankle and was disabled 
for a time. His next engagement was at 
Fort Wagner, followed by the battle of 
Drury Bluff, and many others. He enteretl 
the service as a private, but was promoted 
to corporal; and as such was honorably dis- 
charged December 6, 1865. After his re- 
turn home he helped carry on the farm for a 
few years. 

In Joliet, Illinois, May 15, 1867, Mr. 
Houder was united in marriage with Miss 
Hannah F. Harder, who was born near Port 
Byron, Wayne county. New York, where 
she was reared and educated, and when a 
young lady came to Ilinois. Her father, 
John I. Harder, was a native of Hudson, 
New York, and from that place to Wayne 
county, where he espent the remainder of his 
life." Mr. and Mrs. Houder began their do- 
mestic life upon his father's farm near Pon- 



tiac, w here they remained several years, and 
then moved to a farm in Eppards Point 
township, which was their home three years. 
The following year was spent in McLean 
county, and at the end of that time our sub- 
ject purchased his present farm of eighty 
acres on section 13, Eppards Point township, 
Livingston county, which at that time was 
only partially improved. He has tiled the 
place, built a barn and niaile" other substan- 
tial improvements, but is now living retired, 
while his only son, Leroy G. Houder, oper- 
ates the farm. Besides this property he 
owns another farm of eighty acres in Owego 
township. 

In 1852 Mr. Houder suppported Frank- 
lin Pierce for the presidency, but since the 
organization of the Republican party four 
years later he has been one of its stalwart 
supporters and earnest advocates of its prin- 
ciples. He w'as formerly a member of the 
school board, but has never sought nor de- 
sired public office. At one time he and his 
family were members of the Christian church 
at Pontiac, but since it broke up they attend 
the Baptist church. They are well and 
favorably known throughout the community 
in which they reside and justly deserve the 
high regard in which thev are held. 



ORLIX CONVERSE. 

Orlin Converse, a worthy representative 
of the agricultural interests of Livingston 
county, owns and occupies a fine farm of two 
hundred acres of well-improved and valuable 
land on section 33, Owego township, and 
also has an eighty-acre tract two miles from 
his home. A native of Addison county, 
Vermont, he was born on Lake Champlain, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



175 



under the shadows of tlie Green mountains, 
Xoember i, 1834, and is a son of Heman 
Converse, who was born in the same state in 
1799, his ancestors being among the pioneers 
of Vermont. There his grandfather, Pain 
Converse, spent his entire life. He was a 
soldier of the war of 181 2. The father grew 
to manhood in his native county, and married 
Hannah Crampton, who was born in the 
same house where our subject's birth occur- 
red, and where both parents died, the fatiier 
in 1870, at the age of seventy-one years, tlie 
mother in 1888. 

Oriin Converse passed his boyhood and 
youth on the home farm, aiding in its opera- 
tion and attending the common schools of the 
neighborhood. He came west in 1855, join- 
ing his sister Emily, wife of Robert Smith, 
who had located in Livingston county, Illi- 
nois, a year or two previously. He en- 
gaged in farming in partnership with his 
brother-in-law until August. 1862, when he 
enlisted for three years or during the war in 
Company G, One Hundred and Twenty- 
ninth \'olunteer Infantry, which was as- 
signed to the Army of the Cumberland. He 
participated in the battles of Resaca and 
Kenesaw, and all the engagements of the 
Atlanta campaign, being under fire every 
day for a month. After the capture of the 
city the regiment went with Sherman on the 
march to the sea, and was in the Carolina 
campaign, taking part in the last battle of the 
war — that of Bentonville, North Carolina. 
Marching through Richmond, they proceed- 
ed to Washington, D. C, and participated in 
the grand review in that city. Hostilities 
having ceased, Mr. Converse was honorably 
discharged and returned to his home in Illi- 
nois. He had lost no time from illness or 
other causes, with exception of the twenty 
days' furlough he was given in 1864. 



Before entering the service Mr. Con- 
verse was married, in this county, January 
7. 1862, to Miss Rebecca Rockwood, who 
was born here. Her father. Daniel Rock- 
wood, was a native of Massachusetts and one 
of the pioneers of Livingston county, hav- 
ing located here in 1834. He helped to lay 
out tlie county seat and organize Owego 
township, where he took up a claim and en- 
tered land, making it his home until his 
death. Two children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Converse, but Rollin P. enlisted in the 
Third United States Infantry during the 
Spanish-.Vmerican war, and was taken ill 
and died at Atlanta, Georgia, September 2^, 
1898. His remains were brought back and 
interred in Patty cemetery. Jessie, the only 
daughter, died in 1870, at the age of nearly 
three years. 

Mr. Converse's first purchase of land 
consisted of forty acres in Owego township 
where he now resides, and as his financial 
resources increased he added to it from time 
to time until he now has over two hundred 
and eighty acres oi fine farming land, which 
he has placed under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and improved with good and substantial 
buildings. He commenced life here in lim- 
ited circumstances, and the success that he 
has achieved is due entirely to his own well- 
directed and energetic efforts.' After resid- 
ing here for five years he returned east in 
1861 to visit his mother, friends and scenes 
of his youth. By this time he had accu- 
mulated three hundred and fifty dollars in 
the old George Smith money of Atlanta, 
Georgia, but one week after his return home 
it was worth only fifty cents on the dollar, 
and at the end of another the entire amount 
was not worth a dollar. He was thus forced 
to walk back and was six weeks in reaching 
this county. 



176 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Since casting his first presidential vote 
for John C. Fremont in 1856, Mr. Converse 
has been a stanch supporter of the Repubh- 
can party, and he most acceptably served as 
supervisor of his township two terms, during 
which time he was a member of some import- 
ant committees. He has ever taken an 
active and commendable interest in educa- 
tional affairs, has been a member of the 
school board twenty years, and clerk of the 
district during that entire time. He has 
watched with interest the wonderful devel- 
opment of this region during his residence 
here and has always borne his part in its up- 
building and advancement. 



JUDGE NATHANIEL J. PILLSBURY. 

During the last half century the lawyer 
has been a pre-eminent factor in all affairs of 
private concern and national importance. He 
has been depended upon to conserve the best 
and permanent interests of the whole peo- 
ple and is a recognized power in all the ave- 
nues o5 life. He stands as the protector of 
the rights and liberties of his fellow men, 
and is the representative of a profession 
whose followers, if they would gain honor, 
fame and success, must be men of merit and 
ability. Such a one is Judge Pillsbury, 
who served three terms as circuit judge and 
is to-day a prominent citizen of Pontiac. 

He was born in Shapleigh, York county, 
Maine, October 21, 1834, a son of Stephen 
N. and Susan (Averill) Pillsbury, also na- 
tives of that county and representatives of 
good old New England families. He is of 
the ninth generation in direct descent from 
William Pillsbury, who came to the new 
world in 1640 and settled in Dorchester, 



Massachusetts, where he lived until 185 1, 
and then moved to Newburyport, the same 
state, where he purchased land that is still in 
possession of his lineal descendants. From 
him all the Pillsburys in this country are 
descended. The father of our subject, who 
was a farmer and machinist by occupation, 
continued his residence in York county, 
Maine, until after the birth of all of his six 
children, and held different local offices 
there, including those of selectman and 
school agent. In the fall of 1855 he re- 
moved to Bureau county, Illinois, where our 
subject had located the previous spring, and 
engaged in farming near Princeton for three 
3-ears. In 1857 both father and son pur- 
chased raw land in Nebraska township, Liv- 
ingston county, where the former made a 
good home, living there until 1884, when he 
moved to Pontiac and built a residence. This 
continued to be his home throughout the re- 
mainder of his life, though he died in Iowa. 
In politics he was first a Whig and later a 
Republican, and he held doflerent township 
offices here. He was born July 12, 1812, 
and died in November, 1890, while his wife 
was born in August, 18 12, and also died in 
Iowa, in the fall of 1885. She was a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Averill. 

Judge Pillsbury received a good common 
school education and also attended an acad- 
emy in his native county for one term. He 
remained on the home farm with his parents 
until 1 85 1, after which he engaged in teach- 
ing school for two years. He accompanied 
tlie family on their removal to Saco, Maine, 
where he was in the employ of the York 
Manufacturing Company for a time and also 
taught school until 1855. On the ist of Jan- 
uary, that year, he married Miss Eliza J. 
Cole, and the same spring, being threatened 
w ith consumption, he came to Illinois. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



177 



Thougli the journey was made by rail it 
])roved a long and tedious one. taking six 
days to reach Chicago. 

As previously stated the Judge first lo- 
cated in Bureau county, and in 1857 bought 
a farm in Nebraska township, this county, 
which he operated until the spring of 1863. 
Moving to Pontiac he entered the office of 
Samuel Fleming, and after studying law for 
some time was admitted to the bar by e.xami- 
nation. He then formed a partnership with 
Mr. Fleming and in a short time had ac- 
(;uired a lucrative practice and excellent rep- 
utation as a sound and honest lawyer. In 
1869 he was elected a meml)er of the consti- 
tutional convention which met the following 
year, and in 1873 was elected judge of the 
thirteenth judicial circuit, then composed of 
Livineston, Kankakee and Iroquois counties. 
I'our years later the circuit was enlarged by 
adding McLean and Ford counties and be- 
came the eleventh. He was re-elected in 
1879 and again in 1885. serving in all eight- 
een years to the entire satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. He was also one of the first judges 
of the appellate court, being on that bench 
fen and a half years from 1877, and an un- 
deniable proof of his popularity is found in 
his re-elections He wrote many opinions 
that are to be found in the first sixteen vol- 
umes I if the appellate court rejiorts of the 
state of Illinois 

In 1891 Judge Pillshury was urged to 
become a candidate for a fourth term by the 
bi.r and people generally, but on account of 
injuries recei\ed during his second term he 
did not feel physically able to undertake the 
work. On the ist of June. 1882, while re- 
turning to his home from Chicago the train 
on which he was a passenger was besieged 
by a mob of union strikers who desired to 
capture and beat certain non-union lalx)rers 



who were being carried to their homes by 
the railroad company. The rioters began 
firing in and about the cars and the Judge 
received a painful wound from which he has 
never recovered. He held the railroad com- 
pany liable and brought suit to recover dam- 
ages. After a long and tedious litigation 
he carried it to a successful conclusion, al- 
tluiuo-h the great majority of the bar of the 
state, who knew of the circumstances, were 
against his views. The case is reported in 
volume 123. rejjorts of the supreme court, 
being written by Judge John M. Scott, of 
P.loomington. 

For some time after his retirement from 
the bench Judge Pillshury attended to some 
selected cases, but "was not able to do a 
heavy general practice. He owns consider- 
heavy general practice. He owns consider- 
able real estate in Pontiac and built the first 
two-story double flat building ever erected 
ii; the city, it being planned by himself. At 
one time he had a valuable farm of four 
hundred and fifty acres south of the city, 
and at different times has owned consider- 
able real estate in Nebraska, Kansas and 
California. He still has a fine ranch in south- 
ern California, devoted to oranges and 
lemons, and has spent a number of winters 
on the Pacific coast on account of his health. 
He has traveled (piite extensively and 
crossed the continent a dozen times. 

The Judge and his wife have a family 
of three children, namely : Clara .\. is the 
wife of S. E. Sims, of Pontiac, and they 
have one child. Gladys ; C. .Xvis is the wife 
of E. J. Walker, of Sheridan, Indiana, and 
tl.ey have one son, Ernest P. ; and Dale E., 
at home, is engaged in the real estate and 
loan business. Mrs. Pillshury is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. 

In his j)olitical affiliations Judge Pills- 



178 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



bury is a Republican and has been a delegate 
to different state, county and judicial con- 
ventions. Socially he is a Knight Templar 
Mason, a member of Pontiac Lodge, No. 
344, F. & A. M. ; Fairbury Chapter, R. A. 
M ; and St. Paul Commandery, No. 34, K. 
T. He is also a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows lodge and encampment, in which he 
has held all the offices and has been a mem- 
ber of the grand lodge and grand encamp- 
ment since 1868. He was chairman of the 
building committee and of the trustees that 
erected the Odd Fellows block, but gave up 
liis official position when elected to the Ijench. 
He is a man of high intellectuality, broad 
human sympathies and tolerance, and is im- 
bued with fine sensibilities and clearly de- 
fined principles. Honor and integrity are 
synonymous with his name and he enjoys 
the respect, confidence and high regard of 
the people of this section of the state. 



NELSON D. LAWRENCE. 

Nelson D. Lawrence, one of Livingston 
county's thrifty and prosperous farmers re- 
siding on section 26, Pontiac township, with- 
in a mile of the city of Pontiac. was born in 
Warren county, Indiana. June 26, 1850, and 
is a son of Richard Lawrence, whose birth 
occurred in Ohio March 8, 1826. His grand- 
father, William Lawrence, a native of Del- 
aware, was one of the early settlers of Ohio 
and also of Warren county, Indiana. In 
the latter state Richard Lawrence grew to 
manhood and in Vermillion county, Indiana, 
he married Amanda Deyo, a native of that 
county. In 1854 they came to Livingston 
county, Illinois, and settled on a tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres of wild land near 



Pontiac, which Mr. Lawrence transformed 
into a good farm. While a resident of Indi- 
ana he conducted a wagon shop, but he soon 
became a thorough farmer and acquired a 
comfortable competence. He was a man of 
fair education and sound judgment and 
was well and favorably known. He spent 
liis last years in this county, but died while 
at Kirksville, Missouri, March 16, 1894. His 
first wife had passed away many years be- 
fore, dying October 24, 1858. She was 
born February 6, 1830. 

On the home farm Nelson D. Lawrence 
grew to manhootl, assisting in the oi>eration 
of the same and attending the local schools. 
He remained with' his father until grown 
and then worked by the month as a farm 
hand for seven or eight years, after which 
he rented land and engaged in farming on 
his own account. In 1880 he purchased his 
present farm and since his marriage, in 
1885, he has resided thereon, having im- 
proved the place with a good residence and 
substantial outbuildings. He has broken 
thirty acres of virgin soil, has laid many rods 
of tiling and converted the farm into one 
of the most valuable of its size in this sec- 
tion of the county. 

Mr. Lawrence was married, April g, 
1883, to Miss Caroline M. McKee. a daugh- 
ter of James and Nancy ( Sterrett ) McKee. 
natives of Ohio. Her father was born in 
Brown county, that state, June 19, 1813, 
and brought his family to Illinois in 1856, 
locating in Livingston county, where he i^- 
chased land and successfully engaged in 
farming for some years, Init for the j^ast 
five years has lived retired with Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence. His first wife, who was 
the mother of Mrs. Lawrence, dietl Sej)- 
tember 5, 1868. She was born July 14, 
1822, and married ]\Ir. ]\IcKee ]March 17, 



1 
1 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'79 



184 J. Ten cliiklreii were Iiorn of tliat union, 
five sons and five daughters, of whom nine 
readied mature years, and five sons and two 
dausnters are still living. Mr. McKee was 
])ostniaster of Rook's Creek postoffice for 
manv years. Mrs. Lawrence was reared and 
educated in tliis county and hy her marriage 
to our suhject lias become the mother of 
four children, one of whom died in infancy. 
Octa 1). antl James are students in the home 
school. Alethea M. died June 29. 1900. 

In jxilitics Mr. Lawrence is independent, 
\oting for the men he believes best (jualified 
to fill the offices, regardless of party lines. 
He takes an active interest in educational 
affairs and for fifteen years has been a most 
efficient member of the school Ixiard. serving 
as clerk of the board five or six years. His 
estimable wife is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and both are held in high re- 
gard 1) \all will) lia\e the ]ileasure of their 
• accptaintance. 



CH.\RLES R. TRL'ITT. 

Charles R. Truitt. the well-known and 
j)opular editor and proprietor of the Sentinel 
of Pontiac. was born near HillsbDrn, Mnut- 
goniery cnunty. Illinois. Juh- 22. ICS58, a 
>on of .Samuel and Cynthia Ann ( Carr ) 
Truitt. The father was born aliout 1S18. 
not far from Louisville. Kentucky, where 
he grew to manhood aiul married. On com- 
ing to Illinois he first located in Greene coun- 
t}-, where he spent a few years, and then 
made an overland trip to California during 
the early days of the gold excitement, re- 
maining there three years and meeting with 
fair success. He thus obtained a goo<l start 
in life, and on his return to this state pur- 
chased land in Montgomery county, becom- 



ing one of its early .settlers and extensive 
farmers, owning and operating some five 
hundred acres of land. There he spent the 
remainder of his life, dying in February, 
1863. He took cpiite an active interest in 
educational affairs, but was never an as- 
])irant for political honors. His wife sur- 
\i\ed him for many years, dying in the sum- 
mer of iS<;4. Se was a faithful member of 
the Christian cluu-ch and a most estimable 
woman. 

In the county of his nativi^*- Charles R. 
Iruitt was reared, accpiiring his early edu- 
cation in its common schools. He is a grad- 
uate of the W'illiston Seminary, a prepar- 
atory schmil of East Hamjiton, Massachu- 
setts,and for three years attended La Fayette 
College at Easton, Pennsyhania. Later he 
successfully engaged in teaching for .some 
years, being assistant princi|)al of the ]niblic 
schools at Hillsboro. He next became in- 
terested in newspaper work in the office of 
the Hillsboro Journal and later purclia.sed 
the pai)er, which he conducted about four- 
teen years with good success. While there 
he took an active part in Re])ublican politics, 
was a member of the county and township 
central committees and served as a delegate 
to the state convention of his party. L'nder 
1 resident Harrison he served as <leputy col- 
lector of internal re\enue in the eight of 
Springfield district for two years. 

.\fter selling the llillsboro Journal, in 
1895. Mr. Truitt was out of business one 
year and then went to Belvidere, Illinois, 
and ])urcha.sed a half interest in the Belvi- 
dere Xorthwestern, which he sold in the 
sjiring of 1897. In July of that year he came 
to Pontiac and bought the Sentinel, which is 
the oldest paper in the county, being estab- 
lished in 1857. and which has always been 
the official Republican \y.\\>cx of the county. 



i8o 



THE BIOGRAPHiCAL RECORD. 



It is an eijsi'ht-page weekly journal with a 
large circulation, which extends all ov?r the 
county, and is in a flourishing comlition 
under the ahle management of our suhject, 
who has entire charge of its publication. 
Socially he is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and is past grand in 
the latter lodge at both Hillsboro and Belvi- 
dere. He attends and supports the Presby- 
terian church, of which his wife is a mem- 
ber. 

On the ist of October, 1882, Mv. Truitt 
n arried Miss Libbie E. Webber, whc^ was 
born near Collinsville, Madison county, Illi- 
nois, a daughter of Nicholas W'ebber, and 
they have become the parents of three chil- 
dren : Ora, Albert and Beulah. 



JEREMIAH COLLI XS. 

Jeremiah Collins is one of the representa- 
tive agriculturists of Esmen tiiwnship, his 
fine farm of two hundred and forty acres be- 
ii'g con\eniently located on sections 23 and 
2S, w.ithin two miles and a half of CayUga. 
He was born in Miami county. Ohio. Jan- 
uary 22, 1 83 1, find is a son of Daniel Col- 
lins, a native of Darke county, the same 
state. His grandfather. Captain Jeremiah 
Collins, was born and reared in Erance and 
came to the United States with La Fayette 
to fight for American independence. He 
held a captain's commission in the Revolu- 
tionary war. His last days were spent in 
Darke county, Ohio, where he opened a 
farm. There Daniel Collins grew to man- 
hood and married Nancy Penney, a native 
of Kentucky and a daughter of James Pen- 
ney, who was born in Virginia and was later 



one of the pioneers of Kentucky, In early 
life the father of otn- subject followed black- 
smithing in his native state until 1835. when 
he moved to Michigan and settled at St. 
Joseijh, but three years later he crossed the 
lake and came to La Salle county, Illinois, 
becoming one of the first blacksmiths of Ot- 
tawa, where he arrived July 16, 1838; and 
where he made his home' for some years. In 
1844 he located on a farm in Rutland town- 
ship and resided there until crossing the 
])lains to California in 1850. After two 
vears spent in the mines he returned east 
l)-"" wav of the Panama route and New York. 
He continired to live on his farm for many 
years, but died at the home of a daughter 
ir Seneca about 1890. His wife had passed 
a wav some years previously. Of their thir- 
teen children, six reached years of maturity, 
but only Jeremiah and Maria, wife of 
(leorge Pope, of Seneca, Illinois, are now 
In-ing. 

Our subject grew to manhood in La 
Salle county and obtained a rather limited 
education in the district schools. In 1852 
h.e, too, crossed the plains to the Pacific slope, 
being six months upon the road, anil arriv- 
ing in \"olcano, California, September 16, 
that )ear. He spent three years in that state, 
but only engaged in mining for a short time. 
He raised a crop of fall wheat, worked in 
the lumber wocxls over two years and in the 
fall of 185^ operated a threshing- machine. 
In- way of the Panama route he returned 
home and saw the first railroad train he ever 
saw on the isthmus. From New York he 
proceeded to Chicago and arrived home in 
October, 1855. He purchased a farm in 
La Salle county, which he operated until 
1872 and then sold, coming to Livingston 
county. He bought one hundred and sixty 
acres of land where he now resides ; not a 




JEREMIAH COLLINS. 




MRS. JEREMIAH COLLINS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



-^ 185 



tree or shrul) adorned tlie place, with tlie 
exception of a wild rose, and the house was 
small, hut to its improvement and cultiva- 
tion he has since devoted his energies and 
now has one nt tlic most desirahle farms of 
its size in the township. He has erected 
thereon a pleasant residence, two good harns 
and other outhuildings, lias tiled the land 
and placed it under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and has set out both fruit and shade 
trees, which add not a little to the attractive 
appearance of the place. He has also added 
an eight}--acre tract to his first purchase. 

In La Salle county, November 19, 1865, 
Mr. Collins married Miss Eliza J. Turner, 
a native of England and a daughter of 
George Turner, who came to the L'nited 
States in 1844 and started as operator in 
the first woolen mills at Dayton, Illinois. 
Mrs. Collins died in La Salle county Feliru- 
ary 6, 1872, leaving five children: (jeorge; 
William; Martha J., wife of Simon Slyder, 
of Owego township. Livingston countx'; 
Charles; and Warren. Mrs. Slyder is the 
owner of a can of cherries jiut up by her 
mother in July, 1859, and they arc still in 
a perfect state of i)reservation an<l which 
are claimed to be the oldest in the state. .Ml 
of the sons are married and li\'e in Esmen 
township with exception of A\'arren, who 
makes his home in Pontiac township. Mr. 
Collins was again married, in Livingston 
county, October 20, 1872, his second union 
being with Miss Rachel \\'ilkerson, who was 
born and reared in Bixinesboro, Kentucky, 
and came to McLean county, Illinois, with 
her parents, John and Mary Wilkerson. P.y 
this marriage four children were born, 
namely; Mary, wife of Samuel Spears, a 
farmer of Pontiac township; Grace, wife of 
Arthur Donahue, a farmer of Miimesota ; 
John E. and Sadie, both at home. 



Politically IMr. Collins and all his sons 
are stanch supporters of the l\ei)ublicau 
party. He was originally a Democrat and 
cast his first presidential vote for Franklin 
Pierce in 1852. On the 5th of August, 1862, 
he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-eighth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and participated 
in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, Init 
was soon discharged for disability, after 
being confined in the hospital at Xashville 
for some time. He is now a member of the 
T. Lyle Dickey Post. Xo. 105, G. .\. R., at 
pontiac. -Mways a friend of education and 
our public schools, he was for some years 
an active member of the school board both 
ir La Salle and Livingston counties. He 
lias been a resident of this state for sixty- 
two years and has therefore witnessed al- 
most its entire develoi)ment, at the same time 
aiding in its advancement and progress. 



.\LBERT L. Y.\TES. 

Albert L. Yates, a successful veterinary 
surgeon of Dwight, Illinois, was born in 
this county November 21, 1868, a son of Dr. 
Chri.stopher and Almira (Beal) Yates, l)oth 
natives of New York, the former born in 
Montgomery county December 25, 1837, the 
latter in Yates county December 23, 1842. 
The father, who was also a prominent 
veterinary surgeon, enlisted in the govern- 
ment service in that capacity during the 
Civil war and served over three years. 
-Vfter the w;vr he located in Livingston 
cotmty, Illinois, and engaged in farming on 
the Smith farm in Dwight township for 
some time, then removed to Kankakee coun- 
tv and from there to Inxjuois county, but 
in 1880 he returned to this county and again 



1 86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



took up his residence on a farm in Dwight 
townsliip. His s^ns then l)eing; old enough 
to carry on the farm work, he devoted his 
time to the practice of \eterinary surgery. 
In 1885 lie moved to tlie village of Dwight 
and from that time until his death he gave 
his entire attention to practice. Politically 
he was an active worker for the Repuhlican 
party and held a number of local ofifices in 
Livingston count v. He was a man of fine 
phvsi(|ue, being over six feet in height, was 
well informed, intelligent and generous to 
a fault, and possessed a kindly disposition. 
Fraternally he was a member of the Masonic 
order and Grand Army of tiie Republic. His 
wife died in Dwight township October 27. 
1 88 1, and iiis death occurred in the village 
November 17, 1892. 

After the death of the mother the eldest 
daughter took her place as far as possible, 
and the family remained together on the 
farm, which the boys operated. There were 
eight children, namely : George C. and 
^Viliiam E.. who are now farmers of South 
Dakota: Albert L., our subject: Nellie M., 
wife of John Perkins, of Montgomery. Kane 
county, Illinois : Bert, a farmer and school 
teacher of South Dakota : Harry, who was 
born July 2. 1877, and died December 21. 
1880: Alice, wife of \\'illiam Neel, of Kane 
county; and Lefa M.. wife of Fred Neel. a 
brother of William. 

The boyhood and ynuth of iiur subject 
were passed u]ion the home farm and as he 
grew up he receixed excellent practical train- 
ing and experience in ^■eterinary work from 
association with his father. He assisted 
him in his work and also pursued a course 
of study untler his direction. He then passed 
a creditable examination and was granted 
a license by the state board. After his fa- 
ther's death he succeeded to his practice and 



was alone until 1895. \^hen he formed a 
partnershij) with M. L. Livingston, a grad- 
uate of the Ontario \'eterinary College, but 
after being associated with him in practice 
for two years he purchased his interest and 
has since been alone. Possessed of excellent 
ability and skill in his chosen profession he 
has built up a large practice, and by his 
straightforward course has won the esteem 
of the community in which he lives. Po- 
litically the Doctor is a stanch Republican, 
and fraternally is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Sons 
of Veterans. 

Mr. Yates was married. May 29, 1900, 
to Miss Agnes Chalmers, of Dwight, which 
was her home from childhood. She is a 
member of the Congregational church of 
Dwight. 



SAMUEL H. NICHOLS. 

Samuel H. Nichols, a dealer in paints, 
wall paper, etc.. at No. 1 13-1 15 West Water 
street, Pontiac, and one of its leading busi- 
ness men, was bom in that city January t, 
1863, a son of Samuel B. and Lucretia 
( Fox) Nichols. The father was a native 
of Norwich, England, where he was reared 
and educated. At the age of twenty years 
he crossed the broad Atlantic and settled 
in Hamilton. Canada, where he was engaged 
as a sailor on the great lakes and followed 
that life for some years. He came to Pon- 
tiac, Illinois, on the 4th of July, 1853. ar- 
riving in this city on the first train that came 
over the Chicago & Alton Railroad. He 
had been previously married, at Cincinnati. 
Ohio, to Miss Lucretia Fox, a nati\e of 
Keene. New Hampshire, and a daughter of 
Samuel and Dorothv Fox, and bv this union 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



187 



were born two cliildren : Mrs. L. G. 
Sdiwartz. i)t Cliicago, and Samuel H., our 
subject. After coming to Pontiac the fa- 
tlier engaged in the restaurant business, 
which lie continued until his death, wliich oc- 
curred September 30, 1865. He was a sol- 
liier of the Me.xican war and a man liiglily 
respected and esteemed by all who knew 
him. His wife survived him many vears, 
dying at Pontiac. in 1887. at the age of six- 
ty-three years. 

The subject of this sketch is indebted 
to the public schools of Pontiac for his edu- 
cational advantages. During his youth he 
learned the painter's and paper hanger's 
trade and worked as a journeyman until 
1884. when he embarked in the same busi- 
ness on his own account, and has succeeded 
in building up a large and lucrative trade. 
He has the only exclusive wall paper and 
jiaint store in the city or in fact in the coun- 
ty, and occupies two large sales rooms. Xo. 
1 13 and 1 15 West Water street, keeping on 
hand a large stock of paints, oils, brushes, 
wall paper, room moulding, etc. Mr. Nich- 
ols devotes his entire time to the store, tak- 
ing contracts for large jobs of painting and 
paper hanging, and furnishes emplovnient 
to a large force of skilled workmen. 

On the 8th of September, 1888, in Pon- 
tiac, Mr. Nichols married Miss Mollie Har- 
rison, of Carthage, Missouri, a daughter of 
John W. and Mary Ann Harrison, of that 
city, where her father is engaged in business 
as a dealer in staple and fancy groceries at 
731 West Chestnut street. At present Mr. 
Nichols is living at 705 West Howard 
street, Pontiac, in a modern two-story frame 
dwelling erected by him in 1898. 

He is an active and prominent member 
of Pontiac Camp, No. 5, M. W. .A., of which 
he is at present banker, antl a member of 



the Pioneer Reserve .Association, in which 
order lie is serving as local deputy. Re- 
ligiously he is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. By his ballot he supports the men 
and measures of the Republican party, and 
in the spring of 1900 was its candidate for 
alderman from the secontl ward, where he 
is so well anil faxorably known, it having 
always been his home. As a business man 
lu ranks among the ablest in the city, being 
enterprising, energetic and industrious, and 
the success that he has achieved in life is due 
to his own well-directed efforts, for in start- 
ing out in life for himself he was without 
capital or influential friends to aitl him, but 
to-day is a prosperous and successful busi- 
ness man. 



JOHN MUNSON. 

John Munson. one of the honored vet- 
erans of the Civil war and a well known 
tarmer residing on section 20. Owego town- 
shi]), four miles from Pontiac. was born 
Xo\ember _'8, 184J. in Denmark, where he 
was reared and educated. He worked on a 
farm and learned the carpenter's trade l)e- 
forc bis emigration to .\mcrica in i860. 
On landing in this country he proceeded to 
]-a Salle county. Illinois, where he found 
employment as a farm hand for one year. 
In i86j he enlisted in Company B, One 
Hundred and Fourth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, which formed a part of the .Vrmy of 
the Tennes.see, and he participated in the 
battle of Hartsville, Tennessee, where he 
was taken prisoner with his regiment. He 
was held a captive at Murfreesboro until 
])aroIed and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, and 
later to Camp Douglas, Chicago, where he 
was exchanged at the end of si.x weeks. In 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the meantime he contracted inflammatory 
rheumatism and was sent to the hospital. 
When lie had sufficiently recovered his 
health to he about he was placed on hospital 
duty and served in that capacity until hon- 
orably discharged at the close of the war, in 
1865. He has never yet full}- reco\-ered 
from the effects of his army service. 

On receiving his discharge Mr. Munson 
joined a brother in Livingston county, but 
later returned to La Salle county, where he 
spent one year. At the end of that time he 
located permanently in this county, where he 
and his brother operated a rented farm fur 
two or three years, and for three years he 
clerked in a store in Pontiac. Subsecjuently 
he engaged in the clothin.o- and gents fur- 
nishing business in that city for fi\-e years, 
and at the end of that time traded his stock 
of goods for a farm west of Pontiac, but 
sold that place at the end of a year and 
bought the farm in Owego township where 
he now resides. At that time it was but 
slightly improved, but he has planted an 
orchard, erected a neat and substantial resi- 
dence and a good l)arn, and to-day has a 
well-improved and valuable farm of eighty 
acres. He also has another eighty acres on 
section 18. the same township. This prop- 
erty has all been acquired by industry, per- 
severance and good management, for be 
came to this county empty-handed and has 
had to make his own way in the world un- 
aided. 

On the 30th of Decemlier, 1874, Air. 
Munson was united in marriage with Miss 
Elizabeth Dufif, a native of Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania, who came to Illinois 
with her father, Charles Duff, in 1866, at 
the age of about fifteen years, locating on a 
farm in P*ontiac township, this county. Bv 
this union were Ixirn two children. Eva, the 



elder, is now the wife of Benjamin Miller, 
a farmer of Owego township, and they have 
two children. AN'ilbur John and Frances Eliz- 
abeth. Louis D., the only son of our sub- 
ject, assists in the operation of the home 
farm. Mr. and Mrs. Munson have given 
a home to a little girl, Toleto Hansen, whom 
they are now rearing. 

Politically Mr. Munson is a stanch sup- 
p<:irter of the Republican party, having cast 
liis first presidential vote for U. S. Grant in 
1868, and for every nominee of the party 
since that time. Socially he is a Master 
Mason, and religiously both he and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Pontiac. They are widely and 
favorably known and ha\'e a host of warm 
friends in the communitv where they re- 
side. 



HORATIO N. VAUGHAN. 

Horatio N. Vaugban, whose home 
is at No. 522 North Chicago street, Pontiac, 
Illinois, is one of the prominent citizens of 
that place, a leader in musical circles. He 
is a native of Springfield, Sullivan county, 
New Hampshire, and a son of John 
and Mary (Moran) Vaughan. Her paternal 
grandparents were Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Rider) Vaughan, natives of Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, who moved from there to St. Mar- 
tin's, New Brunswick, where the grandfa- 
ther died at an advanced age. He followed 
the ship carpenter's trade throughout life, 
but also devoted a great deal of time to the 
study of music and was a proficient player 
on several instruments, his favorite being 
the violin. He was a member of an orches- 
tra antl band in St. Johns, New Bruns- 
wick. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



189 



Jolin \*aughan, the father of our subject, 
was also born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and 
was married at St. Martin's, New Bruns- 
wick, but soon afterward lie left Canada and 
removed to Sullivan ciuiniy. New Hamp- 
shire, where all of his ten children were 
born, our subject being the youngest. There 
he engaged in fanning on quite an extensi\e 
scale, though, during his early life in Nova 
Scotia, he had followed the ship carpenter's 
trade. In 1837 1'^ came to Illinois and was 
one of the first settlers of Princeton, where 
he conducted a hotel for ten years and then 
lived retired until his death, which occurred 
in 1877, when he was eighty-seven years 
of age. Only two of his family are now 
living, our subject and his brother, John, a 
retired merchant of Seattle, Washington. 

Until he attained his majority, Horatio 
N.A'aughan remained under the parental roof 
and was educated in Illinois by private 
tutors. At the age of twelve years he com- 
menced the study of music and received in- 
struction on the violin from some of the 
best local teachers of that day. He contin- 
ued his studies for a number of years and 
he has since given his time and attention to 
that art as a profession. About 1862 he 
became connected with the band and orches- 
tra of a theatrical company, and, as leader 
of the orchestra, traveled with some of the 
leading theatrical and show companies as 
the Van Amberg, and others, at that time. 
Leaving the road in 1872, he taught music 
as a band instructor in various cities of Illi- 
nois and Wisconsin until locating in Ponti- 
ac in December, 1877. Here he formed a 
class on the violin, and with the exception 
of a few years spent in Seattle, Washington, 
he has since taught music at this place. 
About nine years ago he organized and be- 
came leader of the Vaughan orchestra of 



Pontiac, consisting of fourteen pieces, which 
still exists and is the leading musical organi- 
zation of the city, its services being in great 
demand. Most of the players were former 
pupils of ]\Ir. Vaughan. 

In May, 1880, at Pontiac, Mr. \'aughan 
married Miss Margaret A. Stites, a daugh- 
ter of Dr. J. J. Stites, one of the prominent 
physicians of this city. She is a highly ed- 
ucated lady and also an accomplished mu- 
sician, receiving her musical education at the 
College of Music in Cincinnati, under the 
management of Theodore Thomas, one of 
the most noted musicians this country has 
produced. She plays first violin in her hus- 
band's orchestra, and as teacher of the piano 
forte has a large private class. She is also 
supervisor of music in the public schools of 
Pontiac, a position she has most creditably 
tilled for a number of years, and which re- 
quires much of her time and attention every 
day. As will be seen Mr. and Mrs. Vaughan 
are among the most prominent musicians of 
the city and are entirely devoted to their 
art. 



OWEN PEEHAN. 

Owen Feehan, one of the most popular 
and influential citizens of Nevada township, 
Livingston county, whose home is on sec- 
tion 20, was born in Grundy county, Illi- 
nois, June 15, 1861, and is a son of Owen 
and Maria (Killian) Feehan, natives of 
Kings county, Ireland, where the father 
followed the occupation of farming. Soon 
after their marriage they emigrated to the 
United States and took up their residence 
in Grundy county, Illinois, where he pur- 
chased land, making their home there until 
1869, when they removed to Nevada town- 



ipo 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ship, Livingfston county. Here he liad pre- 
viously purchased the south half of section 
20, which at that time was unimproved land, 
but was soon transformed by him into one 
of the most desirable farms in the locality. 
He continued to reside there until the spring 
of 1892, when he moved to Odell and has 
since lived in retirement from active labor, 
enjoying a well-earned rest. He and his 
wife are members of the Catholic church of 
that place, and are highly respected and es- 
teemed by all who know them. To this 
worthy couple were born ten children, eight 
of whom reached man and womanhood, 
namely : Patrick, a resident of Nevada town- 
ship; John, of Seward county, Nebraska; 
Lawrence, of Nevada township, this county; 
Ellen, wife of J. C. Lennan, a merchant 
of Odell; Charles, a molder by trade and a 
resident of Morris, Illinois; Lizzie, wife of 
John Carey, a farmer living near Kinsman, 
Grundy countv; Owen, our subject, and Ed- 
ward, who was accidentally killed by the 
train at a crossing- at Kinsman. 

The subject of this review began his ed- 
ucation in the schools of Grundy county, 
and after coming to this county, at the age 
of eight years, continued his studies in the 
schools of Nevada township. When he first 
located here the nearest school was three 
miles from his home. He continued to at- 
tend school at intervals until he attained his 
majority, and acquired a good, practical ed- 
ucation. 

On the 1st of June, 1887, Mr. Feehan 
married Miss Julia A. Feehan, who was born 
in Grundy county, June 18, 1861, and suc- 
cessfully engaged in teaching for seven years 
prior to her marriage, having charge of the 
school in district No. 4, where she now re- 
sides, besides six years in other counties. 
She was educated in L^tica, La Salle countv, 



Illinois. Her father, John Feehan, was a 
nati\e of Ireland and came to the new world 
in early youth. He resided in La Salle 
county for many years, but his last davs 
were spent in Grundy county, where he died 
in 1891. He had a family of seven chil- 
dren, six of whom grew to maturity, and in 
order of birth these are as follows : Sarah, 
wife of M. J. Dempsey, who is engaged in 
the shoe business in Chicago; Kate, widow 
of J. M. Dempsey, who was engaged in the 
grocery and meat business in that city, where 
she still resides; John, a detective and ser- 
geant on the Chicago police force; Thomas 
I'., who conducts a grocery and meat mar- 
ket in the same city; Julia A., wife of our 
subject, and Vincent, who is in the employ of 
the Cuhady Meat Company, pf Chicago. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Feehan were born five chil- 
dren, namely: Edith Balbina, who died at 
the age of eleven months; Mary Alice, Grace 
Agnes and Julia K., all in school, ^nd Eliza- 
beth Veronica, a bright baby of two and a 
half years. 

After his marriage, Mr. Feehan moved 
to Chicago, where he was engaged in busi- 
ness for two years, but at the end of that 
time he returned to Livingston county. He 
operated rented land for a time, and then lo- 
cated on the old homestead, where he is op- 
erating one hundred and sixty acres of well 
impro\ed and highly cultivated land, and is 
meeting with good success. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Feehan are members 
of the Catholic church of Odell, of which 
Father Griffey is pastor, and he also belongs 
to St. Paul's Court, No. 618, Catholic Order 
of Foresters, of the same place, of which he 
is one of the trustees, and is a member of 
Nevada Camp, No. 4070, Modern Woodmen 
of America, of which he is advisor. As a 
Democrat he has always taken an active part 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



191 



in politics; has been a delegate to county 
conventions a number of times, and is now a 
member of the township central committee 
of his party. On attaining^ his majority, he 
was elected school director, which office he 
held for six years, and for one year he 
served as collector. He was road commis- 
sioner the same length of time, and assessor 
six years. In the spring of 1900 he was 
elected supervisor of his township and re- 
signed the office of assessor. 

His public service has been most exem- 
plary and his private life has been marked 
by the utmost fidelity to duty. He has 
given his supixjrt to all measures for the pui> 
lic good, and is justly numbered among the 
valued and useful citizens of his communitv. 



\\1LL1A.M F. C. LEHAIAXN. 

Germany has furnished to the new world 
many of its most enterprising and progres- 
sive citizens — men who have taken an active 
part in the development of the locality in 
which the}- make their home, and have ex- 
erted a great influence for good in the com- 
munity. Mr. Lehmann is a worthy repre- 
sentative of this class. He has met with 
well deserved success in his adopted country, 
and is now the owner of a valuable farm of 
four hundred acres on section 29, Owego 
townshi]), Livingston county, Illinois, four 
miles and a half east of Tontiac. 

Mr. Lehmann was born in Mecklenburg, 
Germany, May i, 1853, and attended the 
schools of his native land, but is wholly 
self-educated in English. In 1871, at the 
age of eighteen years he emigrated to the 
United States and first located in Peoria 
county, Illinois, where some friends from 



the fatherland were living. He obtained 
work on the farm of William Spicer, a sub- 
stantial farmer of that county, wlm proved 
a good friend to the German hul, and he re- 
mained in his employ four years. In 1876 
he came to near Clienoa, in Livingston coun- 
ty, where he commenced life for himself 
upon a rented farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, which he successfully operated for 
seven years. At length, in 188 J, he was 
able to purchase one hundred and twenty 
acres of land in Owego township, where he 
now resides. At that time it was only par- 
tially improved, and the house standing 
thereon was quite small, but it has since been 
replaced by a more commodious and sub- 
stantial residence, the land has been tiled, 
fences built, also a good barn, and water 
works and stock scales addetl, making it one 
e)f the best ecpiipijcd farms in the locality. 
He has also extended the boundaries of his 
farm until they now include four huiulred 
acres of rich and fertile land. This prop- 
erty has all been acquired through his own 
well-directed efforts, and he is to-day one 
of the substantial men of Owego township. 
In this county, Mr. Lehmann was mar- 
ried, January 22, 1877, to Miss Augusta, 
Louise Leduc, who was born in New York 
City. Her father. General Louis Leduc, 
was a native of France and a highly edu- 
cated gentleman, .speaking eight different 
languages. He was an officer in the French 
army and took part in several wars. Later 
he came to America and was married in New 
York city, where he made his home for some 
time, but subsequently came to Livingston 
county, Illinois. Here Mrs. Lehmann was 
reared and educated by her father. Of the 
ten children born to our sul)ject and his wife, 
two died in infancy. Those living are : Lena, 
now the wife of George Rights, a farmer of 



192 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Owego townsliip, by wliom she liad a son, 
William; Albert, who assists his father in 
the operation of tlie farm; Emma, William, 
Mattie, Julius, Rudolph and Willis Ellis, all 
at home. 

By his ballot Mr. Lehmann supports the 
men and measures of the Repviblican party, 
but has never cared for official honors. He 
is now serving as Canada thistle commis- 
sioner and as school director, having been 
president of the district board for fourteen 
years. He and his wife are prominent and 
influential members of the German Baptist 
church,and he takes a very active part in Sun- 
day school work, serving as president of the 
township Sunday school society seven years. 
For some years he was superintendent of the 
Methodist Episcopal Sunday school, and 
now holds the same position in the Swigart 
Sunday school. For a few years he was su- 
perintendent of both Sunday schools at 
the same time. In all the relations of life 
he has been found true to every trust reposed 
in him, whether public or private, and justly 
deserves in the high regard in which he is 
uniformly held. 



JOHN KLEIN. 

John Klein, one of Pike township's most 
progressive and public-spirited citizens, 
owns and operates a well-improved and val- 
uable farm of two hundred and forty acres 
on section 22. He is a native of Germany, 
born in Rheinpfalz, Bavaria, August 24, 
1833, and is a son of Jacob and Margaret 
(Weiser) Klein, also natives of that coun- 
try, where the father followed the weaver's 
trade. In 1855, accompanied by his family, 
he emigrated to America and located in 



lazewell county, where some of his friends 
from Germany had previously settled and 
where he rented a little house. At that time 
he had four sons and one daughter, all of 
\\hom worked and it took their wages for 
one year to pay their passage across the At- 
lantic and the expenses of their trip to this 
state. The second year the father rented a 
farm in Deer Creek township, Tazewell 
county, for one-half the crop raised, and in 
1864 purchased, a farm in Pike township, 
Livingston county, tipon which he spent the 
remainder of his life, dying there in Decem- 
ber, 1878, his wife in 1874. In their family 
were seven children, of whom four sons and 
one daughter are still living. 

Our subject acquired a good practical 
education in the common schools of his na- 
tive land, which he attended for eight years, 
but his knowledge of the English language 
has been self-acquired. At the age of four- 
teen he commenced earning his own liveli- 
liood. working out while in Germany, and 
for four years after coming to this country 
he worked for and assisted his father in get- 
tmg a start. He then began life for him- 
self as a farmer upon rented land. 

In Tazewell county Mr. Klein was mar- 
ried, January 25, 1864, to Miss Margaret 
Moschel, also a native of Bavaria and a 
daughter of Christian and Margaret 
Moschel. Her father, who was a cabinet- 
maker by trade, died in Germany, and sub- 
sequently she and her mother and seven 
children came to the new world in 1862, lo- 
cating in Tazewell county, Illinois, where 
she lived for several years and then came to 
Pike township, Livingston county, where 
she purchased a farm and there died Octo- 
ber 4, 1886. IMr. and Mrs. Klein are the 
parents of seven children, namely : Katie, 
wife of Theodore Lommatsch, of Pike town- 




JOHN KLEIN. 




MRS. JOHN KLEIN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



197 



ship, lias two children. Clara and Raliili ; 
Lena, wife (if Louis Lommatsch. uf the 
same township, has one son. Elnier ; 
-\nna, at home; John married Miss Katie 
Schocn])eck, and they liave one daughter, 
Mahcl, and he operates a part of his father's 
farm; Matilda. August and I'.melia, at 
liome; one, the oldest of the family, died in 
infancy. 

For finir years after his marria.<;e Mr. 
Klein cnntiuued to rent land in Tazewell 
county, and in 1869 came to Livingston 
county, locating upon a partially impro\ed 
tarm of forty acres in Pike township, which 
he had ])urchased a year or two hefore. As 
his financial rest)urces have increased lie has 
added to his landed possessions from time 
to time until he now lijis two hundred and 
forty acres of rich and arahle land, which 
he has placed under excellent cultivation and 
unproved with a gtiod set of farm huildings. 
His success in life is due to his industry, 
enterprise and good management. He is 
a man of good husiness ahility and sound 
judgment, and carries forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. 

Originally Mr. Klein was identitied with 
the Democratic party and cast his first pres- 
idential vote for Samuel J. Tilden in 1876. 
but of recent years has been independent in 
politics, supporting the best men, regardless 
of party affiliations. He has taken a very 
active and influential part in public afifairs, 
has been a delegate to many county, sena- 
torial, congressional and state conventions, 
and has been honored with a number of im- 
portant official positions, having ser\ed as 
township clerk fourteen years, supervisor 
two years, assessor two years, justice of the 
peace eight years, a member oi the school 
board, and president ami clerk of the dis- 
trict many years. His official duties have 



always been most faithfully and satisfac- 
torily performed, winning the commenda- 
tion of all concerned. In 1885 Mr. Klein 
and X. J. Myer antl others established the 
Eppards Point Fire Insurance Company, 
and the former was made i)resident, the 
latter secretary of the same. Our subject 
is one of the most public spirited and enter- 
prising men of his community and has done 
much to aid in the development and further 
the interests of Pike townshi]). Religiously 
he and his wife are members (jf the Lu- 
theran church. 



CHARLES l-:i)\VAR]) WATSOX. 

Charles Edward W^atson, now deceased, 
was born in Indiana, in which state he was 
reared and educated. In his youth he learned 
the trade of wagonmaker and when a young 
man he came to Pontiac, first, in 1857, and 
for a time engaged in his chosen occupation. 
He later returned to his native state, but in 
1862 again came to Pontiac, which continued 
his home until his death. 

On the 19th of April, 1864, Mr. Watson 
was united in marriage with Miss Cordelia 
JUick, by whom he had three children. Clara 
\\'. is now the wife of Ale.xander Algeo, a 
frn-nier of Rooks Creek township, and they 
have two children, .Anna Louise and Walter 
Samuel. Jesse X., born January 13, 1870, 
married April 14, 1897, Miss Mary Lorena 
Cross, of Peoria, and they reside in Chicago, 
where he is engaged as a draughtsman. 
Willim A., born September 4, 1872, is a 
contractor and builder in Larkin, Kansas. 
While still residing in Pontiac, he did a 
good deal of architectural work. 

Mr. W'atson was called to his reward 
May 4, 1887. Fraternally he was a member 



198 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Politically he was a Repuhlican, and for a 
time held the office of street cnnimissioner 
of Pontiac. 

Mrs. Watson still makes her home in 
Ptjntiac, where she is well known and great- 
ly esteemed. She inherited the musical 
talent of her father and has sung in the 
choirs of the Methodist Episcopal, Baptist 
and Presbyterian churches of Pontiac, thus 
aiding bv her voice the worship in song in 
the various churches. 



JOHN H. OLESOX. 

Among the prospert)us and successful 
farmers of Esmen township, Livingston 
county, who have made their own way in the 
world imaided and have succeeded in ac- 
cumulating a handsome competence, is John 
H. Oleson, whose home is on section 30. 
He was born in Norway, in 1850, and when 
seven years of age was brought to the United 
States by his father, Ole H. Oleson. who 
first settled in La Salle county, Illinois, and 
came to Livingston county five years later, 
locating in Esmen township, where he is 
now living a retired life with his youngest 
son, at the age of seventj'-eight years. He, 
too, was an agriculturist anil met with ex- 
cellent success in his labors. 

Since the age of twelve years John H. 
Oleson has been a resident of Livingston 
county and is indebted to her public schools 
for his educational advantages. The old 
homestead adjoins the farm where he now 
lives, and he aided in its operation until 
twenty-four years of age. He was then 
married, in this county, June 10, 1874, to 
Miss Isabel Highland, who was also born 



in Norway, and came to this country at the 
age of six years with her father, Ole High- 
land. The}" settled in Li\ingston cnuntv, 
where she grew to womanhood. The chil- 
dren born to our subject and his wife are: 
Elsie, wife of Benjamin Peterson, of Liv- 
ingston count}- : Cordelia, wife of Oscar 
Hetland ; Ida, wife of George Thompson; 
Clara and Obeil. both at home. 

For two years after his marriage Mr. 
Oleson engaged in farming upon rentetl land 
and then purchased eighty acres of raw- 
prairie land, on which he now resides, and to 
the improvement and cultivation of which 
he has since devoted his energies with most 
gratifying results. As he has prospered he 
has added to his farm two eighty-acre tracts, 
and now- has a fine place of two hundred antl 
forty acres, which he has tiled, fenced and 
placed under a high state of cultivation. 
In addition to this he has an eighty-acre 
tract, given him by his father, making a total 
of three hundred and twenty acres. He 
j)ossesses many of the admirable character- 
istics of the Norwegian people, being in- 
tlustrious, economical and persevering, anil 
to these may be attributed his wonderful suc- 
cess. By his ballot he supports the men and 
measures of the Republican party, and has 
served as school director in his district. He 
and his wife are members of the Lutheran 
cliUrch and are widely and favorably known 
throughout their section of the countv. 



CHRISTIAN VERCLER. 

For over a quarter of a centur}- this gen- 
tleman has been prominently identified with 
the agricultural interests of Livingston coun- 
ty, and now owns and successfully operates 
a valuable farm of three hundred and twenty 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



199 



acres on sections 27, 31 and 33. Pike town- 
ship. He was born July 14. 1852. in the 
jjrovince of Lorraine, France, now a ])art of 
Germany, and is a son of Christian X'ercler, 
Sr.. one of the most prosperous and pro- 
gressive farmers in that part of the county. 
He was echicated in Imth the Frencli and 
Cierman languages, but has acquired iiis 
knowledge of English since coming to Amer- 
ica. He sailed from Havre and landed in 
Xew York. September 2"^, 1872, and came 
direct to Livingston county, Illinois. Two 
}ears later he was joined by his father, who 
bought two hundred and forty acres of land 
in Pike township, but was not long permitted 
to enjoy his new home, as he died the same 
year. 

On liis arrival here uiu' subject com- 
menced working Ly the month at farm labor, 
and was thus employed for a year and a 
half. He then assisted his father in the im- 
provement and cultivation of the place, and 
after the latter's tleatb, he and his brothers, 
Andrew, Joseph, Jacob and Peter, continued 
its t)peration fur three years. In 1881 our 
.subject purchased eighty acres of his present 
farm, and to it he has since added until be 
now owns an excellent farm of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres, wliicli he has jjlaced 
under a high state of cultivation and im- 
proved with good and substantial buildings. 
He has made for himself an honorable rect)rd 
in business and by bis well-directed efforts 
has acquired a handsome competence. 

On the 1st of January, 1881, in Pike 
township, Mr. \'ercler was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Emma B. Le Due, a native 
of that township and a daughter of one of its 
most prominent old settlers. Louis Le Due. 
I'ive children blessed this union, but Bertha 
died in childhood. Those living are, Will- 
iam, Alice, Rudolph and Nettie. 



By bis ballot Mr. \'ercler usually sup- 
ports the men and measures of the Demo- 
cratic party, but at local elections votes in- 
dejjendent of party lines, supporting the men 
whi>m he believes best qualified to fill the 
offices. He served some years as township 
clerk, collector of taxes one year, highway 
commissioner si.x years, and a member of the 
school board and district clerk nineteen 
years. He is a worthy representative of 
that class of citizens wlu) lead (juiet. in- 
dustrious, honest and useful lives, and con- 
stitute the best portion of the community. 
Religiously he is a member of the Mennonite 
church. Mrs. Vercler is a member of the 
German Baptist church. 



JOHN W. r.KLXER. 

Jiijni W. liruner, a ijrominent and repre- 
sentative business man of P<Mitiac, residmg 
on East Water street, was born in Greene 
county, Ohio. July 8, 1837, a son of Peter 
and Elizabeth (Tytusj Bruner. The father 
and mother were both born in Loudoun 
county, Virginia, and about 1835 removed 
to Ohio, locating near Xenia, where he en- 
gaged in milling and mercantile business. 
J-ater be carried on the dry-goods business 
in Butler county and at Germantown, Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio, and from that state 
he inoxed to Wabash county, Indiana, where 
he purchased a large tract of land and en- 
gaged in farming throughout the remainder 
of his life, dying there in 1852. His widow- 
continued to reside on the farm until 1855, 
when she went to live with her brother, F. 
J. Tytus a prominent merchant and pork 
packer of Middletown, Butler county. Ohio, 
and a \ ery wealthy and benevolent man, who 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was born February 5, 1806, ami died at the 
age of sixty years. After li\ing' with him 
two years, Mrs. Bruner made Iier home with 
her son-in-law, Dr. Samuel Stew art, in Ham- 
ilton, Ohio, where she died at the age of 
about sixty years. The Bruner family is of 
German descent, tlie grandfather of our sub- 
ject having come to this country from Ger- 
many with three brothers and settled m the 
west. Peter Bruner. who was born Decem- 
ber 2, 1791, was a son of George Peter 
Bruner. His wife, Elizabeth, liorn Febru- 
ary 23, 1801, was a daughter of Tunis and 
Jane Tytus. 

To Peter and Elizabeth (Tytus) Bruner 
were born five children, four of whom 
reached years of maturity, namely : ( i ) 
Francis J., who owned a large sugar plan- 
tation in Louisiana, was a Confederate sol- 
dier in the Civil war, and died in that state 
in 1899. Three of his children are still liv- 
ing on the plantation. [2) Jennie E. is the 
widow of Dr. Samuel Stewart and is now 
living in Pontiac, Illinois. She has three 
children : Frank, a tinisher in the shoe fac- 
tory of that place; Lizzie, wife of S. W. 
Strong, assistant superintendent of the Illi- 
nois state reformatory, and John R., who 
is employed in the shoe factory. (3) Will- 
iam H. married Elizabeth Cook, of Pontiac, 
and is engaged in the grocery business in 
that city. (4) John W., our subject, is the 
youngest of the family. 

During his boyhood John W. Bruner at- 
tended the common schools of Butler county, 
Ohio, and completed his education at Den- 
nison University, Granville, that state. He 
remained at home tintil 1852, and after leav- 
ing college entered the dry goods business 
at Cincinnati and later at Middletown, in 
1861, where he remained until the fall of 
1864, when he sold out and came to Pon- 



tiac, Illinois. For nine years he carried on 
farming in Pontiac township. Livingston 
county, where he owned twci hundred and 
sixty acres, and also three hundred and 
t\\ enty acres in Eppards Point townshi]), and 
also raised, bought and sold stock. At the 
end of that period he removed to the city of 
Pontiac, where he has since engaged in the 
real estate and stock business, meeting with 
marked success. He has also three thousand 
acres of land near Stuttgart, Arkansas, 
w hich is devoted to stock raising at the pres- 
ent time. He is an enterprising and pro- 
gressive business man, energetic and reliable, 
and easily wins the confidence and good will 
of all with whom he comes in contact. Po- 
litically, he is a stanch Republican, but has 
never cared for official honors, while re- 
ligiously he is a member of the Baptist 
church, and socially affiliates with the 
Knights of Pythias, being one of the older 
members. 

On the 15th of August, 1861, Mr. 
Bruner married Miss Eliza J. Crane, a 
daughter of Stephen C. and Elizabeth 
(Simpson) Crane. Her father, a native of 
New York, moved to Butler county, Ohio, 
at an early day and there engaged in farm- 
ing with most gratifying success, becoming 
the owner of a large aniou;''*^ of both farm 
and city property. About 1865 he brought 
his family to Pontiac, where he engaged in 
the real estate business cjuite extensi\ely. 
He was a large stockholder in the first coal 
shaft sunk at this place, and was also con- 
nected with the first woolen mill established 
here. He seemed to prosper in all his lui- 
dertakings and accumulated considerable 
wealth. He died in Pontiac, in 1880, leav- 
ing over two thousand acres of improved 
farming land in Livingston county, besides 
a large amount of city property and a thou- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sand acres of land in otlier parts of the 
west. Mrs. Bruner was born in Butler coun- 
ty, Ohio, January 25, 1843. Of the four 
children born to our subject and his wife 
only one is living. Hal C, residing at 208 
East Water street, is engaged in the tile 
business in Pontiac, and is also interested 
in a manufacturing , business in Chicago. 
He married Carrie S. Sims, of Pontiac. and 
they liave three cliiklren. namely: E\a. 
Eeonora and Crane. 



JOHX BALMER. Sr. 

A brilliant example of a self-made .Amer- 
ican citizen and a grand examplification of 
the progress that an ambitious foreigner can 
make in this country of unbounded oppor- 
tunities, is shown in the ca.se of John Balmer. 
one of the most successful and prosperous 
farmers and stock raisers of Livingston 
county. He resides on section 26, Pontiac 
township, within one mile nf the city of Pon- 
tiac. 

Mr. Balmer was Ixirn in Switzerlanil, Oc- 
tober 31, 1829, and came to .\merica with 
his father. Christian Balmer, in 1840. ln- 
cating first in Hancock county. Ohio, near 
the present city of Findlay, where the father 
bought land. With the assistance of his 
sons he cleared and improved his place, trans- 
forming it into a good farm. There he died 
about 1853. 

Our subject attended the public schools 
of his native land, but his knowletlge of Eng- 
lish has been acquired through his own ef- 
forts since coming to the new world, at the 
age of eleven years. He aided his father in 
tl;e arduous task of clearing the home farm, 
and remained with him until grown. It was 



in 1852 that he came to Livingston county, 
Illinois, and the following year he purchased 
the farm where he now resides, consisting of 
t)ne hundred and thirty-seven acres, which he 
bought in partnership with his brother-in- 
law, but since 1861 he has been sole owner 
of the place. As an agriculturist he has 
steadily prospered, and has added to his 
landed possessions from time to time imtil 
he is now the owner of eleven hundred acres 
i)f valuable land in this county, besides his 
investments in Nebraska and Kansas. In 
connection with general farming he has en- 
gaged extensively in the raising and feeding 
(if cattle for market. 

In the fall of 1854. Mr. Balmer tlrove 
back to Ohio, and was there married to Miss 
Xancy .\tlkins, a native of Pickaway county, 
that state, and a daughter of David .Adkins. 
By this union four children have been born, 
namely: Melissa is now the wife of Allen 
Scott, of Joplin, Missouri, and they have 
two children, John and Pearl; J. P., who 
assists in the operation of the home farm, 
married Anna Belle Blair, and they have 
two children living, Everet and .Angle, two 
ha\ing died ; Leonard S. is at home, and 
-Anna is the wife of Madison Phipps, a 
farmer of this county, and they have one 
child, Jesse R. 

In his ])olitical views Mr. Balmer is a 
stanch Republican, but at IcKal elections he 
endeavors to support the best man, regard- 
less of part affiliations. He has never cared 
for public office, preferring to devote his 
entire time and attention to his extensive 
business interests. Socially he is a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows society at Pontiac. 
and has filled all the chairs, being at present 
past grand of his lodge. For almost a half- 
century he has made his home in Livingston 
county, and has bore his part in its develop- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ment during; that period. He lias seen the 
swamps drained, and a large tract of what 
at first appeared to be waste land trans- 
formed into rich and fertile fields. The 
career of Mr. Balmer seems almost phe- 
nomenal, yet his success is by no means the 
result of fortunate circumstances. It has 
come to him through energy, labor and per- 
severance, directed by an evenly balanced 
mind and honorable business principles. He 
has always made the most of his opportuni- 
ties.and his successful life excites the admira- 
tion of all. 



\\ILLIAM ARAIITAGE. 

\\ illiani Armitage, deceased, was born in 
Tipperary, Ireland, on the 13th of Decem- 
ber, 1826, and when twenty-two years of age 
came ti.i the United States with his father, 
Richard Armitage, who settled in Wayne 
county. New York, where he died at an ad- 
vanced age. Our subject located in Roch- 
ester, New York, where he engaged in the 
manufacture of brick for a short time, and 
in 1865 came to Illinois, settling near Odell, 
Livingston county, where he engaged in 
farming for a few years and then established 
himself in the brick and tile lousiness in 
Odell. in which line he was engaged for 
over twent}' years. He commenced life as a 
poor boy, but by his industry, perseverance 
and upright dealing with all with whom he 
came in business contact, he soon became a 
thrifty business man, and one who had the 
respect of all his fellow citizens. 

When Mr. Armitage first settled in Odell 
there was no church or cemetery in the place, 
and he helped build the first church and was 
always a large contributor to its support. 
His business constantly increased under his 



al)le management until it became one of the 
leading industries of that part of the coun- 
try, furnishing employment to a large num- 
ber of men and turning out a product all 
knew as excellent. Later he sold the tile 
and brick business to Trecker Brothers and 
mo\ed to Iowa, but after spending two years 
in that state he returned to Odell, where he 
made his home until the fall of 1899 and 
then came to Pontiac to live quietly after 
the labors of a well-spent life, during which 
he had prospered. He had surrounded him- 
self by all the comforts of life and was en- 
joying the rest which comes to the faith- 
ful worker, when he was called to that long 
and peaceful rest, February 25, 1900, after 
an illness of only a few days, leaving a 
widow and four children to mourn the de- 
parture of a devoted husband and a kind and 
mdulgent father. 

Mr. Armitage was married, in Tyre. 
New York, in 1854, to Miss Ann M. Thorp. 
a daughter of Munson and Ann Eliza (Ar- 
mitage) Thorp. Her father was a native 
of New Hampshire, but at an early age 
moved to New York and located in Onon- 
daga county, where as a mechanic he spent 
over sixty years of his life, dying there at 
the age of eighty-seven. His wife died in 
Wayne county, the same state, when Mrs. 
Armitage was only four years of age. Mrs. 
Armitage has only a brother living. Rev. 
\\'allace W. Thorp, a Presbyterian minister 
of Poughkeepsie, New York. 

To our subject and his wife were born 
eight children, three of whom died in New 
York state and one in Odell, this county. 
'i"he living are as follows : ( i ) Clara Belle 
is the wife of Alfred Burns, a farmer of this 
county, and they have two daughters : Ruth 
A. and Charlotte. (2) Wesley L., of Odell, 
married Edith Bockman, and thev have three 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



203 



cliildren. \\'illiam S.. Lucile and Floyd B. 
(3) Elton C, an attorney of Chicago, mar- 
ried Alice McConnell. and tliey have one 
child. Edna. (4) Lillian F. is the wife of 
S. X. Donahue, who has a large restaurant 
and bakery in Pontiac. 

Mr. Arniitage was converted antl united 
with the Methodist Episcopal cinirch at tlie 
age of twenty-three years. He was soon 
elected superintendent of the Sunday school, 
and was also a class leader. .\ devoted 
Christian, an upright citizen and business 
man, he was always t\)und on the right siilc 
of every moral issue, and was strictly tem- 
perate and a faithful worker in the temper- 
ance movement, and was a constant reader 
( f tlie best literature, having a well-stocked 
library. \\ bile devoted to his business and 
the accumulation of property, be found time 
to gratify bis fondness for field sports with 
rod and gun. In politics be was a Republi- 
can. l)ut took no active part in political mat- 
ters, yet was always interestetl in all public 
afifairs that tended to advance the wlfare of 
the community in which he lived. Mrs. Ar- 
niitage laid the remains of her beloed luis- 
band to rest in the cemetery at Odell, where 
so many years of their happy life bad been 
passed, near the church be had helped to 
build, and of which he had been such a de- 
voted member and constant attendant. Mrs. 
Arniitage has bought a large, pleasant home 
on East North street, Pontiac. where she 
e.xpects to spend her remaining years be- 
loved and resi)ected by all wliu know her. 



JOHX FKAXCIS SULL1\".\X. 

John Francis Sulli\an, a well known 
and prominent ilruggist, of Cbatswortli, was 
born in Peoria, Illinois, March 10, 1868, a 



son of John and Ellen Sullivan. The fa- 
ther, who was Ixirn in county Cork, Ireland, 
came to America in 1862, and after .spend- 
ing five years in New York City, became 
a resident of Peoria, Illinois, Where for two 
years he was employed as section foreman 
on the Toledo, Peoria & Wabash Railroad. 
His wife died in 1873, leaving three chil- 
tlren : Mary Ellen, who died in Sciota, Illi- 
nois, in 1893; Julia, a resident of Xew 
York Citv, and John F., our subject. Shortly 
before the death of bis wife Mr. Sullivan 
moved to Sciota, McDonough county, Illi- 
nois, where he made his home for twenty- 
rive years, being in the employ of the rail- 
road as section foreman nearly all of that 
time. He owned a farm, which he improved 
and operated for about two years. He is 
now a resident of Chatsworth and is still 
in the employ of the railroad, having been 
connected with section work for thirty-one 
years. For his second wife he wedded 
Mary Laverv. by whom be has four chidren : 
Cornelius, who is married and lives in Ma- 
comb, Illinois; Sarah, Annie and Elizabeth, 
all at home with their parents. 

Our subject received his educatiun in the 
public schools of Sciota and at the Macomb 
Xormal School. He remained at home 
witii his father until sixteen years of age, 
and then entered the Chicago College of 
I'barmacy, where be took a two-years course 
and was graduateil in 1884. He found em- 
ployment as prescription clerk in different 
drug stores of Chicago for nine years, and 
in 1893 came to Chatsworth, where there 
appeared to be a good opening and purchased 
the old established business of H. M. Bangs. 
Since the store came into his possession he 
has increased the stock to double the amount, 
and the volume of business is several times 
what it was. He carries a complete line of 



204 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



drugs,clruggists| sundries, wall paper, paints, 
oit§,..etc., and is meeting with well deserved 
snccess. 

Mr. Sullivan was married, Tune 28, 1895, 
to Miss Mary Eva Smith, a native of Chats- 
worthj and the oldest daughter of James 
A. Smith. They have one son, Richard 
Francis, born June 19, 1896. In his po- 
litical affiliations, Mr. Sullivan is a Repub- 
lican, but has never accepted office, though 
he has been tendered public position, pre- 
ferring to give his entire time and attention 
to his business interests. He is a communi- 
cant of the Catholic church, and a member 
of the Modern Woodmen Camp, No. 1829, 
of Chatsworth. 



NELSON BUCK. 

Nelson Buck, deceased, was a well 
known citizen of Pontiac from 1850 to 1869. 
He was born in Chemung county. New 
York, April 10, 1808. and was a son of 
Aholiab and Annis (Drake) Buck, natives 
of Chemung county. New York, Init who 
at a verv early da_\' came west and located in 
Peoria county, Illinois. On his removal to 
Illinois, on the present site of the city of 
Peoria there was only a block house and the 
place was known as Fort Clark. Aholiab 
Buck took up a tract of land from the gen- 
eral government about eleven miles from the 
present city, which he improx'ecl and on 
which he resided until his death. His wife, 
who was a memlier of the Presbyterian 
church, survived him for some years, dying 
in i860, at the age of nearly eighty-three 
years. She was a daughter of Benjamin 
Drake, a native of one of the eastern states. 

Nelson Buck grew to manhood in his 
native coimty and there received a gCKxl 



literary and nnisical education, ])eing for 
Some years a teacher of vocal music. He 
first married Miss Fidelia W'ithey. of Port 
Bvron, New York, and they made their 
home in that place until her death. \\'ith 
his father's family he then came west to 
Peoria county, and later married Miss Annis 
Knapp, daug'hter of James and Margaret 
(Drake) Knapp, also eastern people from 
near Homer, New York. She was born in 
1812. 

After his arrival in Peoria county Mr. 
Buck learned surveying and followed the 
occupation of a surveyor during the re- 
maintler of his residence in that county, do- 
ing nnich of the early survey work, and 
being a careful and methodical man the cor- 
rectness of his lines was seldom cjuestioned. 
He continued to reside in Peoria county 
until about 1840, when he moved with his 
family to Bloomington, McLean county, 
where he continued to follow his chosen 
occupation. He also established one of the 
first nurseries in that vicinity, in which line 
of business he was quite successful. While 
residing in Bloomington, in 1844, his wife 
(lied, leaving five children, Clarissa died, a 
ytiung, lady, in 1854, in Pontiac. Willard 
P. was a member of the Forty-seventh Illi- 
nois \*olunteer Infantry during the Civil 
war, and faithfully served his country in 
that terrible struggle for the preservation of 
the Lnion. He is now a resident of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan. Cordelia is now the 
widow of Charles Watson and resides in 
Pontiac. Alice and Edwin died young. 

iMr. Buck lived in Bloomington and con- 
tinued his business there until his marriage, 
in 1850, with Mrs. Maria Fellows, of Pon- 
tiac. when he removed to the latter city and 
t<x:)k charge of her estate, which consisted 
of a farm, hotel and many town lots and 




NELSON BUCK. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



207 



undivided real estate in that place. By his 
sound business judgment he put the estate 
into good shape antl which later reali2e<l a 
handsome return. He never would permit 
a bar to be run in connection with the hotel, 
but run it on strict temperance principles, 
li burned down July 9. 1856. 

Mr. Buck's skill as a surveyor secured 
him the appointment as government sur- 
veyor in 1869, and he was sent to resurvey 
the line between Kansas and Nebraska. He 
left Plattsmouth, Nebraska, July 5. 1869, 
and was last heard from at Fort Kearney, 
from which place he started for Fort Mc- 
Pherson, Init never reached the latter place, 
being killed by the Indians while <•» route. 

In the various places where he made his 
home. Mr. Buck became somewhat promi- 
nent in business, social and musical circles. 
He was one of the early trustees of the vil- 
lage of Pontiac, before the present thriving 
place put on city airs. He tix^k an active 
part in the prosecution of every moN-ement 
for the improvement of the village, and 
much credit is due him for its substantial 
growth just prior to and after the close of 
the C"i\il war. 

Mr. Buck never lost his interest in nm- 
sical affairs and while residing in Bloom- 
mgton he was one of the most ])rominent 
musicians of the place. He was a luember 
of the Presbyterian church, connected with 
its choir and early introduced a violin as a 
help to the musical exercises of its services, 
much to the horror of some of the good, 
staid old members of the church, a few of 
whom arose and walked out of the church. 
On his removal to Pontiac he became prom- 
inent in musical circles here, as well as lead- 
er of the choir in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Fraternally he was a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



Few men in Livingston county were bet- 
ter known or held in higher esteem than 
Nelson Buck, arid his untimely death was 
mourned not alone by his immediate family 
but the entire cominunitv as well. 



WILLIAM ROOK. 

William Rook, a thrifty and prosperous 
farmer residing on section j6. Forrest towu- 
ship. Livingston county, Illinois, was born 
October jo, 1821, in Lincolnshire. England, 
where his [jarents, Thomas and Mar\- (Sut- 
ton ) Roi^k, sjient their entire li\-es. The 
father was a prosperous farmer, was a hard 
working, industrious man. and highly re- 
siiected by all who knew him. P)oth he and 
his wife held membership in the church ni 
England. He died at the age of seventy- 
five years, and his wife, who passed away 
several years ])re\ious. died at the age of 
sixty. ( )ur subject was the oldest of their 
eight children, four of whom came to this 
country. 

William Rnuk dbtained his early educa- 
tion in the cumnmn sclmols of his birth - 
])!ace. and reni;iined at home assisting his 
lather on the farm until 1851. when he 
emi<''rated to .\nicrica. landing in Phila- 
delphia July i^). lie first went to Delaware, 
where he worked on a farm two summers, 
and then removed to New York state, but 
remained there only a few months, not being 
pleased with the outlook in that state, and 
hearing of the cheap lands in Illinois, he 
decided to locate here, and on the 8th of 
October, 1853, he arrived in Peoria comity, 
where he rented land and engaged in farm- 
ing for twelve years. For two years he 
worked bv the month and in 1868 came to 



208 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Livingston county, where lie purchased 
eighty acres of raw land on section 27. For- 
rest townsliip. This he broke, tiled and im- 
proved, by the erection of a good residence 
and large barn, and he still owns the prop- 
erty. It was his home until 1882. when he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres on 
section j6, the same townshij). and erected 
another set of farm buildings. He has added 
other impnn'enients from time to time and 
now has one of the best farms in his local- 
itv. He has a pleasant home. Avhich is pre- 
sided over by his daughter. Mrs. Spray. 

On the 5th of May, 185 1, Mr. Rook was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary Bickett, 
also a native of England and the only child 
of very highly respected parents. She died 
September 2. 1873. at the age of forty-seven 
years, and was laid to rest in Forrest cem- 
eterv. She was a consistent member of the 
Methcxlist Episcopal church, a woman of 
many excellent finalities, a devoted wife and 
loving mother. Hers was a well-spent life 
and Mr. Rook gives her credit for a large 
share of his success. She was indtistrions 
and amljitious and was ever a cheerful help- 
meet. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rook were born ti\-e 
cbiUlren. namely: ( 1 ) Marry, bcjrn in Del- 
aware, in .Kugust. 1852, is now the wife of 
George Swartz. a prosperous farmer of Ne- 
braska, and they have five children. Emma. 
William. Harry. Clara and OUie. all torn in 
Livingston county. Illinois, except Ollie, 
who was born in Nebraska, (j) J- ^^'ill- 
iam, Iiorn in Peoria countw Illinois, in 
]March. 1854, wedded Mary Gouldsbury, and 
li\-ed on the original homestead of the fam- 
iiv on section 27, Forrest townsliip. I)ut is 
now working by the month on a farm in 
McDonough county, this state. His wife is 
now deceased, leaving one son, Frederick, 



who was born in F(~irrest townshi]i. and is 
now sixteen years of age. He is working on 
l"iis uncle's farm on section 27, that town- 
sliip. (3) Eliza, born in Peoria county, 
March 6, 1S36, was educated in the common 
schools of Livingston county, and was mar- 
ried. February 4, 1875, to Ephraim R. 
Sprav, who was born in Fountain count\'. 
Indiana. February 18, 1850, a son of J. T. 
and Mary Spray, and died October 18, 1881. 
He was conscious up to the time of his death 
and expressed a willingness to die. He was 
aware of the approach of the end, saying. 
"Oh. motiier. the great transaction is done, 
it is all well with me." His remains were 
interred in Forrest cemetery. He was a de- 
voted husband and father, and left a wife 
and three children to mourn his loss. Of 
the children Mary, born in Livingston coun- 
ty April 12. 1876. was married. January 12. 
1898, to Robert McKinley. who is engagetl 
in farming on a quarter-section of land in 
Charlotte township. Living'ston county, and 
they have one child. Clarence, born Decem- 
ber 26, 1899. John, born June 3, 1878, and 
Charles, born .\ugust 18, 1880, were edu- 
cated in the district schools of Forrest town- 
ship, and are now working u]ion our sub- 
ject's farm. (4) Thomas, born in Peoria 
county in October. 1858. married Katie 
Faragher, of Forrest township, and lives 
on his father's farm of eighty acres on sec- 
tion 2/. although he owns a farm of bis 
own. (5) Sarah, born in Peoria county, 
died at the age of three years and was buried 
there. 

Since casting his first presidential vote 
for Stephen A. Douglas Mr. Rook has af- 
filiated with the Democratic party, and as a 
public-spirited citizen he takes an active in- 
terest in all that tends to the improvement 
and advancement of the ciMiimunitv in which 



i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



209 



lie lives. He li.is always lieen a hard work 
irsf and persevering man. whose spirit was 
not cast down l)y the hardships of his early 
pioneer life, and his determination to suc- 
ceed .soon enabled him to accumulate prop- 
erty, so that he is to-day one of the pros- 
perous as well as one of the highly respected 
citizens of the township. He has many 
friends and no enemies, and now, at a ripe 
old age. is enjoying the fruits of his early 
industry. 



JACOB E. BROWX. 

Jacul) K. Mrown, who is engaged in the 
general banking business, together with the 
ii surance and loan business, has been a resi- 
dent of Li\ingston county since 1857. dur- 
ing which time he has been an imjxirtant 
factor in its material growth and j^rosperity. 
He was born near W'atertown, Jefferson 
county. New \'nrk, Se])tember 29, 1838, 
and is the son of 'i'honias Y. and Mary A. 
(Everett) i'rowu, both of whom were na- 
tix'es of Xew \ drk, born in the same local- 
ity, near llrownsville. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Ilenr}' county, was born in Bucks county, 
I'ennsylvania, near the city of f'hiladel])liia, 
but in an early day moved to Jefferson coun- 
t\-. Xew York, where he cleared the land of 
timber and made a farm of eight lumdred 
acres. The city of Brownsville was named 
in his honor. There he lived and died. Dur- 
ing the boyhood of our subject there were in 
the neighborhood of Brownsville about eight 
hundred peo])le. o\er three-fifths of whom 
bore the name of Brown, and all related. 

Thomas Yarley Brown, the father of 
our subject, was engaged in farming in his 
native state, a portion of the time in partner- 



ship with his father. For some years he 
was a brigade commander in the Xew York 
militia, serving with credit to himself and 
the state. In 1855 he came west and piu"- 
chased a large tract of land in what is now 
(ierman\-ille township. Livingston county, 
and in 1856 he came out with the intention 
o* making it his permanent abode. In 1857 
his wife and family joined him and they took 
up their residence in a story and a half 
frame cottage which he had erected for the 
l)urpose. It was 16.X24 feet and ser\ed as 
the home for the family a few years, when 
ii was added to. making a larger residence. 
On that farm he continued to reside until 
1S70. when be mo\ed into the village of 
Chatsworth. where he lived a (|uiet. retired 
life until his death. February 4. 1899. H's 
wife is yet li\ing and makes her home with 
our subject. They were the parents of three 
children, of whom our subject is the oldest. 
Sarah .\. is the wife of J. C. Shear, of 
Onarga. Illinois, where he is living a re- 
tn-cd life. Mary Frances is the wife of Joel 
R. .Strawn, who for many _\'ears was en- 
gaged in I'arming in b'orrest townshi]). but 
is now li\"ing retired in the \illage of For- 
rest. Mrs. Mary .\. Brown is now eighty- 
three years of age and is a well preserved 
woman. She was a member of the Episco- 
pal church. Her husband was past e'ghty- 
eight years old at the time of his death, his 
father. Henry Brown, also dying at the 
same age. In politics he was originally a 
Whig, but later a Republican. In the early 
days he ser\ed as assessor for some years, 
and was also a member of the school board 
for many years, and served for a time as a 
member of the board of trustees of the vil- 
lage of Chatsworth. He was a member of 
the board in Chatsworth when the present 
school house was erected. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Jacob E. Brown, our subject, was named 
for General Brown, who was commander-in- 
chief of the United States army for a time, 
a man of more than ordinary abiHty. His 
boyhood and youth were spent in his native 
county and state, and in the pubHc schools of 
Brownsville he took his primary course, 
after which he entered Brownsville Acad- 
emy, and after pursuing the regular course 
he graduated therefrom. After coming 
west he took a commercial course at East- 
man's Business College, Chicago. 

Coming west with the family Mr. Brown 
remained with his parents, assisting in the 
management of the farm until in .\ugust, 
1862, when he enlisted in Company M. Ninth 
Illinois Cavalry, and was mustered into the 
service at Springfield, Illinois. The regi- 
ment was sent to Chicago, and in November, 
1862, was sent south, having its first brush 
with the enemy at Pilot Knob, Missouri. 
From that time until the close of the war 
it was in active service. Crossing the Mis- 
sissippi river at Helena. Arkansas, it took 
]iart in many shirmishes from Cairo to 
A'icksburg, and also around Little Rock, 
Arkansas, and up the White river, the na- 
ture of the service partaking of a guerrilla 
■warfare. This was the case until the spring 
of 1864. It was then with the main army 
through Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, 
and all through that section until the close 
of the war. During its term of service it 
enlisted oxer eight thousand men, but only 
about six hundred returned home at the close 
of the war. It was in some very severe en- 
gagements. .\t La Grange. Arkansas, the 
division with which it was connected lost 
o\er two thousand men in an hour and a 
lialf. 

Mr. Brown entered the service as a 
pri\ate, but in a short time was appointed 



corporal and later sergeant in his company. 
On the 19th of November, 1864, with forty- 
two other men. he was taken prisoner at 
Shoal Creek, Tennessee, while reconnoiter- 
ing in front of Hood's army, which was 
making its advance on Nashville, Tennes- 
see. He was held a prisoner until March, 
1865. when he was paroled and sent to the 
parole camp at Vicksburg. He was impris- 
oned at Cahaba, Alabama, where ten thou- 
sand LTnion prisoners were held. While 
yet a prisoner he was commissioned second 
lieutenant and was later assigned to the 
staff of Cienera] Hatch. He was honorably 
discharged from the service in May, 1865, 
with the rank of second lieutenant. 

After receiving his discharge Lieutenant 
Brown returned home and shortly after- 
ward took the course in Eastman's Business 
College, as already stated. Completing the 
course he returned to the farm and continued 
to be actively engaged in farm labor until 
1875, having the management of the home 
farm of over twelve hundred acres. The 
hard work necessary to the management of 
such an estate told upon his health, so much 
so that he was compelled to abandon it, and 
in January. 1875, he moved to the village of 
Chatsworth and for a time engaged in no 
active business. 

On the 16th of January, 1868, ]\Ir. 
Brown was united in marriage with Miss 
Elizabeth B. Pope, a native of Kentucky and 
fourth in order of birth in a family of seven 
children. Her father, Thomas A\'. Pope, 
moved from Kentucky to Illinois in 1856. 
locating in a grove in Ford county, now 
known as Pope's grove, and which was 
named for him. There he engaged in farm- 
ing for many years and then mo\'ed to Piper 
City, Ford count}', Illinois, where he lived 
retired and where his death occurred. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



To Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born tliree 
children. R. Finley, who is engaged with 
I. IS father in tlie banking business, and who 
is vice-president of the bank, was a mem- 
ber of Troop K, First IlHnois Ca\alry. dur- 
ing tlie Spanisli- American war. W'itli his 
regiment lie was sent to Chickamauga Park, 
where he was taken ill and returned home. 
Later he was sent to Fort Sheridan, where 
he was honorably discharged and mustered 
out of the service. He is a graduate of 
Peeksville, Xew York. Military .\cademy, 
and also of the Xew \'ork Military .\cadcmy 
at Cornwall, Xew York. Elizabeth McKee, 
at home, is a graduate of a female seminary 
near Peekskill. Xew York. Madge Everett 
is attending O.xford College at Oxford. 
Ohio. 

On bis restoration to health, about one 
year after his removal to Chatsworth, Mr. 
Bnjwn went into the bank of C. .\. \\'ilson 
& Comj)any as cashier, and held that posi- 
tion until 1885, when he purchased the 
business, and under the firm name of J. E. 
Brown & Company it was continued until 
January, 1900, when it was re-organized as 
the Bank of Chatsworth, with Mr. Brown 
as president, R. Finley Brown, vice-presi- 
dent, and Ed M. Reesing. cashier. The 
bank is doing a verj" satisfactory business 
and has the confidence of the entire com- 
munity. In addition to his regular banking 
business Mr. Brown is agent of some of the 
leading fire insurance companies of the 
L'nited States, in which he has placed many 
policies. He is also interestcfl in farm lands 
in Illinois, Indiana and Xorth Dakota, and 
in the latter state has two thousand, five 
hundred and sixty acres in the counties of 
Steele and Cass. He was formerly largeiv 
interested in the Ogallala Land & Cattle 
Company, importers of Hereford cattle, but 



o'. late years he has confined himself to his 
private business. 

Mr. Brown is a worker in the Presby- 
terian church of Chatsworth. in which for 
many years he has been one of the trustees. 
Fraternally he is a member of Chatsworth 
Lodge. Xo. 538, A. F. & .\. M. ; Fairbury 
Chapter, Xo. 99, R. .\. M.. and St. Paul's 
Commandery, Xo. 34, K. T.. of Fairbury. 
He is also a member of E. C.. Trask Post, 
Xo. 388, Ci. A. R., and was its first com- 
mander, and has since almost continuously 
served in that office. In politics he is a 
Republican and cast his first presidential 
vote for the great Abraham Lincoln. He 
has served as a member of the village board 
of trustees and has been ])resitlent of the 
same. He also served on the school boanl 
while residing on the farm. He has, how- 
ever, ne\ er been a seeker after office. 

As a citizn Mr. Brown has always been 
enterprising, ready to do his duty when that 
duty is presented to him. He shipped the 
first car-load of corn from Chatsworth, go- 
ing to Oilman to order the car. At that time 
corn was shelled with a hand sheller, there 
being no others in use. In the forty-three 
years in which he has been a citizen of Liv- 
ingston county rapid changes have been 
made, the county n(jw ranking with the 
best in the entire state, with improvements 
second to none. In all that has been done 
he has borne well his yrnvt. 



JOSEPH F.\RXEY. 

Joseph Farney, who is successfully en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits on section 
28, Forrest township, Livingston county, 
Illinois, was born in Lewis county, Xew 
York, March 16, 1842, a son of John and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Annie (Zehr) Farney. The father, a native 
<if Germany, came to the United States at 
the age of sixteen years and located in Lewis 
cmmty. New "S'ork, becoming- one of its well- 
ti >-tlo and prosperous farmers. He died 
there at aljout tlie age of sixty-three years. 
His wife is stih living near the old home- 
stead at the age of eighty years. Our suh- 
iect is the oldest of their nine children, six 
of whom survix'e. 

Josepli h'arney remained at home with 
his parents, assisting in the work of the farm 
until 1868. when he came to Livingston 
county. Illinois, and purchased a farm of 
eighty acres in Forrest township, which he 
t iperated for ten years. He then bought one 
hundred and forty acres of h's present farm. 
which at that time was only partially im- 
pn)\ed. and to its further development and 
culti\-ation he has since devoted his energies 
with most gratifying success. He has ex- 
tended its boundaries until he now has two 
hundred and forty acres, upon which he has 
built a substantial residence, a commodious 
barn and other outbuildings, and now has 
line of the best impro\-ed farms in the local- 
it}-. His success is well deser\-ed. as he is 
an industrious, enterprising n-ian — (ine who 
lias helped to make the county what it is 
to-day, one of the richest farming districts 
in the state. Besides the \'aluable farni al- 
ready mentioned he now owns fort)' acres 
on section 21 and eighty acres on section 
16, Forrest township. For several years he 
has held the office of school trustee and has 
done n-iuch to improve the schools of district 
Xo. 8. 

On the 1.2th of April, 1871, Mr. Far- 
ney married Miss Lena Yoder, one of a 
familv of six children, whose parents were 
Joseph and .\nnie (Kempf ) Yoder. The fa- 
ther was l)orn in .\lsace, France, in 182J, 



and when a boy came to America, residing 
in the New England states until he reached 
luanhood. Subsequently he made his home 
in New York state for a number of years, 
and in the spring of 1867 came to Livings- 
ton County. Illinois, and purchased a farm 
in F"orrest township, which he improved and 
culti\-ated for S(irne time, but the last three 
V'ears of his life were spent in retirement 
from active labor in Fairburv. He became 
(|uite a prominent and prosperous man of his 
community. He died May 23. 1888, leaving 
a widow, who is still living, three sons, three 
daughters and twenty-seven grandchildren. 
Mr. and Mrs. Farney are the parents of 
seventeen children, all li\ing with the ex- 
ception of Lydia, who died at the ag;e of 
eight weeks. John, the eldest, now twenty- 
seven years of age, is a farmer in the em- 
ploy of Mr. Watson, of Forrest township; 
Samuel works on his father's farm ; Edward 
operates eighty acres belonging to his fa- 
ther : Joseph is engaged in farming near the 
homestead ; Andrew is also an agriculturist ; 
Rachel, now residing with her father, is the 
widow of Andrew Weisser, a carpenter, 
who died May 24, 1899, leaving one child. 
Aldine, born March 3, 1899; Mina is the 
wife of Conrad Wenger, a farmer of Fair- 
bury, and they ha\-e one child, Roy ; Annie, 
Emma and Elmer, twins, Fred, Malinda, 
Orviile, Walter, Jess and Arthur are all 
at home. All were born in Livingston coun- 
ty, educated in the local schools and live on 
the home farm or near it. 



A BR AM LOWER. 

,\hram Lower, a prominent and intluen- 
tial citizen of Broughton township, residing 
on section 10, has been a resident of Liv- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



213 



ineston county since tlie spring of i860, 
and has been actively ident tied with its as;- 
ricuhural and polit cal interests. He was 
born in Blair comity, I'eiinsyhan'a, Octo- 
I)er 10, 1835, a son of Da\ id and Susan 
(Rhodes) Lower. Tliough in early life the 
fatiier learned the trades of weaver, carpen- 
ter and joiner, he followed fanning prin- 
cipally. On coming to Illinois in 1861 he 
settled in Livingston county, but two years 
later moved to Carroll county, and dieil at 
his home in Lanark, in i88j, at the age of 
eight V years. His wife surxixed him for 
some time, dying in December, 1898. at tliL 
age of eighty-eight years. To them were 
born ten children, of whom one died in in- 
fancy. The others were Levi, a \eteran of 
the civil war, who now li\es in Kansas and 
whose sons are prominent in banking cir- 
cles; Samuel, a resident of Dwight. Illinois: 
Abram, our subject; Catlierine, wife of 
Samuel McCoy, of Lanark; Kel)ecca. who 
died in 1864; Martin, who died from disease 
contracted in the army during the civil war: 
Anna, wife of John Chestnut, of Adair, 
Iowa; Leah, wife of (jeorge Weed, of La- 
n.ark; and Eli L.. who was also one of the 
boys in blue during the civil war and is now 
a resident of Lanark. 

.\bram Lower received his education in 
the common schools of his nati\e state and 
was reared upon his father's farm. In 1858 
he came to Illinois and settled on the pres- 
ent site of Lanark, the locality at that time 
being unbroken prairie. In i860 he came to 
Livingston county, where his father had jnir- 
cliased land, and he undertook the arduous 
task of opening up the farm, on which not 
a furrow had been turned nor an improve- 
ment made. For some time he operated a 
half-section of land and still owns one hun- 



dred and si.xty acres in the home place on 
section 10, Broughton township, and eighty 
acres on section 14, all of which has been 
under cultivation fur many years and is 
well imi)ro\ed. In connection with general 
farming he carries on stock raising and has 
made a decided success of his life work. 

October 16, i860. Mr. Lower married 
Miss Catherine Miller, a daughter of George 
and Margaret (Davis) Miller, natives of 
Germany and Pennsylvania, respectively. 
The Miller family made their home in Penn- 
sylvania until 1834, when the_\- came ti 1 Illi- 
nois and settled in Carroll comity, where the 
]jarents spent the remainder of their lives, 
the father dying in June, 1877, the mother in 
December, i8gi. They had thirteen chil- 
dren, of whom twii died in infancy. The 
others are still living, uameK' : Mar\- .\.. 
wife of C. v.. Cross, a veteran (if the ci\il 
war and a railroad engineer residing in 
Marion, biwa; Catherine, wife of our sub- 
ject, who was born .Vugust 7. 1842; Samuel 
E., a resident of Chenoa. Illinois; Emma 
R.. wife of Philip Galwicks, of Butler coun- 
t\'. .X'ebraska ; William .\., a hotelman of 
Streator; John L., of Beatrice, Nebraska; 
Martin 1... twin iirother of John L. and a 
resident of Mt. Carroll; Upton, a magnetic 
healer; Gertrude, wife of Edward Sullivan, 
of .Aurora; .\. L., a physician of Dixon; 
and Margaret, a resident of Rockford. The 
three \-omigest were biu'n in lllinnis. the 
others in Peimsylvania. 

Of the twelve children born to Mi", and 
Mrs. Lower three died in infancy. The 
others were as follows: ( i ) Maggie is the 
wife of Walter Morrison, a railroad man of 
Omaha. Nebraska, and they have four chil- 
dren : Clarence. Lillie, Eethel and Clara. 
(2) Augusta is the wife of P. D. (ilnver. 



214 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a farmer of Custer county, Nebraska, and 
they have seven cliildren : Earl, Fay, Guy. 
Ruth, Lloyd, Glenn and Rex. (3) Albert, 
who lives on his father's farm, is extensively 
engaged in general farming on a half -section 
of land and also carries on stock raising. 
He married Mary E. Lorigan, and has five 
children : Abram, Salisbury, Bernice. .\1- 
bert and ]\Iadeline. (4) Le Roy, a pros- 
perous farmer and stock raiser, operating a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Broughton township, married Hannah E. 
Morris and has two children, Arthur and an 
infant. (5) Frank D., also a farmer and 
stock raiser of Broughton township, married 
Mary E. \\'eller and has one daughter, 
Eulalia. (6) ^^Larriette is the wife of Cyrus 
Hiddleson, of Broughton township, and they 
have two children. Vera and George. (7) 
Lillian is a dressmaker residing at home. 
(8) Grace is the wife of Benjamin Morris, 
of Round Grove township, and they ha\e 
one daughter, Lila. {9) Gertrude is at 
home. 

In politics Mr. Lower is a stanch Dem- 
ocrat, and his fellow citizens, recognizing his 
worth and. ability, have often called him to 
office. He has served as supervisor fi\-€ 
vears, road commissioner seventeen years, 
and after assisting in organizing the school 
district in i860 was made one of the first 
directors, which office he held for fifteen 
vears. He assisted in layino- out all of the 
njads of Broughton township, and did not 
resign his [KJsition as commissioner until 
the last mile had been opened up. He is one 
of the best known men of his community, 
and that he has the entire confidence and 
respect of his fellow citizens is manifest by 
his being called upon to act as guardian for 
se\'eral children and as administrator of sev- 



eral estates, which were settled up most sat- 
isfactorily. Since 1894 he has lived a 
retired life u])<in his farm, surrounded by all 
the comforts which earnest toil in former 
vears have Ijrought him. 



ROBERT RUMBOLD. 

Robert Rumbold, who is engaged in the 
insurance business in Chatsworth, dates his 
residence in Livingston county from 1856, 
almost half a centur}'. He was born in 
Hampshire. England, July 23, 1831, and 
is a son of Joseph and Martha (Sherman) 
Rumbold, both of whom were also natives 
of England, the latter dying there about 
1845. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, three of whom died in infancy, while 
the family were yet residing in England, 
and three died after coming to the United 
States, so that our subject is the sole living 
representative of the family. Joseph Rum- 
bold became a veterinary surgeon in Eng- 
land, and followed that profession, in con- 
nection with farming, after coming to this 
country. Shortly after the death of his 
wife Joseph Rumbold, Sr., came with his 
family to the United States, and first lo- 
cated at Lock-port, Will county, Illinois, but 
shortly afterward moved to Livingston 
county and commenced farming near Fair- 
bury, an occupation in which he success- 
fully continued until his death, in 1868. 

Robert Rumbold, the subject of this 
sketch, received his education in the board- 
ing schools of his native country, and was 
twenty-one years old when he accompanied 
his father to the United States. On his ar- 
rival he engaged in farming, in connection 
with his father, and thev were extensively 




ROBERT RUMBOLD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



217 



enjjag^eii in tariiiiiig on rented land in Ken- 
ilall cnunty, until 1836. when they came to 
Livingston county. Our subject here i)ur- 
cliased an interest in a quarter section of 
land near Fairbury and was successfully en- 
gaged in farming there until iHfxj, when he 
dis[)ose(l of his interest in that farm and pur- 
chased eighty acres of his present farm in 
Chatsworth township, which was then un- 
improved prairie lantl. This he began to 
improve and soon had it all under cultiva- 
tion, and on that farm he has since contin- 
ued to reside. For some years he continued 
to superintend the work ot the farm, but has 
now given its management into the hands 
ot his son, who is a thorough and practical 
farmer. 

in 1859, after he had made a start in 
this new ccnuUr}', .Mr. Rumbold visited his 
nati\e laud, and while there was united in 
marriage with Miss Sarah Osmond, who 
was born, in 1830, in Hampshire, England. 
With his bride, he returned to his new 
home, since when he has been identified with 
the county in many ways. Se\en children 
came to bless their union, two of whom 
died in infancy. Of the five living chil- 
dren, Edward H. resides in West Pullman, 
where he is engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business, in which he is making 
i. success. He is married and lias unc 
daughter, Esther. Alice M. is the wife of 
Samuel M. Wilson, and they have one 
ilaughter, Edna. Their home is also in West 
Pullman, where he is assisting his brother- 
in-law in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness. .\nn Elizabeth is cashier for her 
brother in his ofifice at West Pullman. Cecil 
Robert is assisting his father in the insur- 
ance business in Chatsworth. Joseph B., 
who, after leaving school, engaged in teach- 
ing for one year, is now managing the farm 



of his father, and is doing a successful busi- 
ness. 

.Mr. Rumbold comnicnccd the insurance 
business in 18O9 and is now one of the old- 
est in point of service in this line of busi- 
ness of any in Livingston county. He has 
the agency of fourteen of the best tire and life 
insurance companies in the country, including 
the Aetna, of Hartford, Connecticut; Home, 
of Xew York; Continental, of New York; 
Insurance Company of North America, of 
Philadeli)hia : Underwriters, of Philadelphia; 
.\merican, of Philadelphia, and the Wash- 
iiigton Life Insurance Company. For the 
last twenty-five years, Mr. Rumbold has 
given bis entire time to the insurance busi- 
ness and has built up an excellent trade, 
ha\-ing many patrons, not only in Livings- 
ton, but in adjoining counties. He has 
made a success of the business and deserves 
all that he has made. 

Mr. Rumbold came to this country at 
a time when the slavery question was the 
all-absorbing topic of interest and he be- 
came a voter just about the time of the or- 
ganization of the Republican party. With 
that party he became identified and has since 
been an earnest advocate of its principles. 
While he has always manifested a com- 
mendable interest in the c[uestions of the 
day, he has never been a politician as the 
term is generally understood. By his friends, 
be has been elected and served as assessor 
of his township, collector, justice of the 
peace, and is now serving as trustee of 
schools. He has been a delegate to many 
county conventions, and also to the con- 
gressional convention of his party. He is 
a man ever ready to take his share of re- 
sponsibility and to advocate any good cause 
beneficial to the community in which he 
lives. 



2l8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Fraternally. ^Fr. Rumhokl is a Mas(in. 
first becoming identified with the t)rder 
while livingr in (irundy county. He is now 
a member of Chatsworth Lodge, No. 339. 
A. F. & A. M.: of Fairbury Chapter. Xo. 
()g, R. A. M.. and oi Fairbury Command- 
erv. No. 34. K. T. He is the only living 
charter member of the blue lodge in Fair- 
bury. In the ])rincii)les of the order he has 
ever had an abiding faith, believing them 
to be beneficial to mankind. On the occa- 
sion of Mr. Rumbold's" re-election for the 
twenty-first time as treasurer of the Chats- 
worth Lodge, he was presented with a beau- 
tiful gold headed cane bearing the inscrip- 
tion : 

"Presented December 16, 1S98, to 
Robert Rumbold at his twenty-first election 
as treasurer of Chatsworth Lodge, No. 539, 
A. F. & A. M." 

It is needless to say J\Ir. Rumliold \alues 
the gift very highly, not for its intrinsic 
\alue, but from the associations surrountl- 
ing the gift. Mr. Rumbold has passed 
through all the chairs of the lodge and is 
now hokling the office of worshipful master. 
Reared in the Episcopalian faith, he has al- 
ways adhered to the teachings of that de- 
nomination. As a citizen, no man in Li\- 
ingston county is held in higher esteem. 
Of a social nature, it is easy for him to make 
and retain friends. 



:^IICHAEL REISING. 

Michael Reising. engaged in the general 
mercantile business. Chatsworth. Illinois, is 
a natixe of Hanover. Bremen, Germany, 
and was born July 17, 1838. He is a son of 
George A. and Margaret ( Reising) Reis'ng. 



who, although of the same name, were not 
related. Both were natives of Bavaria. Ger- 
many, where they were married. By occu- 
pation Georp^e A. Re'sing was a farmer in 
his native land, a xncatum which he follmved 
throughout life. \\'ith a \'ew of bettering 
l;is Condition he left the old world, with his 
familv, when our subject was but a few 
weeks old. coming to the L'nited States and 
direct to Woodford coiuUy. Illinois. On his 
arrival in the latter cnuntx' he jjurchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, only 
one acre of which had been j)lowed. Clear- 
ing the land of its timber he commenced the 
improvement of the farm and later added to 
its area by the purchase of eiglity acres from 
the government and forty acres from an- 
other man. W'itli the exception of two years 
.spent in Peoria. IlHnois, he spent the re- 
mainder of his life on that farm, dying when 
sixtv-one years old. His wife died when 
she was fortv-seven vears old. They were 
the parents of six children that grew to ma- 
turity and two that died in early childhood. 
Those who grew to man and womanhood 
were Peter. Adam P.. Mary, iMichael. Eliz- 
abeth and Annie. All are yii li\ing save 
I"ilizabeth. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
h(;od on his father's farm in Woodford coim- 
t\-. Illinois, aiul as the opportunity was af- 
forded him attended the common suliscrip- 
tion school, having to walk a distance of 
two miles to the school house. He could 
onlv attend a few weeks in the winter, as 
his services were needetl on the farm at other 
times. He remained at home until he at- 
tained his majority, when he rented land 
and engaged in farming for himself. After 
the death of his father he went to Tazewell 
coimtv. where he rented a farm and engaged 
in its cultivation for two vears. bVom 



THE BIOGRArHICAL RECORD. 



219 



Tazewell he returned to Woodford county 
and hoiiijlit eighty acres of land near El 
I'aso. which he farmed for ahout three years. 
SelKng this place he moved to Claremont 
county. Ohio, where he remained for four 
years. He then returned to Woodford coun- 
ty. Illinois, and engaged in farming f »■ 
two years. We next came to Chatsworth. 
Illinois, and purchased the general store of 
Mrs. Barhara Scherer. and here he has since 
continued to reside. In 1883 Mr. Reising 
met with a serious misfortune that left h'm 
thirty-five hundred dollars worse than pemii- 
Ifss. hut with that sturdy determination that 
characterizes the German race he would not 
own that he was beaten, but jmshed forward 
ir the face of obstacles that wnuld have dis- 
mayed almost any other man, and by dint of 
hard work and perseverance succeeded in 
again establishing himself in business, .\fter 
a few years, however, seeing that he was 
paying out his pnjfits for rent, lie assumed 
fresh indebtedness and built the fine store 
building that he now owns. F"ew men could 
have accomplished what Mr. Reising has. 
being forced as he was to start over the bat- 
tle of life at almost fifty years of age. For 
the i)ast twenty years Mrs. Re'sing has been 
engaged in the millinery business in connec- 
tion. She has a good trade and gives sat- 
isfaction to her patrons. 

On the 24th of January, i860. Mr. Reis- 
ing was united in marriage with Miss Mar- 
garet FM'arr. a native of Claremont county, 
Ohio, and daughter of George I'farr. a na- 
tive of Germany, who came to this country 
when a young man, locating in Claremont 
county, and later moving to Woodford coun- 
tv. Illinois. Mrs. Reising is one of a family 
of si.x children, the others being Barbara. 
Mary. Peter, Kate and John. Of these Bar- 
bara and Peter are now deceased. Mr. and 



Mrs. Reising have no children of their own. 
but have an ado])ted .son, Joseph, who bears 
their name. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Reising are members of the 
Catholic church, and in politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat, having voted the party ticket since at- 
taining his majority. He has served sev- 
eral terms as a member of the village board 
of trustees of Chatsworth. but has no in- 
clination for office holding. He prefers to 
give his time and attention to his business 
and work for the interests of the people in 
selling them goods at living prices. He 
aims at all times to carry as complete a 
stock of goods as the wants of the commun- 
ity will warrant. His residence of twenty- 
seven years in Chatsworth has made him 
manv friends. 



RE\'. S.\MUEL ELBRIDGE \'AXXE. 

Rev. Samuel Elbridge Vance, who is now 
living a retired life in Pontiac. enjoying a 
well-earned rest, was for many years actively 
engaged in religious work as a Presbyterian 
minister. He was born in Paris, Edgar 
county, Illinois, July 29, 1835, a son of .An- 
drew Milton and Esther ( Shelledy ) Vance, 
who were married in that city, of which city 
iiis paternal grandfather, Samuel Vance, 
was a prominent pioneer. He was a native 
of Abingdon. Virginia, and on leaving that 
state removed to east Tennessee, but as 
earlv as 1822 he came to Illinois and took 
u]) his residence in Paris, erecting the sec- 
ond house in that place. There he engaged 
in farming throughout the remainder of his 
life, dying about 1857. at the age of eighty- 
five vears. He was an elder in the Presby- 
terian church of Paris for a great many 
vears, and donated all the brick for the first 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



church of that denomination erected there. 
He was a life-long Democrat, and in the 
south liad been a slave owner, but freed al^ 
his slaves on coming to this state. The fa- 
ther of our subject was born in \'irginia. 
in 1809. In 1826 he came to Illinois and 
followed merchandising in Paris through- 
out his active business life. He died there in 
1874, at the age of sixty-four years. He held 
some minor offices, but never sought political 
honors, and in politics was a Democrat until 
the organization of the Republican party, 
when he joined its ranks, becoming a stanch 
supporter of its principles. He, too, was an 
elder in the Presbyterian church for many 
years, and was a man honored and respected 
bv all who knew him. The mother of our 
subject died when he was only twelve years 
old, leaving three children, of whom he 
was the oldest. Julia married J. C. CoUom, 
a merchant of F'aris, and died leaving a 
family. James A., a resident of Pierce City, 
Missouri, was a soldier of the civil war 
and is an attorney by profession. He is 
married and has a family. 

Our subject remained at home until 
twenty vears of age, and was prepared for 
college at Edgar Academy, in Paris. Later 
he spent one year in Hanover College, In- 
diana, and then entered Jefferson College 
(now known as Washington and Jefferson 
College), Pennsylvania, where he pursued 
a literary course and was graduated in i860. 
He was next a student at the Northwestern 
Theological Seminary, Chicago, and was 
graduated at that institution in the spring 
of 1863. He was licensed and ordained by 
the Presbytery of Palestine, now known as 
the Presbytery of Mattoon, and his first 
charge was John Knox church, in Knox 
county, Illinois. At the same time he also 
preached in the village of Oneida, the same 



ctiunty. remaining there six years. Subse- 
(juently he was at Lexington, Illinois, for 
five and a half years, and from there went to 
Wisconsin, where he spent sixteen years in 
the work of the ministry. His health fail- 
ing him, he went to Kansas, where he re- 
mained some years, and in 1895 came to 
I'ontiac, Illinois, where she has since lead a 
retired life, having never recovered his usual 
health. 

On the 22(1 of December, 1863, at Mor- 
ris, Grundy county, Illinois, Mr. Vance was 
united in marriage with Miss Catherine 
Erame, a daughter of Rev. Reuben and Mar- 
garet Stewart (Selby) Erame, and grand- 
daughter of Captain Selby, who followed 
the sea throughout life. Eor many years 
her father was in charge of the Presby- 
terian church in Morris, but died in Chi- 
cago, in 1 89 1, at the age of eighty-seven 
years. His widow is still living in that 
city at the advanced age of ninety-two years, 
making her home with a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vance have a family of 
live children, three sons and two daughters, 
(i) Selby Erame, born in Knox county, 
November 17, 1864, was ordained a Pres- 
byterian minister and preached for some 
years, but is now professor of Greek at 
Wooster University, Ohio. He is married 
and has one child. (2) Harriet Shelledey, 
a native of Knox county, is a graduate of the 
classical department of Lake Forest Uni- 
versity, and once held a position in a young 
ladies" seminary, but for the past five years 
has been one of Pontiac"s best photog- 
raphers, having won special praise for her 
artistic work, especially of babies and chil- 
dren. She was the first to introduce the 
platinum finish in the city. (3) Edward 
Elbridge, a native of Illinois, is a Presby- 
terian minister of Cooksville, McLean coun- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ty, Illinois, and is now traveling in tlie west 
on account of ill health. (4) James Milton, 
born in Lexington, Illinois, is also a gradu- 
ate of Lake Poorest L'niversivty, and fnr 
three years taught Latin and Greek in the 
township high school of Pontiac, but is miw 
attending the Theological Seminar}' at 
Princeton, New Jersey, studying for the 
ministry. (5) Catherine Stewart, Ixnn in 
ortage county, Wisconsin, is now fourteen 
years of age and is attending the high school 
of Pontiac. 



GEORGE ERV. 

(jeorge Fry, the owner nf a good farm of 
eighty acres on section 29, I'orrest town- 
ship, Livingston county, is a native of Eng- 
land, born in dJevonshire, in 1834, and is 
a son of John Fry. He lost his mother 
when quite young, but his father, who was 
also a farmer by occupation, lived to the ad- 
\anced age of ninety-two years, and was 
still very active at the time of his death, 
having a short time before walked a dis- 
tance of nine miles and sheared forty sheep. 
Our subject is the youngest of a family of 
ten children, and he and his brother, Ricii- 
ard. were the only ones to come to this ci>un- 
irv. 

George Fry remained in his native land 
until seventeen years of age, when he crossed 
the ocean and settled in Lisbon, Kendall 
county, Illinois, where he worked on a 
farm and then oprated rented land for seevral 
years. In 1866 he became a resideiU of 
Livingston county, and after farming for si.K 
years in Belle Prairie townshi]), he came to 
I'orrest township and boui;ht the eighty- 
acre farm which has been his home ever 
since. He started out in life as a poor boy. 



but by industry and good management has 
secured a comfortable competence. 

Mr. Frve married Mrs. Susan Evans, 
also a native of England, who died nine 
months later, leaving one child, by her 
former marriage — William h'vans — now a 
resident of Kansas. Mr. Fry was again 
married at the end of four years, his second 
union being with Mrs. Susan Gas, of Penn- 
sylvaia, whose first husband was killed in 
the civil war. She is now seventy-seven 
ysar of age and although nearly blind and 
tpiite deaf, she bears up patiently under her 
afflictions. She and her husband have many 
warm friends and are highly resi)ected and 
esteemed bv all who know them. 



HXRV RIXGLER. 

Henry Ringler, a ])rominent business 
man of Strawn, Livingston county, Illinois, 
was born in the province of Hersfeld, Ger- 
many, June 16, 1844, a son of Peter and 
Gertrude (More) Ringler, who were of 
pure German ancestry. The mother died 
in that country at the age of thirty-eight 
years. She was the third wife of Peter 
Ringler and the mother of eight sons : Peter; 
George; one who died in infancy unnamed; 
Henry and John, twins; William; Fritz and 
August. With the exception of the one who 
died in infancy, all came to this country 
and fi\e are still living. It being the custom 
from time immemorial for the Kurfusten- 
tlnim Hessen to give the father of seven suc- 
cessive sons forty-two dollars, Mr. Ringler 
received that amount from Em])eror Will- 
iam, the grandfather of the present ruler of 
Germany. Of this family Fritz and August 
are residents of Xew York Citv, and com- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



posed the firm of F. A. Ringler & Company, 
who have the largest electrotype toiuKlry 
in the world, employing over one hundred 
and fifty hands, and are prominent business 
men of that city. Two years ago they cele- 
brated the twenty-fifth anniversary of the es- 
tablishment of their business, and at the 
World's Fair, in 1893, received the first 
prize for an engraving of Columbus dis- 
covering America. They came to the United 
States in 1867. George Ringler, another 
brother of our subject, emigrated to Amer- 
ica in 1858, and also located in New York 
City, where he was foreman of a brewery 
for some years, and then, in partnership 
with another gentleman, engaged in that 
business on his own account. The business 
established by him is still carried on under 
the firm name of George Ringler & Com- 
pany, its present officers being his son, Will- 
iam G. Ringler. president : George J. Jetter, 
vice-president: J. Edward Jetter, secretary 
and manager, and Henry Hachemeister, 
treasurer — one of the largest in New York 
City — and have a large and elegant office 
at the corner of Ninety-second and Third 
a\-enue. while their brewery is fitted up with 
the latest improved machinery and was one 
of the first to put in operation an ice plant. 
George Ringler died about ten years ago, 
leaving an estate valued at over one million 
dollars. He had two children : William G., 
mentioned above, and Rose, wife of George 
J. Jetter. 

In 1869 Peter Ringler. the father of our 
sul)ject, came to the Uniteil States, and after 
residing for a time in New York state, came 
to Livingston county, Illinois, locating in 
Belle Prairie township, where he engaged in 
farming, and also contracting and building 
for a time. He had previously done e.x- 
tensive business as a contractor and builder 



ol roads and railroads and accumulated a 
large fortune, which he lost through the 
schemes of a railroad company. He died 
in Belle Prairie township, in 1875, at the 
age of se\enty-two years, and was laid to 
rest in the cemetery at Fairbury. He was 
four times married, his last wife being Cath- 
erine Shirteruff. by whom he had four chil- 
dren : Peter, now a prosperous farmer of 
Iowa: Catherine, wife oi Conrad Heppe, a 
farmer of Chatsworth, Illinois: Anton, a 
farmer of Cullom. and Lizzie, wife of A. 
M. Marks, of New York City. 

Henry Ringler was educated in the 
schools of his native land, and later spent 
about five years in traveling. He worked 
for a year and a half at the blacksmith's 
trade in Germany, and after coming to this 
country followed the same occupation for 
several years. He crossed the broad At- 
lantic at the age of eighteen years, and in 
1866 became a resident of Livingston coun- 
ty. Illinois, locating first in Indian Gro\'e 
township, where he leased a farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres for six. years 
Later he rented a farm in Forrest township 
for four years, and at the end of that time 
came to Strawn, where he purchased prop- 
erty, embarking in the grocery business at 
that place in 1877, and carrying it on seven 
years. He then purchased a half-section of 
land on section 3. Fayette township, which 
he operated eleven years, and then sold, re- 
turning to Strawn to resume the grocery 
business, which he has since successfully car- 
ried on. He is one of the prosperous men 
of his community, whose success in life is 
due to his own unaided efforts, good man- 
agement and sound judgment. 

On the 1st of March, 1868, in Belle 
Prairie township, Mr. Ringler was united 
in marriage with Miss Catherine Fox, also 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



223 



a native of (ierinany. and a daugliter of 
Jacob and Elizalieth (Fry) Vox. who emi- 
grated to America about 1866, and lived in 
Cliicago until 1870. Tbeir last years were 
spent witli oiu' suliject in Livingston cnun- 
ty, where tiie mother died in 187 J. the fa- 
ther in 187S. leaving a large family of chii- 
<lren. To Mr. and .Mrs. Ringler were burn 
eight children, all of whom are slill living. 
namely: ( i ) Fritz, who is now foreman of 
iiis uncle's electrotype foundry, in Xew 
York, and commanding a high salary, mar- 
ried Lizzie Shutt, and had one child that 
tlied in infancy. ( j ) Lizzie is the wife of 
Thomas Dolan. secretary of the Western 
L nion Newspaper C(iin])any. nf Denver. Col- 
orado, and they have twn children, \irgil 
and Gertrude. ( 3 ) .\ugusl, a successful 
contractor and builder of Strawn, married 
Rosa Kuntz. ancl they have four children, 
Raymond, Dora, Ellen and August. (4) 
Mary is the wife of D. F. Keller, a printer, 
of Chicago, and they have one child, \'ert>n- 
ica. ( 5 ) Henry married Hermine Bousand 
and is engaged in the saloon business in 
I'ontiac. (6) George is engaged in the 
brewery business in Hrookyln, Xew York. 
( 7 ) Katie it at home, and ( 8 ) William, also 
ai home, is clerking in his father's store. 
All (if the chililren were born in Livingston 
County, and educated in the townshi]) 
schools. 

As one <if the leading business men and 
ir.tluential citizens of Strawn, .Mr. Ringler 
lias been called upon to fill several imixirtant 
official positions, the duties of which he has 
always faithfully and satisfactorily ])er- 
formed. lie was supervisor of b'ayette 
township foiu" vears : school director, ten 
years; a member of the town board a num- 
ber of years, and is at present police magis- 
trate of the village, being elected in the 



spring of i()(")o. In politics he is intle- 
jiendent, voting for the man and not the 
party, and in his religious connections he 
and his familv are members of the Reformed 
Lutheran church, l-'or thirteen vears he 
was a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, but recently withdrew from the 
order, though he still holds membership in 
Sibley Lodge. Xo. j()i. !•". cV A. M. I'ro- 
gressive and [jublic spirited, he takes a deep 
interest in i)ublic affairs, and is justly num- 
bered among the valued citizens of his town 
and countv. 



REV. j.V.MES j. (Jl"L\X. 

Rev. James J. Ouinn, resident pastor of 
St. J(^hn's Catholic church, of Chatsworth, 
\v as born in Tolono, Chami)aign county, Illi- 
nois, May 16, 1857. and is the second chilil 
of Patrick j. and Margaret (Doheney) 
(Juinn, both of whom were natives of coun- 
ty Tijjperary, Irelantl, and came to the 
United States when young. For several 
years the father was successfully engaged in 
the mercantile business in .Xew N'ork. and 
while a resident of that city was married, 
a't St. Peter's Catholic church, ami llarclay 
street. June 1 1. 1854. Shortly afterward he 
came to Illinois and located in Tolono. where 
he opened a general store, being one of the 
first merchants of that village. While liv- 
ing there he assisted in building the Catho- 
lic church and in securing twenty-two acres 
of land adjoining for church use. Since 
1883 he has lived a retired life, and has 
made his home in Danville the last few 
years. In his family were si.x children, four 
.sons and two daughters, but the daughters 
are both deceased, and I'Vank, a successful 
physician and surgeon, of Peoria, died in 



224 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1896. Of those living, James J. is the old- 
est. John P. is now pastor of St. John's 
Catholic church of Peoria, where he has be- 
come prominent as a snccessfnl organizer 
and builder of churches. Joseph W. is 
station agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee 
&• St. Paul Railroad at Milwaukee. The 
sons were all graduated at Xotre Dame, 
('ollege. Indiana. 

Father Quinn. of this review, remained 
at home until fifteen years of age attending 
the public schools and worked with his fa- 
ther in the mercantile business. He also 
spent two years with a large wholesale firm 
in Chicago. At the age of seventeen he en- 
tered Notre Dame College, where he was 
graduated in law in 1878. and in the clas- 
sical course in 187Q. For one vear he en- 
gaged in the practice of law, and then en- 
tered the Theological Semilary, where he 
was ordained to the priesthood by Cardinal 
Gibbons, in 1882, The following year he 
served as secretary to Bishop Spalding of 
Peoria, and in 1884 as assistant to Rev. T. 
S. Ketling of Champaign. From 1884 to 
1887 he was assistant to Rev. W'eldon. of 
Holy Trinity church, Bloomington, and dur- 
ing this time aided in building -several 
churches, being especially (|ualified for that 
Avork by the business training he had re- 
ceived. From 1887 to 1889 he was pastor 
of the churches at Chebanse and Clifton, 
Iroquois countv, and the churches at both 
places were built under his pastorate. In 
1889 he was given his present charge in 
Chatsworth, and there again his business 
ability has been called into play. He pur- 
chased property and erected a modern brick 
edifice, also a parsonage and academy, which 
are now valuetl at o\-er sixty thousand dol- 
lars. The church is a model affair, being 
the most substantial and beautiful, as well 



as valuable property, in the Peoria diocese. 
The furnishings were all imported and the 
\ery best obtainable. 

The school organized bv Father Uuinn 
is one of the best in the county, is supported 
by money collected irom the i)arishioners, 
and is open to the children of the town and 
county, while the teachers are among the 
l)est in this countrv, all talentetl ladies of the 
Order of Sisters of the Holy Cross of Notre 
Dame. Father Quinn began work on the 
church in 1889, and in 1894 the debt was 
lifted through his skillful management. He 
also erected the church at Forrest, which 
property is valued at twenty-five hundred 
dollars, and in eight months it was dedi- 
cated and free from indebtedness. He is 
ri;\ered l)y all his people and is their chosen 
leader. Through his early experiences and 
business education he has acijuired a knowl- 
edge which is invaluable to him as a pastor, 
bringing him in touch with his congrega- 
tion, of whom he has the entire confidence. 
He is also one to whom the town owes much 
of its advancement, both in business and 
social life, and his advice is sought by all 
who know him, both Protestants and Catho- 
lics. His familiarity with the law and busi- 
ness affairs gives him a decided advantage, 
and he interests himself in any enterprise 
which he believes will benefit the jjcople of 
his town or countv. 



JOHN A. PETTETT. 

John A. Pettett, a well-known postal 
clerk in charpe of the sixth division on the 
Chicago & Alton Railroad, from Chicago to 
St. Louis, and a prominent citizen of 
Dwight, Illinois, who has always been es- 
peciallv acti\e and jirominent in fraternal 




J. A. PETTETT. 




MISS MATILDA F. PETTETT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



229 



societies, was born in Hastings, Sussex, 
I'lngland, December 20, 1846, and is a son of 
Hein'v and Mary .Vnn (Standin) Pettett, 
representatives of old EngHsb families. On 
crossing' tlie Atlantic, the jjarents first 
located in Canada, but after a sh(M-t time 
spent there, they went to Tonica, Illinois, 
and from there came to Dwight, where the 
father followed his trade of mason until 
called to his final rest, February 2, 1 892. 
Jn politics he was a Republican and in re- 
ligious belief a Methodist. His wife died 
January 26, 1892. To this worthy couple 
were born se\en children, three of wluMn 
died in England during childhood. The 
others are (ieorge T., a resident of Dwight : 
John .\., our subject; Henry S., who is 
living a retired life in Lacon, Illinois, and 
Howard C, Republican nominee for states 
attorney of Peoria county, Illinois, in 1900, 
antl a resident of Chillicothe. 

The boyhood and youth of our subject 
were passed under the parental roof, and 
his education was obtained in the common 
schools. At the age of thirteen he worked 
in a tailor's shop in his native town of 
Hastings, and followed that occupation until 
coming to America, in 1868. Before leav- 
ing England he was married, in October, 
1865, to Miss Fannie I-'recnian, a native of 
Biddenden, England, and a daughter of 
James Freeman. By this union were horn 
four children, namely: Matilda F., her fa- 
ther's faithful and efficient housekeeper; 
Henry J., who married Xellie Lutz, and is 
now an employee of the Santa l'"e Rail- 
road, residing in Streator, Illinois; (Ieorge 
T.. who is engaged in the InUcher and mar- 
ket business in Kingfisher, Oklahoma, and 
Alice E., who died at the age of two and a 
half years. 

Coming to the United .States in iSdS, 



Mr. Pettett located in Tonica, Illinois. He 
concluded to try some em])loynient which 
would give him more outdoor exercise than 
his trade, and being willing to accept and hon- 
est and honorable work, he tocik that which 
was most available, and for some vears was 
engaged in farm labor, which he found, 
when i)ursued on the hustling, hurrving 
[dan of the Illinois farmer, to jiresent (|uite 
a Contrast to his previous sedeiUary occupa- 
tion. On the 20th of March, 1870, he came 
to Dwight and entered the service of the 
Chicago & .\lton Railroad, being employed 
for ;il)out ten years in \arious capacities 
in the round house and as fireman on the 
road. In 1880 he entered the general bag- 
gage otifice of the same road at Chicago, 
where he spent two years, and in 1882 was 
appointed railway postal clerk from Chicago 
to Peoria, but after a few weeks was trans- 
ferred to the Chicago and St. Louis run 
in the sixth division, which position he has 
faithfully and efficiently filled for eighteen 
years. J'"or sexeral years past he has served 
as clerk in charge of the force on this di- 
\ision, which is com])osed of three men Jie- 
sides himself. This dixision is one of the 
most imporl.mt in the state, being between 
the two principal cities of the .Mississii)pi 
valley. 

The greatest misfortune that lias be- 
fallen Mr. Pettett was the fleath of his wife, 
who was to him a faithful companion and 
helpmeet and was beloved by all who knew 
her. She passed away September 19, 1874, 
and his ])arents then made their home with 
him until they, too, were called to their final 
rest. ]'"or three years he has now been a 
resident of Dwight and is numbered among 
its honored and highly respected citizens. 
His present responsible position indicates 
the character of his .service and its apprecia- 



!30 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tion Ijv tliose cner him. His exacting du- 
ties have always i)revente(l him fmm taking 
any active part in nolitical affairs, and al- 
thdugli lie is an uncompromising siippt)rter 
of ReiHihlican principles and a worker in the 
ranks of his party, he has never aspired 
to political honors. The only public office 
he has ever accepted has been in connectidu 
with educational work as a member of the 
school board, and he resigned that position 
after serving five years. He is a member 
of the Hamilton Republican Club, of Chi- 
cago, and is an active and official member 
of the Methodist E])iscopal church, of 
Dwight. 

It IS in social and fraternal matters that 
Mr. Pettett is Ijest known to the public, hav- 
ing always taken an active part in such work. 
He is a thirty-second-degree Mason, a mem- 
ber of Livingston Lodge, No. 371. F. & 
A. M.. of Dwight; Wilmington Chapter, 
No. 142, R. A. ;\I.; St. Bernard Command- 
ery. No. 35, K. T.. in which he has served 
as commissary and quartermaster; Chicago 
Council, No. 4, R. & S. M. ; Oriental Con- 
sistory, of Chicago, and Medinah Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member 
of the St. Bernard Drill Corps, which is 
conceded to be the best in the United States 
and has wt)n many honors in competitixe 
exemplification of the work, antl in 189 1 
he organized Dwight Chapter, No. j66, O. 
E. S., of which both he and his daughter 
are charter members, and take an acti\e 
part in its work. He first joined Blooming- 
ton Chapter, No. 50, but on account of dis- 
tance and inconveniences, he set on foot 
measures which resulted in the organiza- 
tion of Dwight Chapter, with himself as 
wt)rthy patron. In this, as in other fra- 
ternity work, Mr. Pettett has taken much 
pains and is given high praise by the 



founder of the floral work of the order, 
tor his inimitable manner of exemplifying 
the work. His daughter is at present hold- 
ing the office of worthy matron, antl like her 
father takes a deep interest in the order, 
as well as in other society and church work. 
Both are charter members of Prairie Queen 
Chapter, No. 370, Daughters of Rebecca, 
and she has twice served as presiding officer 
and as representative to the grand lodge. 
Mr. Pettett is a prominent member of 
Dwight Lodge, No. 513, I. O. O. F., of 
which he is past noble grand, and is also 
past chief patriarch of Pacific Encampment, 
No. 126. He is a charter member of 
Hebron Lodge, No. 175, K. P., of Dwight, 
and for twenty years has been a member of 
the Independent Order of Mutual Aid. He 
is the organizer of Pettett Lodge, No. 347, 
A. O. U. W'., of Dwight, which was named 
i:i his honor. He was elected the first 
master xvorkman at its organizatit)n, in 
March, 1888, and since then has served con- 
tinuously as deputy grand master and rev)- 
resentative to the grand lodge. In the work 
of all these orders he has taken an active 
and prominent part and stands deservedly 
high in the esteem of his fraternal brethren. 
Probably no man in the state is better or 
more fa\-oral)ly known in fraternal circles 
than he, and he is also numberetl among 
the representative citizens of Dwight — one 
whose genial, cordial nature has made him 
hosts of friends. 



JOSEPH S. FRANCIS. 

One of the most straightforward, ener- 
getic and successful business men of Liv- 
ingston county is Joseph S. Francis, who is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



23' 



now ])n)niinently and actixely cnnnected 
witli the commercial iiuerests of Forrest. 
In the field of husiness opportunity is un- 
limited. Military and ])olitical life have 
high honors for hut few. hut in tlie field of 
trade the possibilities are many, and tlie am- 
bitious, energetic and determined man ma\ 
work his way steadily upwaid, attaining a 
position of affluance and prominence that 
camniands the respect and admiration of all. 
This Mr. Francis has won. and the salient 
features in his success are indefatigalile 
energy, unt.'ring labor and sound bu.siness 
judgment. 

He was horn in Jackson township. 
Brown count}-. Ohio. August iC), 1845. '^ 
son of John and Margaret ( Ross) h'rancis. 
The father was horn in county Ca\an, Ire- 
land, in F'ebruary. 1H12. and when five years 
of age came to the United States in com- 
pany with his father. Edward FVancis, who 
brought his family to this country. The 
grandfather of our .subject was born in Scot- 
land and on account of the feudal wars went 
to England, where he married. He after- 
ward removed to the luncrald Isle, where 
he carried on farming. On crossing the 
Atlantic he located in Brown county. Ohio. 
where he purchased a farm at a place called 
Ash Ridge. There he built a good home and 
became one of the leading residents of the 
community. He belongetl to the Presby- 
terian church and died in that faith in 1852. 

John F"rancis was one of a familv of four 
sons and three daughters. He was reared 
in Brown county. Ohio, there learned the 
coo])er's trade, and after his marriage also 
engaged in farming, making his home in 
Ohio until i860. In early life he joined the 
Methodist Episcojjal church and became one 
of the leading members of his congrega- 
tion — the Mount Olivet church. The house 



of worship was located on his farm. He 
ser\eil as class-leader and steward and his 
home was always the place of entertainment 
for the ministers who visited in that locahty. 
.Ml of his seven children were also mem- 
bers of ih.it church. In his farming opera- 
tions he was also very successful. He was 
also recognized as one of the public-spirited 
men of the community, held a number of 
offices, including those of school tlirector 
and supervisor, and faithfuhy discharged 
every trust reposed in him. On the 16th 
of .\ugusi. i8_^7, he married Miss Margaret 
Ross, a nati\e of Ohio and a daughter of 
Lazarus Ross, who was born in X'irginia 
and at one time was engaged in packing 
salt across the mountains to Cincinnati, 
where he traded it to tiie settlers. He finally 
located in Claremont comity. Ohio, where 
his daughter Margaret was horn. Subse- 
(|uently he moved to Brown county, Ohio, 
and lived with his children for some time, 
hut his death occurred in (irant county. In 
(liana. 

.Ml of the children of Jdjni and Miu"- 
garet brancis were born in Brown county. 
( Jliio. and in i860 the family removed thence 
to Illinois, the father purchasing two hun- 
ilred and forty acres of laiul adj(jining the 
town of I'orrest on tlie south. I lis pioneer 
home was only ij.\i4 feel, but as time 
pased he made many sul)stantial improve- 
ments on his place, erected a more commo- 
dious residence, and. by additional pu'"- 
chase. extended the boundaries of his farm. 
When he came to the county there were but 
five or six members of the Methodist Epis- 
a>\rd\ church in tlie locality. He at once 
identified himself with the earnest little band 
of Christians, was one of the most liberal 
contributors toward the building of the new 
house of worship and was o-ie of the four 



232 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



who guaranteed t'^e payment f,>r the huild 
iug (it ;he chLiroh. His contrihutions to the 
Avtjrk amounted to three thousand dollars. 
He ser\-ed as class leader and steward and 
did all in his power to promote the growth 
«)f the church. For several years prior to 
his death he li\-ed in town and devoted most 
of his time to church work. He was one 
of the first justices of the peace of his neigh- 
horhood. elected in 1861, and in that office 
he served through the exciting period of the 
war. He was also school treasurer for sev- 
eral years, and held that office at the time 
of the erection of the new building. He 
died September 5, 1893, respected by all who 
knew him. His widow, who was born 
January 14, 1814, still survives. They had 
five sons and two daughters, all of whom 
are lixing, namely: James G., now of Fair- 
hury : Edward R.. of Forrest; \\'illiam W'., 
of Monticello, Indiana; J. S., of this re- 
\iew : Albert, who is living on the old home- 
stead ; Emma J., now the wife of H. B. 
Watson, of Forrest ; and Lydia F., wife of 
Xathan Hurt, of Oakland, California. 

Mr. Francis, whose name introduces this 
review, began his education in Ohio. He 
worked on the home farm through the sum- 
mer months and in the winter attended the 
<listrict schools. \\'ith his parents he came 
to Livingston count}- in i860, and in 1864, 
at the age of nineteen, he enlisted in Com- 
pany E. One Hundred and Twenty-ninth 
Illinois Infantry. He was sent to Chatta- 
noga and joined his regiment at Atlanta, 
just before Sherman started on the march to 
the sea. He took part in that celebrated 
movement, participated in all the engage- 
ments of that campaign and was in the 
(jrand Rex'iew at Washington. He was dis- 
charged from Company E and assigned to 
the Forty fifth Illinois Regiment, sent to 



Springfield, and was there paid off anil dis- 
charged, in June, 1865.' 

For two years thereafter iNIr. Francis 
remained on the home farm. In 1869 he 
came to Forrest and was employed as a clerk 
in a general store until 1871, when he began 
dealing in general merchandise on his own 
account, continuing in the business until 
1876, when he returned to the farm. He 
then engaged in agricultural pursuits, and 
in connection with his lirother Albert he es- 
tablished the first tile factor)- in this part of 
the state, continuing its operation with 
marked success until the fall of 1885, when 
he sold his interest to his brother and came 
to Forrest. Here he began dealing in coal 
and feed at his present location. He soon 
seciu'ed a large trade, and in 1892 he e.x- 
tended the held of his operations by pur- 
chasing a half interest in a grain warehouse 
and elevator. He began buying and ship- 
ping grain, carrying on a verv extensive 
business, with Chicago as his market. He 
afterward became sole proprietor of the en- 
terprise, which he carried on very prosper- 
ously until April, 1900, when he sold out. 
He still deals in coal, feed and stone and 
takes contracts for stone work and building. 
His business interests are always carefully 
directed, and his sound judgment and un- 
faltering energy ha\-e enabled him to work 
his way continuously upward. For seven 
or eight years he has been a director in the 
Building & Loan Association of Forrest. 

On the 16th of August, 1881, Mr. Fran- 
cis was united in marriage to Miss Ella S. 
Williamson, a daughter of William J. and 
Xancy (Snedeker) Williamson. Her father 
was from Russellville, Brown county, Ohio, 
where he spent his entire life, engaged in 
farming. Both he and his wife were very 
earnest and ardent members of the Presby- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



233 



terian clnircli of Russellvilie. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Francis liave been born nine cliildren, 
seven of wliom are livinsj : Luln \\ .. 15erth:i 
J.. Xancv M.. Mary E.. Josie. La\\ rence 1). 
and Morris L. l lie two deceased were 
Walter, who died at the age of fonr years; 
and Homer, who died when two montlis old. 
Tiiey have a beautiful three-story brick resi- 
dence in Forrest — tlie first brick house in 
the city, anil the household is noted for its 
charming hospitality. 

His fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and ability, have frequently called 
upon Mr. Francis to serve in positions of 
jiublic trust. He served as highway com- 
missioner from 1884 until 1898, during 
which time all of the iron and steel bridges 
of the township were built. He was a mem- 
ber of the board of education three terms 
and was on the building committee when the 
school-house was enlarged. He and his 
wife are members of the Congregational 
church, and he also served on its building 
committee at the time of the erection of its 
house of worship. He has twice served as 
sui)erintendent of the Sunday-school and 
has always taken an active part in the work 
of .the church, contributing most liberally 
to its support, lie belongs to Forrest Post, 
\o. 114, (]. A. R., has several times been its 
ctimmander and has been its representative 
U> encampments. He is a charter member 
of the Modern Woodmen Camp at Forrest, 
has six times been its principal ofificer and 
has twice been delegate to the grand lodge. 
As has been indicated in this sketch, Mr. 
Francis is a prominent factor in business, 
social and political life in Forrest. He 
withholds his support from no movement 
or measure calculated to prove of public 
good, and is indeed a public-spirited and 
valued citizen; in business his word is as 



good as any bon<l that was ever solemnized 
by signature or seal; and in private life he 
has an unassailable reputation, which com- 
mands the respect and has won him the con- 
htlence of all. 



WILLIAM LARGE. 

William Large, a representative farmer 
of Pleasant township, Livingston county, 
who owns a good farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres on section 14, was born in 
England, March 15, 1856, and when a year 
and a half old was brought to America by 
his parents, Leonard and Sarah (Mitchell) 
Large. The family first located in W'ood- 
ford count}', illinc^is, where the father pur- 
chased land and engaged in farming for a 
time, but about 1873 sold that property and 
bought eight)' acres of land in Pleasant 
Ridge township, Livingston county, south 
of our subject's present farm. He im- 
proved that place and made his home there 
until death. There the mother is still living 
at the age of seventy. 

1 he greater part of the education of our 
subject was ac(|uired in the public schools 
of Woodford county, though after coming 
to Livingston county he atended school 
for four or five winters, his advantages 
along that line being beter than the aver- 
age boy of that time. When not in school 
he assisted in the work of the farm, and at 
the age of twenty-one commenced operating 
a farm on his own account, meeting with 
success from the start. Prior to his mar- 
riage he purchased his present place, which 
at that time was only partially improved. 
He has since built a good house and barn, 
set out trees and placed the land under a 
high state of cultivation. In connection' 



234 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



with general farming he is engaged in stock 
raising, making a specialty of hogs. Besides 
his property here, he owns land in White and 
Jasper counties. Indiana, wh.'ch he has im- 
])r()\ed. and he is acknowledged as one of 
the most successful farmers of the county. 
On the 20th of September, 1881, Mr. 
Large married Miss Clara Sutton, a daugh- 
ter i)f J. B. Sutton, whose sketch appears on 
another page of this volume. She died 
July 3. 1893, leaving four children: Maude, 
Dw.ght, Marion and Ethel, who have been 
given good school advantages and are still at 
home. Mr. Large is an active member and 
liberal supporter of the Methodist Episco- 
pal churcli. of which his wife was also a 
member. He is alst) connectetl with the 
Court of Honor and affiliates with the Re- 
publican party. \\'here\er known he is held 
in high regard and his friends are many 
throughout the count\'. 



GEORGE W . McCABE. 

George W. McCabe, tiie leading Ijanker 
of Chatsworth antl one of the representa- 
tive business men of Li\ingston county, is 
a native of Illinois, born in Brimtield, Peoria 
county, March i, 1863. His father, Pat- 
rick McCabe, was a native of Ireland, and 
in 1845 came to the United States, landing 
in New Orleans. During this time he en- 
listed and served aboiu eighteen months in 
tlie Mexican war. He settled in Peoria 
county, Illinois, three x'ears later, but in Xew 
Orleans he was married, in 1850, to Cath- 
erine F(l^, who was also born in Ireland 
and came to America about the same time as 
her husband. Since his marriage he has 
made his home permanenty in this state. 



and until 1894 carried on farming very suc- 
cessfully, though devoting most of his time 
to the stock business. He came to this 
ct)untry with the hope of securing a home, 
and w:th the characterist.c energy of his 
race he succeeded far beyond his expecta- 
tions, and was the owner of a well- 
improved farm of two hundred and forty 
acres in Peoria county. In 1894 he re- 
tired from acti\"e labor and moved to the 
city of Peoria, where he purchased a com- 
fortable home and resided there until his 
death, August 14, 1900, at the age of sev- 
enty-eight years. HiS widow survives him, 
being se\'enty-one vears of age. To this 
worth}- coupie were born eight children, of 
whom fi\'e are st.ll living, namely: Alice 
is now the widow of J. McClary, of Chicago. 
Edward D., a graduate of the Michigan 
L'ni\ersity at Ann .Arbor, and now a promi- 
nent attorneys of Peoria, has been success- 
full\' engaged in practice for several years 
and is one of the best probate and chancery 
attorneys in the city. He served four years 
under President Cleveland as government 
storekeeper at Peoria. Elisha B. follows 
farming on the old home place in Peoria 
county. George \\'., our subject, is next 
in order of birth. Kate E. is at home with 
her parents in Peoria. 

'1 he early education of George W. Mc- 
Cal)e was acquired in the common schools 
of Brimfield, and he later took a commer- 
cial course at St. Viatur's College at Kan- 
kakee, and a business course at Bryant & 
Stratton"s College, in Chicago. During the 
vear of 1892 he read law with his brother 
in Peoria, but the following year came to 
Chatsworth and purchased a lot, upon which 
he erected a modern fire-proof bank building, 
beginning work in April and opening for 
business in October of that year. Almost 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



235 



immetliatcly he secured a liberal patronage, 
and is nnw dning the leading general hank- 
ing business nf the community, having as his 
assistant H. S. Cowling, a jjrominent young 
man of Chatsworth. He is enterprising, 
energetic and progressive and has conducted 
the business for seven years w ithout the loss 
of a dollar. He is also (juite extensively 
interested in real estate and loans, and is 
president of the Peoria & ICastern Telephone 
Ciim])any. a growing concern, having sev- 
eral exchanges in the system. In iHqj Mr. 
McCahe purchased a l<it at the corner of 
Fourth and Hickory streets and erected a 
modern residence, fitted with all improve- 
ments, and one of the handsomest and most 
con\enient houses in Chatsworth. On the 
jd of -August, 1900, was incorporated the 
Com'mercial National Bank of Chatsworth. 
with capital stuck amounting to twenty-tive 
thou.sand dollars. i>\ which amount Mr. Mc- 
Cabe took nineteen thousand dollars. To the 
new institution he turned over the entire as- 
sets of his private bank, and it w ;is mainly 
through his efforts that the bank was organ- 
ized. Believing that a National bank afforded 
more security to the depositors of the bank, 
and would the lietter secure the confidence of 
the community, he undertook the wf)rl; cf or- 
ganization and incorporation. This new in- 
stitution w'ill afford to the citizens of Chats- 
worthand vicinity every facility for safe 
banking, and under the general management 
of Mr. McCabe it will secure the confidence 
of the community, as he occupies the po- 
sition of cashier anil general manager. The 
other officers of the bank are Stei)hen Herr. 
j)resi(lent; John F. Ryan, \ice-])resident ; 
and H. S. Cowling, assistant cashier. 

On the jcjth nf September. 1897. Mr. 
Cabe married Miss Thresa M. Kehoe. a na- 
tive of Chicago, of which city her father has 



been a ])rogressive merchant for several 

vears. I'v this uninn have been Imrn two 
children: Katherine (i. and (ieorge K. In 
polit cs Mr. McCabe is a Democrat '<n na- 
tional issues, but in local affairs always sup- 
ports the men best iiualified to fill the offices 
regardless of party lines. He is a member 
of the State Rankers" .\ssociation of Illinois, 
and fur ci\er six years has been a member 
of the Knights of Pythias Lodge of Chats- 
worth. in which he has held the office of 
chancellor commander fur some time. Re- 
ligious] v he is :i member of Sts. I'eter's and 
Paul's Catholic church. In manner he is 
l)leasant and genial, and is (juite ])opular both 
in social and business circles. 



JOHN' w. i-]:llo\vs. 

John W. b'ellows. one nf the oldest resi- 
dents of Pleasant Ridge township, Livings- 
ton county. Illinois, was born in Otisco, 
Onondaga county. Xew ^■ork, September 
13, i8jo, a son of Daniel and Jerusha ( Ful- 
ler) I'elhjws. The father was a native of 
(ierman\- and a farmer by occupation. In 
the ciiunty nf his nati\ity nur subject was 
reared and educated in much the usual man- 
ner of farmer boys of his day. 

There Mr. I'ellows was married. Oc- 
tober _'o. 184^1. to Miss Margaret M. Len- 
son. who was born September 5. 1828. Her 
father, Nicholas Lenson, was also a native 
(■f (iermany, and on his emigration to the 
L'nited States settled in Tully townshi]), 
Onondaga county. New York. Mr. and Mrs. 
I'ellows have four children living, nanielv: 
lames II.. a wholesale dealer and manu- 
facturer of cand\- in Kankakee. Illinois; 
Stephen, resident of Watseka; Daniel D., of 



23*5 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Wing, and Alfred W'.. who weddeil Mary 
Tobenski and li\es at liume with his parents. 
Nicholas A. went south as a foreman in 
1869 and is supposed to have died of yellow 
fever, and J. Henry died in W^ing, Illinois, 
at the age of forty-two years, leaving five 
children. 

After theif marriage Mr. and Mrs. Fel- 
lows continued their residence in New York 
until 1852, when they started west. They 
made the journey by boat from Bufifalo to 
Chicago, where they arrived on the 2d of 
November, that year, when that city was 
(|uite small, and then drove across the coun- 
try with a team to Plainfield, Will county, 
Illinois, where Mr. Fellows engaged in farm- 
ing upon rented land for seven years. The 
following two years were spent in McLean 
county. Determined to have a home, Mrs. 
Fellows worked hard until she had earned 
enough to purchase eightv acres of land in 
Pleasant Ridge township, Livingston coun- 
ty, to which she still holds the deed. The 
family located here in 1862, and the logs for 
their first home were hauled from Avoca. 
In 1 78 1 a good frame residence was built 
and is still the home of the family. Mr. 
Fellows purchased eighty acres of land ad- 
joining his wife "^property, has tiled the en- 
tire amount and placed it under a high state 
«if cultivation. They have planted shade 
trees and converted the place into a pleasant 
home. He has always engaged in general 
farming and has been quite successful. Al- 
tliough he has never taken a very active 
part in public affairs, he has served as school 
director and takes an active interest in all 
enterprises for the public good. 

Since the age of twelve years Mrs. Fel- 
lows has been an earnest and consistent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
has been a subscriber to the Christian Advo- 



cate since the first number of that paper 
was issued. She is quite fond of reading 
and is a most estimable lady. She and her 
luisband have watched with interest the won- 
derful changes that have taken place in this 
region since locating here, have seen the 
wolves, deer and wild turkeys disappear, 
the railroad, telegraphs and telephones in- 
troduced, and towns and villages spring up. 



0\VEX MURTAUGH. 

Owen Murtaugh, an honored and highly 
respected citizen of Chatsworth, is the pos- 
sessor of a handsome propert}- which now 
enables him to spend his declining years in 
the pleasurable enjoyment of his accumula- 
tions. The record of his life, jjrevious to 
1890, is that of an active, energetic, meth- 
odical and sagacious business man, who bent 
his energies to the honorable accpirement 
of a comfortable competence for himself and 
family. 

Mr. Murtaugh was born in county 
Louth, Ireland, June 8, 1826, and belongs to 
a race of people who have been renowned 
for their energy and willingness to brave 
any danger that they may better themselves. 
He received his education in the common 
schools of his native land and remained in 
Ireland until twenty-six years of age, when 
he resolved to try his fortunes on this side 
of the Atlantic. Coming to what was then 
considered the far west, he located in Bing- 
hamton, now Aniboy, Lee county, Illinois, 
befnre the Illinois Central Railroad had been 
surveyed. He purchased eighty acres of 
raw prairie land near Sublette, that county, 
which he partly improved and then disposed 
of at a profit. He had previously worked as 




OWEN MURTAUGH. 





E '^^^^H 







REV. WILLIAM M. MURTAUGH. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



241 



a farm hand for some time, and with tiie 
money tlius obtained he purchaseil that prop- 
erty. Eater lie purcha.sed a tract oi nuim- 
proxcd land in Marshall county, where he 
made his home for .some time. 

While residing there, Mr. Murtangh was 
married, in 1855. t" Miss Bridget Lawless, 
also a native of Ireland, and an only daugh- 
ter, who came to America with her parents 
in 1849. ''"'1 <l'cd in i8()4. By this union 
were horn two s(_)ns : William Matthew, 
horn in i860, took a business course at St. 
\'iateur"s College, in Kankakee, and began 
studying for the priesthood at Watertown, 
Wisconsin, where he remained three years. 
Later he attendeil school in Montreal, Can- 
ada, for a year, and was graduated from St. 
Mar)"s in P>altimore, ^larylainl, being or- 
tlained to the priesthood at Peoria, Illinois, 
in 1888, by Bishop Spalding. He served 
as assistant to l-'ather Hedges, of Pontiac, 
llliniiis. for cme \car. and for nine years was 
stationed at Keithsburg, Illinois, where by 
his business ability and good management 
he built a fine church and parsonage. In 
i8y8 he was transferred to Sheffield, and is 
now doing a good work in improving that 
parish. Erancis, the younger son, owns and 
operates a valuable farm of one hundred and 
si.xty acres in Charlotte township, Liv-- 
ingston county. He married Sarah Har- 
rington, and they have four children: 
Agnes M., Hazel C., Owen W'. and James 
J. E., all attending the district schools. 

Soon after his marriage, upon seeing the 
men who were returning from the gold 
fields of California, and hearing the reports 
they made, Mr. Murtaugh decided he coidd 
make money there, being young and strong, 
as well as willing to brave any dangers that 
he might add to the comfort of himself and 
his young wife. After making prepara- 



tions for the journey he went to New Or- 
leans by way of the Mississippi river, and 
then crossed the Isthmus, and by steamer 
proceeded to San Erancisco, where he landed 
after an interesting voyage of four w'eeks. 
Eor eighteen months he followed mining antl 
prospecting, meeting with hardships and 
encountering many Indians and wild beasts 
in the mountains. Eeeling abundantly re- 
paid lor his labors, his thoughts turned to- 
ward hiime and the bride he had left in Illi- 
nois, in 1857, by way of the I'anama 
route, he returned to Marshall county, Illi- 
nois. In March of the following year, with 
his family, he came to Livingston county 
anil purchased a (juarter-.section of land in 
Charlotte township, which at that time was 
all swamp and prairie land. The nature of 
the country is shown by the following ad- 
\enture which one ilay befell him. He 
started from Pontiac with alnnU eight him- 
tlred feet of lumber, but owing to the poor 
condition of the raods was obliged to throw 
about half of the load off when half way 
home, and nearly all of the remainder when 
within five miles of home, where he arrived 
on horseback with only a few boards, find- 
ing that an empty wagon was a load of 
itself through the swamps. The family 
camped out for a few weeks until he could 
erect a cabin. After eleven years of hard 
labor he succeeded in getting his land well 
improved. Not having enough land, Mr. 
Murtaugh sold his farm in Livingston 
county, in iSOg, and Ijy moving about a mile 
away purchased four hundred and forty 
acres in Ford county, which was then but 
poorly improved, but he soon transformed it 
into a most desirable farm, and successfully 
engaged in farming there until 1890. He 
made a specialty of stock raising, and also 
bought and fattened stock for the Chicago 



242 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



markets, shipping on an average of two car- 
loads of cattle and the same amount of hugs 
per year. He met with success in all his 
undertakings and became one of the well- 
to-do men of his community. He sold one 
hundred and twenty acres of his farm and 
gave the proceeds to his son Francis to give 
him a start in life, but still retains three 
hundred and twenty acres, which he rents, 
it bringing him a snug income. In 1890 he 
purchased a pleasant home in Chatsworth, 
for which he paid one thousand dollars, and 
which he has since greatly improved, and 
there he is now ii\-ing a quiet, retired life, 
free from all care and responsibility. 

In 1865, ]\Ir. ]\Iurtaugh was again mar- 
ried, his second union being with Miss Alice 
Cleary, who was born in Ireland in 1828, 
and came to America in 1852. After lix'ing 
in the east for a time, she came to Will 
county, Illinois, in 1859, and was living 
there at the time of her marriage. Three 
children were born to them, namely : ^lary, 
who died in 1889; Eugene P., who was 
killed by the kick of a horse, June 8, 1891 ; 
and Alice E., an accomplished young lady, 
at home with her parents. 

In politics Mr. Murtaugh is a Democrat, 
though he cast his first vote for Abraham 
Lincoln, and at local elections supports the 
men whom he considers best qualified to 
fill the offices regardless of party lines. He 
has never been radical in his views. Dur- 
ing his early residence in this county he 
served as school trustee, and filled the same 
oiifice in Ford county for twenty-one years, 
also road commissioner for several years. 
He is a member of the Catholic church of 
Chatsworth, and is highly respected and es- 
.esteemed by all who know him, his pleasant, 
genial manner wimiing him many friends. 
In 1873 Mr. Murtaugh returned to Ireland 



to visit the scenes 6i his boyhood, and un his 
arrival there found that his father. Matthew 
Murtaugh, had been dead about three 
months. He spent three months in renew- 
ing early acquaintances and traveling over 
Ireland and Wales, and also visiting several 
places of interest in Scotland. As he ex- 
presses it, he "went for a good time and had 
one." 



HARVEY BUTTON. 

There is no rule for achieving success, 
^ et certain elements are always found in the 
accjuirement of prosperity and these are 
close application, indefatigable energy and 
sound judgment — -qualities which ha\-e 
prcjven salient features in the success which 
has attended the efforts of Mr. Button anil 
made him one of the substantial citizens of 
Forrest. From a humble apprenticeship, he 
has adxanced steadily step by step, until he 
has long since left the ranks of the many 
to stand among the prosperous few, and at 
all times his career has been such as to 
command the public adimralion and the re- 
spect and confidence of those with whom 
he has been associated. He is now engaged 
in looking- after his real estate investments, 
including both city and country property, 
but for many years he was a well known 
figure in railroad circles. 

Mr. Button was born at Palatine Bridge, 
Montgomery county, New York, November 
II, 1838, a son of Jesse and Nancy (\'an 
Slyke) Button. His father was born in 
Syracuse, New York, in Marcli, 1820, and 
the grandfather was Jesse Button, who was 
probably a native of Syracuse, but was born 
of English parentage. He became a promi- 
nent farmer near Syracuse and died in that 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



243 



citv at tlie a(l\ance(l age of eighty vears. 
The lather of our subject was reared at 
Syracuse and in early manhood went to Pala- 
tine Bridge, where he engaged in contract- 
ing and building. There he married Miss 
\ an Slyke, a daughter of William \'an 
Slyke, who was born at Palatine Bridge or 
in that locality. He was a farmer and a 
member of the Lutheran church. His father 
was a native of Holland, but came to .Amer- 
ica in colonial days and served in the Revo- 
lutionary war with the colonial army. 

The father of our subject removed to 
Little Falls, Xew York, about 1849. and 
there continued contracting and building 
ifntil he was killed while raising a building, 
in 1861. He left seven children, of whom 
our subject was the eldest son and second 
child. The mother, who lived in Illinois 
for Slime years, died at Palatine Bridge, in 
January. i8y8. at the age of eighty, her 
birth having occurred on the ist of March, 
18 18. The parents were worthy members 
of the L'niversalist church. 

Mr. Button, of this review, was edu- 
cated in his native town and at Little Falls, 
spending two years in an academy. He 
then learned the trade of a machinist, serv- 
ing regular apprenticeship of three years. 
In 1856, soon after its completion, he went 
to Detroit, Alichigan, and there began rail- 
road work, being employed near ^\'indsor, 
on the construction of the old Great Western 
Railroad. He was then working on the 
Michigan Central from Detroit, filling the 
position of fireman until i860, when he was 
made an engineer, and ran from Detroit ta 
Marshall. He served in that capacity for 
two years, after which he spent si.x months 
on the construction engine of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Onincy, running from Men- 
<lota, Illinois. After the expiration of that 



period he ran from Aurora to Galesburg 
and Ouincy, being thus engaged until the 
fall of 1865. He hauled nianv of the sol- 
diers proceeding to the south. He carried 
eighteen cars of soldiers out of Quincy one 
day and another train of eighteen cars fol- 
lowed. They stopped at Keokuk Junction 
for water and the second train oertook them. 
Ihe soldiers had been fooling with the hand- 
brakes, and Mr. Button told the officers if 
they did not keep the men away from the 
brakes they woukl be stopped and the other 
train would run into them. This did little 
good and after si.x or seven more miles had 
been passed, as they were going around a 
curve near Augusta, the soldiers again 
.'.topped the train. Mr. Button then jumped 
off and told the conductor to start the train 
as soon as he coulil get the brakes ofif, and 
lie (Mr. Button) would crawl over, the train 
and into his engine, liis object being to get 
the brakes off as soon as possible and get 
out of the way of the other train. He just 
succeeded in this when the other train came 
around the curve, and he signalled to the 
fireman to go ahead and get out of the way, 
thus saving the lives of many soldiers. Mr. 
Button then again saw the officers in charge 
and told them he would not pull out until a 
guard was put at the brakes. This was 
done, after which all went well. 

In the fall of 1865 Mr. Button went to 
Springfield, Illinois, and ran an engine on 
the Wabash road until the fall of 1880, when 
he was sent to Forrest to take charge of the 
shops as general foreman, holding that posi- 
tion until January, 1893. This is an im- 
portant shop, in which many men are em- 
ployed. It was not then finished and he 
put in the machinery, placing everything in 
working operation. He had charge of about 
sixty men and continued as superintendent 



244 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the shops and his retirement from active 
business labor, other than the supervision of 
his property interests. Working his way 
steadily upward, he was familiar with e\ery 
branch of the work and was therefore very 
competent to direct the labors of others. 
He was one of the most trusted representa- 
tives of the road, enjoying the confidence 
of the corporation and the respect of all 
v>'hom he superintended. 

In the meantime Mr. Button had be- 
come the owner of both farm and town pri_)p- 
erty, and in addition to his realty in Liv- 
ingston county, he owns farms in McLean 
county, Illinois, and also in Indiana. He 
erected the business block at the corner oc- 
cupied by the drug store and by the Masonic 
lodge — one of the best blocks in the town. 
He has also built a large two-story brick 
building on the next corner — one of the most 
modern and improved in the city. Since 
1893 his attention has been given to the 
management ui his investments and to real 
estate dealing. 

While in Mendota Mr. Button was mar- 
ried on the 24th of December, 1863, to 
Miss Jennie Jewitt, daughter of Charles 
Jewitt, who removed to Mendota from De 
Kalb county, where he had engaged in farm- 
ing until 1849, ^vhen he went to California, 
where he remained until 1852. He then 
engaged in the grain business in IMendota. 
He had come to Illinois from Yorkshire, 
England. After his first residence in Cali- 
fornia, he aeain spent two years there, and 
then once more livetl in Mendota for a time, 
Init ultimately removed to Remington, In- 
diana, where he purchased a farm. The 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Button has been 
blessed with one child, Clara, now the wife 
of David T. Torrence, of Chicago. Mr. 
Button is a Republican in his political views 



anil votes for the men and measures of the 
party! but has never been an aspirant for 
ofiice. He belongs to Forrest Lodge, No. 
614, F. & A. ]\I., and attends and supports 
the Congregational church. In politics he 
is recognized as an important factor in local 
party ranks and has frequently been a dele- 
gate to county and state conventions. He 
aided in nominating Governor Fifer, was 
again a member of the state convention in 
1892, and supported Governor Tanner's 
candidacy in 1896. His life has been one 
of marked industry and usefulness, and in 
every relation of life he has commanded the 
respect, confidence and esteem of his fellow 
men. Always just and upright, ofttimes 
generous and liberal, ever an advocate of the 
right, his life stands in exemplification of 
our highest ty]je of .American manhood. 



\\ILLIA-M A. WILLIAMSON. 

William A. Williamson, one of the high- 
ly respected and honored citizens of Saune- 
min township, Lixingston county, Illinois, 
was born near Russellville, Brown county, 
Ohio, March 18, 1858. His father, William 
Williamson, was a native of Fleming coun- 
ty, Kentuck}-, and a son of John William- 
son, a Revolutionary soldier, who removed 
to southern Ohio when his son was only ten 
}-ears old and there followed farming through- 
out the remainder of his life. He died at 
the advanced age of eighty-nine years. The 
father grew to manhood in Ohio and also 
followed the occupation of farming in that 
state until his death, which occurred October 
20, 1889. He was quite an extensive farmer 
and served as justice of the peace. In early 
life he married Nancy Snedaker, a native of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



245 



southern Ohio and a (laughter of Garrett 
Sne<laker. who moved from Pennsylvania 
to tiiat state and was also an agriculturist. 
Mrs. Williamson now makes her home with 
our subject. She is a consistent member of 
the Presbyterian church, of which her hus- 
band was an elder f(;r twenty years and a 
Sunday school teacher many years, always 
liaving taken an active part in church affairs. 

During his boyhood and youth William 
A. Williamson obtained a good education 
in the common schools near his home and 
;'t Russellville. Ohio. At the age of twenty 
years he left home and commenced life for 
himself as a farmer. In 1884 he came to 
Livingston county, Illinois, and rented a 
farm in Forrest township for eight years. 
In the fall of iSgi he purchased his present 
fiirni III one huntlred and sixty acres in 
Saunemin township, but did not locate there- 
on until the spring of 1893. It had pre- 
\iously been used as a pasture and there was 
ni)t a single improvement upon it. but he 
erected a pleasant residence, a good barn 
and windmill, set out trees, and made many 
other improvements which add greatly to the 
value and beauty of the place. 

On the 4th of September, 1884. Mr. 
W illiamson was united in marriage with 
Miss Ella Heckert of Forrest, a daughter 
of Joseph and Margaret (Miller) Heckert. 
She was reared by E. R. Francis, as her 
mother died when she was quite young. By 
this union have been born five children : Ed- 
ward. Susie and Harry, living, and Morris 
and Ada. deceased. The parents are both 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and the family is one of high standing in the 
community where they reside. Socially, 
Mr. Williamson affiliates with the Modern 
W'odmen of .\nierica. and politically, is 
identified with the Republican party. For 



si.x years he has served as school director, 
and in 1900 was elected road commissioner, 
in which capacity he has assisted in making 
many improvements in his township, includ- 
iiig the construction of a new bridge over 
the \'ermilion river at a cost of three thou- 
sand dollars. 



WILLIAM r. GOEMBEL. 

When after years of long and earnest 
labor in some honorable field of business, a 
man puts aside all cares to spend his re- 
maining years in the enjoyment of the 
fruits of his former toil, it is certainly a 
well deserved reward of his early industry. 

•' How blest is he who crowns in shades hke these 
A youth of labor with an age of ease," 

wrote the poet, and the world everywhere 
recognizes the justice of a season of rest 
following an active period of business life. 
Mr. Goembel is now living retired at his 
home on section 4, Fayette township. Liv- 
ingston county, and his history is one that 
shows the accomplishment of well-directed 
labor. 

Mr. Goembel was born in Hesse-Cassel, 
Germany. February 20. 1833. a son of Philip 
and Caroline Eliza (Stoeber) Goembel, also 
natives of that country, where the father 
carried on a damask manufactory for a pe- 
riod of thirty years. He then came to the 
United States in 1851, and first settled in 
Tazewell county. Illinois, where he followed 
f;irming five years. At the en'd of that time 
he came to Livingston county, and made 
his home in the extreme southea.stern part 
of what was then known as Oliver's Grove, 
but is now Germanville township, until his 
death in 1875. In early life he was an in- 



246 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



(lustrious. energetic man, hut spent liis last 
years in retirement from active labor. His 
wife also died in Germanville township in 
1872, and they now sleep side by siile. In 
their family were only two children : ^\'ill- 
Kim P., our subject; and Caroline, also a 
native of Germany, and now the wife of 
Nicholas Froebe, a well-to-do farmer of 
California, who still owns over two hundred 
acres of land in Germanville township, Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois, which he leases. 
They had six children, namely: William 
P., a farmer of that township, who died at 
the age of thirty-eight years, leaving a 
widow and five children, the former now de- 
ceased ; Caroline, wife of Plenry Hendricks, 
a prosperous farmer of Germanville town- 
ship, by whom she has six chiklren ; ]\Ia- 
tilda. who married Henr)- Huhimel, a well- 
to-do farmer of the same townshi]), and 
diet! in 1896, leaving four children; Eliza- 
beth, wife of John Hummel, of German\-ille 
township, by whom she has several children; 
Emma, who is with her parents in Califor- 
nia; and Charles, a farmer of that state, who 
is married and has one child. 

William P. Goembel was educated in 
private schools of his native land, and ac- 
companied the family on their emigration 
to America, remaining with his parents un- 
til twenty-three years of age, when he com- 
menced farming for himself in Tazewell 
county. In the fall of 1S56 he came to Liv- 
ir.gston coiuit)- and purchased one hundreil 
and four acres of raw prairie land in (ier- 
manville township, which he tiletl, broke 
and improved, making it one of the best 
farms in that locality. He resided there 
twenty-four years, during which time he 
bought a large amount of land, including 
two hundred and fnrt}' acres in Charlotte 
township; one hundred and sixty acres ad- 



joining his home farm in (iermanville town- 
ship, and also property in Chatsworth and 
Fayette townships, Livingston county. In 
connection with general farming he devoted 
considerable attention to the raising of stock. 
In November, 1880. he moved to the village 
of Strawn, where he successfully engaged 
in business as a dealer in grain, lumber, coal 
and farming implements until 189 1, when 
he located upon his present farm on section 
4, Fayette township, making it his home 
ever since. It consists of three hundred 
and twenty acres of rich and arable land, and 
is successfully operated by his sons. After 
his removal to the farm, Mr. Goembel con- 
tinued to carry on his business in the vil- 
lage for a few years, but for the past six or 
se\en years has lived a retired life. 

On the 13th ni December, 1863, Mr. 
Goeml)el married IVliss Elizabeth Shroen, 
also a native of Hesse-Cassel, Germany, 
born in 1844, on the farm of her father, 
who spent his entire life on his nati\-e S(_)il, 
dying there in 1852. Her mother came to 
this country and died in Fayette township, 
Livingston county. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Goembel were born the following children : 
Catherine is the wife of Nelson Kiner, a 
prosperous farmer of Marseilles, Illinois, 
and thev ha\e two children. Earl and Eva; 
!Mollie is the wife of F. M. Cur3-ea. a farmer 
of Fayette township; Maggie is the wife of 
J. I\I. Mahon. station agent for the Big Four 
Railroad Company at Mansfield, Illinois; 
John, a farmer of Fayette township, married 
Laura Welling, and they have two children, 
^Marguerite and William P.; Charles N. is 
living on the home farm; Mary is the wife 
of C. J. Bartlett, station agent on the Wa- 
bash Railroad at Mansfield, and they have 
two children, Clinton and Elizabeth; Will- 
iam, a farmer of Belle Prairie township, 



THE BlOCiKAl'HlCAL RECORD. 



247 



Livingston county, married Ida Vmniger. 
;iiul they liave one child: Paulina and Min- 
nie are Imth at home: and Delia died in Fav- 
ette township, Septemher 17, 1889. 

The family are members of tlie Clerman 
Lutheran ciuirch, and Mr. Cloemhel is also 
a member of Sibley Lodge, V. & .\. M.. ami 
the Ciiapter and Commandery at I-'airliury. 
In his political affiliations he is a Democrat, 
and has taken ciuite an active and influential 
[)art in local politics. During his entire 
residence in Strawn he was a member of the 
village boarol ; was the first supervisor of 
dermanville township, which office he held 
for a number of j'ears in that township, and 
for some time in F"ayette township. He has 
also served as township treasurer several 
\-ears and as justice of the peace, and lakes 
a tleep and commendable interest in i)ublic 
affairs, doing all in his power to promote 
the general welfare. 



jOUX THOMAS LOX'I'.LI,. 

Jcilin Thiimas Luvell, nne i>i the most 
sr.ccessful agriculturists of Broughton t">wn- 
shi)), Livingston county, and one of its rcj)- 
resentative citizens, was liorn in ISarnwell, 
Nortbamiitonshire, England, .\pril 3. 1837, 
and is a sou of Moses and Mary ( Bowen ) 
Lovell. Throughout life the father was em- 
pl('yed as a shepherd in thai cnuiUry. and 
also as a stacker during barxest. After a 
long and useful life he died, in 1888. and 
I'lis wife passed away in 1883. In their f:nn- 
ily were five chiklren, namely: William, 
who died at the age of nineteen years: 
jdhn T., our .subject; James, a farmer of 
Kniix county, Nebraska: Samuel, a resident 
of England: and Elizabeth, wife of Henry 



(iolden. a cabinetmaker of that country. 
Only our subject and James came to the 
I'nited States. 

John T. Lo\ell was reared on a farm and 
attended the public schools of his native 
land. .\t the age of eighteen years he came 
to America, landing in Xew \'ork, and first 
settled in Castleton, Rutland county, \'er- 
mont, where he was in the employ of Dr. 
Joseph Perkins, a professor in the Burling- 
t(.n Medical Callege for eight years, work- 
ing at first for twelve dollars per month. He 
remained with him until after the civil war, 
and in 1866 came to Illinois, spending a year 
and a half in Cirundy county, where he 
herded cattle or w< irked at anything he could 
find to do. Sulise(|ueiuly he rented a farm 
and began life for himself. 

In 1867 Mr. Lovell married Miss Caro- 
line Coskey, a daughter of John and Eliza- 
beth (Xooks) Co.skey. The m<ither is now- 
deceased, but the father is still living at the 
age of seventy-eight years and makes his 
h.ome in Braceville, CJrundy county. Mrs. 
Lovell was born in Lockjxirt. Illinois, in 
May, 1850, but was li\ing in (irundy county 
at the lime of her marriage. She is the 
oldest of a family of eight children, the 
others being .Mice. Lmm;i. .\larth:i. Louisa, 
Marv, b'rederick and Charles, a farmer of 
Sullivan lownshi]), Livingston county. Our 
subject and iiis wife bad four children, of 
whom .\lvin died at the age of six- 
teen years, William, a farmer of Broughton 
lownshi]). married Lena Trecker and they 
have two children, John and Frederick, 
lierlram operates the home farm for his fa- 
ther. Ollie Mae is the wife of (ieorge Ker- 
sev, a farmer of Cardriff, Illinois. 

On coming to Livingston county in 1867 
Mr. Lovell jnirchased forty acres of wild 
prairie land in Broughton township and has 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



made every improvement upon tlie place, in- 
cluding the erection of a barn and resi- 
dence, the planting of an orchard and the 
tiling of the land. So successful has he been 
that he has added to his landed possessions 
from time to time until he now owns six 
forty-acre tracts, all under a high state of 
cultivation. In June. 1887, he had the mis- 
fortune to lose his barn, which was struck 
by lightning, killing his horses and destroy- 
ing his hay. His loss, which amounted to 
about one thousand dollars, was imi1\- partlv 
covered by insurance. With characteristic 
energy, however, he at once erected a larger 
and better barn. He carries on botli farming 
and stock raising, and has prospered through 
his own unaided efforts. He is a man of 
good business ability and sound judgment 
and well deserves the success that he has 
achieved. Since 1898 he has practicallv 
lived a retired life, and has recentlv pur- 
chaseil a comfortable residence in Cabery, 
where he e.xpects to make his home and 
enjoy a well-earned rest. 

In his political views Mr. Lovell is a Re- 
publican and during almost his entire resi- 
dence in this county has filled the office of 
school director in a most acceptable man- 
ner, having always taken an active interest 
in maintaining good schools. He also served 
as constable four vears. 



GEORGE H. CHAPMAX. 

r 

George H. Chapman, a progressive, en- 
ergetic and successful agriculturist, whose 
home is on section 12, Odell township, Liv- 
ingston county. Illinois, is a native of New 
York, his birth occurring in Ontario coun- 
ty, January 4, 1851. His parents, Hiraiu 



W. and Ann E. (Davis) Chapman, were 
born in the same county of good old New 
England stock, and were farming people, 
who continued to reside in New York until 
1855, in which year they moved to La Salle 
county, Illinois, the father purchasing a 
quarter-section of land near Marseilles, to 
which he subsecpiently added another cjuar- 
ter-section. He speculated in land quite ex- 
tensi\'ely, and was very successful in his 
operations, t>wning at the time of his death 
about fi\-e hundred acres. In political senti- 
ment he was a Republican, but at local elec- 
tions \-oted for the man and not the party. 
Although he was not a member of any 
church, he gave to their support, and his 
wife was a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. She died on the old home 
farm in 1882, at the age of fifty-nine years. 
'I hree years later he retired from active 
labor, and died March 2, 1897, at the age of 
se\'enty-se\en. In their family were six 
sons and one daughter, of whom two died in 
infancy. The others are George H.. our 
subject ; Osmer, who was born in New 
^ Ork, and is now engaged in farmmg near 
the old homestead in La Salle county : Frank 
O.. who is engaged in farming and the rais- 
ing of full-blooded Poland China hogs and 
Short-horn cattle near the homestead: Lu- 
cina, who died in 1878. sot>n after grad- 
uating at a school in Battle Creek, Michigan; 
and Otis, who also lives on the old home 
farm. Those living are married and have 
families of their own. 

During his boyhood anil youth George 
H. Chapman aided in the work of the farm 
through the summer season and attended 
school in winter. He remained under the 
parental roof until he was married. January 
24. 1877. to Miss Roselle Olmstead, who 
was bom in Grundv countv, Illinois. Mav 




G. H. CHAPMAN. 




MRS. G. H. CHAPMAN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



253 



I, 1S55. a daughter of Andrus and Ann 
E. (Arcliibald) Olmstead, residents n{ La 
Salle and C.rundy counties for over fifty 
years. The mother, who was of Scotch 
descent, dietl in 1884. but the father is still 
living at the age of sixty-eight years and 
finds a pleasant home with our subject, lie 
hatl four daughters besides Mrs. Chapman, 
namelv: Mrs. J. E. Fingston. whose hus- 
bend is a liutcher of Odell ; Mrs. Eliza Lay- 
man, a resident of Scandia. Kansas ; Mrs. 
Helen Duttenhavor, who lives near Kent- 
land. Indiana ; and Mrs. Esther Pope, who 
died in Odell. in 1883. Of the seven chil- 
dren, four sons and three daughters, born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Chajiman. ime died in in- 
fancy, and Harr\- at the age of nineteen 
years. Those living are Fred; .Annie: Hat- 
tie, twin sister of Harry; Ernest and Gracie. 
They were educated in the Odell high school 
and the sons are now assisting their father 
on the farm. 

For one year after his marriage Mr. 
Cha])man was employed as a traveling 
salesman. ha\ing previously followed that 
occupation during the winter for eight years 
with good success. He lived upon a part 
of his father's land in La Salle county until 
the 1st of January, 1883. when he came to 
Livingston county and purchased one hun- 
dred and si.xty acres of land in Odell town- 
shi]), which he improved and transformed 
into a good farm. Later he bought one 
hundred and sixty acres of land near 
Dwight. which he fully improved and after- 
ward sold, and at one time owned a similar 
amount in Iowa, which he sold at a good 
profit. Upon his fine farm in Odell town- 
ship he has now (in the summer of 1900) 
erected a commodious and beautiful resi- 
dence at a cost of thirty-five hundred dol- 
lars, fitted with all modern improvements 



and finished in natural woods, mostly 
cypress. It is beautifully located and will 
he one of the finest homes in the township. 
In connection with general farming Mr. 
Chapman has carried on dairying and has 
also dealt in short-horn cattle, for which he 
finds a ready sale in the local markets. For 
the past three years he has lived retired from 
active labor, but still superintends the opera- 
tion of his farm. 

.\t notional elections Mr. Chapman sup- 
ports the Republican party, but in local 
affairs he votes independent of party lines, 
sui)porting the men whom he believes best 
(jualified for office. lie has served as 
])athmaster and school director, hut ha:5 
never cared for political preferment. So- 
ciallv he is a member of the Independenc 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen of America, being chief consul 
of his camp three years and a charter mem- 
ber of the same. He is a man of high 
standing in the community where he lesides, 
and has many friends both in La Salle and 
Livingston counties. 



EL\'U-: T. POTTER. 

I':ivie T. Potter, a i)rosperous farmer 
an<l one of the most popular and in- 
rtuential citizens of Round Grove township. 
Livingston county, Illinois, his home being 
on section 15. was born March 9. 1857. in 
the house where he still resides, a son of 
Stephen and Mary .\. ( Killmer) Potter, na- 
tives of Washington county. New York, 
the former born .\i)ril 1. 1806. the latter 
February 2;^. 181 4. In the county of his 
nati\ity the father was reared on a farm 
and educated in the common schools until 



= 54 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



fourteen years of age,, when he went to Es- 
sex county. New York, and was tliere mar- 
ried August 25. 1834. Immediately after 
his marriage he removed to Cuyahoga 
ctiunty, Ohio, where he Ijouglit one hun- 
dred acres of liea\ilv timheretl lanch to 
tlie imprcn-ement autl cu1ti\ation of wliicii 
he tle\oted his energies until 1844. when 
he sold the place and moved to Joliet, 
Illinois, becoming one of its earl\- pio- 
neers. Leaving his family in that city he 
went to California in 1849, ^'""1 engaged in 
mining for five years with good success. 
He returned to Joliet in 1854. and in the 
spring of 1855 came to Livingston county, 
wliere he purchased a claim, consisting of 
the south half of section 15, Round Grove 
township, which at that time was all raw 
prairie. He erected thereon a story and a 
half frame house, eighteen by eighteen feet, 
it being the fifth house in the township and 
the first frame house, the rest being built 
of logs along the east branch of the Mazon. 
He made his home there until his death, 
which occurred August 31, 1889. and his 
remains were interred in Round Gro\e cem- 
etery. He tnnk an actix'e part in public 
affairs and always supported the Democratic 
party. He was one of the leaders in organ- 
izing his town, and held most of the town- 
ship offices. He was especially actixe 
in school matters, having assisted in 
organizing the school districts and build- 
ing the first frame house. Inuring the 
most of his life he was a meiuber of the 
school board, serving as either director or 
trustee. His wife is still lixing antl now re- 
sides with a daughter in Dwight. His 
parents, Thomas and Wealthy ( W'eller) 
Potter, were also natives of New York, 
while the former was of English and the 
latter of German extraction. 



The subject of this sketch is the }-(iung- 
est in a fanfily of eight children, the others 
being as follows: Charlotte B., born Octo- 
ber 17, 1835, married Jesse Eldred, of 
Round Grove township, and died leaving 
fi^ur children : Cora, wife of Anthony Kern. 
of Streator, Illinois: L. J., a resident of 
Stockton, California ; Stephen, of San Fran- 
cisco ; and Minnie, wife of William Farrar, 
of Peru, Indiana. (2) Mary died in chikl- 
hood. (3) George W., born October ly, 
1839, is connected with the Enterprise Man- 
ufacturing Company, of Joliet. He married 
Emma Godfrey, of Du Page county, IIli- 
niiis, and they have three children : Edna, 
wife of Roy Hess, of Joliet ; Pearl and Ciaire. 
(4) ^largaret S. is living with her mother 
in Dwight. (5) Reuben K.. horn September 
26, 1844, was telegraph operator and sta- 
tion agent at Dwight and Joliet for many 
years, and died July 7, 1885, unmarried. 
(6) Albert, born December 3, 1847, wa^ 
engaged in detective work for some years, 
and is now servmg as deputy sheriff of 
Miami county, Indiana, his home being in 
Peru. He married Louisa Hubbanl. of 
Round Grove township, this county, and 
has tme son, Guy E. (7) Alanson, born Oc- 
tober 2-j, 1855, died January 28, 1858. 

Elvie T. Potter grew to manhood on the 
old homestead and was educated in the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood. His 
brothers had all left home by the time he 
was fifteen years old, and he was therefore 
his father's (_)nlv assistant in his extensive 
farming and stock raising operations. For 
ten years prior to his father's death our sub- 
ject had entire charge (.>f the place, and 
since then has purchased the interests of 
the other heirs in the farm, consisting of 
two hundred anil forty acres of rich and 
arable lanil. He has engaged extensivelv 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



255 



ill feeding cattle and raising Hambletonian 
liorses, and was actively engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits up to within the last two years, 
when he leased his land, though he still re- 
sides thereon. 

.\t the home of his father. .-\])ril 22. 
188C), Mr. Potter wedded Miss Mary (ilover, 
a popular and successful teacher, who taught 
school in this and Grundy counties for ten 
\'ears jirior to her marriage. Her parents 
were Samuel L. and Martha J. (Dunn) 
(ilover. also early settlers nf this county. 
their home being in Broughton township. 
Her father was a native of Xew \'nrk. her 
mother of Pennsylvania, where their mar- 
riage was celebrated. They are now resi- 
dents of Xel)raska. and Imth here and in 
that state. Mr. Glover has taken an active 
part in jniblic affairs, serving as sujiervisor 
and school trustee. He is a Republican in 
politics, and in early life was a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
was active in organizing the (irange. In 
his family were the following children : 
Deett. wife of Warren McKae. a tarmcr of 
Custer county. Nebraska; Mary, wife of 
our subject : Grace, wife of E. \' . Sparks, 
a ranchman and teacher of Trapahoc c unity, 
Colorado; Henry B., who is at home with 
his ])arents in Custer county, Nebraska ; 
Percy 1)., who married Augusta Lower, of 
Broughton township, this county, and is 
now living in Custer county, Nebraska; and 
Sidney L., a carpenter, who is li\ing with 
our subject. 

Mr. Potter las always taken an active part 
in political affairs and is a stanch supporter 
of tlie Democratic party. The first office he 
was called u])on to fill was that of township 
collector, in which capacity he served his 
fellow citizens from 1887 to 1894, inclusive. 
Pie was also elected supervi.sor of his town- 



ship in 1887 and held that office for eight 
consecutive years, at the end of which time 
he declined a re-nomination. For several 
years there had been no opposing candidate, 
antl when there was he was always elected 
by a large majority. I ie served on the equali- 
zation ccinimittee his entire term; was chair- 
man of the judiciary committee two years, 
and was also a member of the committees 
on education, fees and salaries, auditing, 
jail and jail acounis. During his admin- 
istration the new county house was erected. 
I'or sixteen years he has served as school 
director in district No. 5. In 1892 he re- 
ceived the Democratic nomination for the 
legislature, and. notwithstanding the large 
Republican majority in other nortions of the 
district, he received a \ 1 ite sut^icient tt) make 
his campaign a wortliy one as an inde.x to 
his popularity and ab-lity. In all the rela- 
tions of life he has been found true tt) every 
trust reposed in him, and commands the 
respect and confidence of all with wliom he 
comes in contact, either in jnililic or private 
life. Socially he is a charter member of 
Campus Camp. No. 2019, Modern W oodmen 
of America. 



ALI'.KRT J. SXb:VD. 

Albert J. Sneyd. one of Clial>wi;rtir-; 
representative business men and most pro- 
gressive citizens, was born in Lockport, Illi- 
nois, July 19, 1867, a son of Josei)h and 
Mary ( Kobliska) Sneyd, natives of .\ustria, 
who came to America with their resi)ective 
parents when about fourteen years of age. 
The families settled near Lockport. Illinois. 
where the grandparents of our subject d-x<\ 
soon afterward. There the father worked 
as a farm hand for eleven years, and after 
his marriage moved to Ashkuni. Illinois. 



256 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wliere he ]nircl:ase(l and iniprcned a lialf- 
secticm (if land. He was successfully en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising 
until his death, which occurred in 1890. 
His wife died at the home of our subject in 
Chatsworth in 1896. Both were members of 
the Catholic church and he was a Democrat. 
l)ut never took any active part in politics 
aside from x'oting. 

Albert J. Snevd grew to manhncid on the 
home farm, aiding his father in its opera- 
tion and attended the public schools of Ash- 
kum. On leaving the farm in 1893 '''^ came 
to Chatsworth. where, in partnership with 
Charles Burns, he embarked in the hardware 
business, purchasing the stock of E. A. Jack- 
son. Under the firm name of Sneyd & Burns 
they successfully carried on business for six 
years, during which time they enlarged their 
stock, as well as increased the volume of 
trade. In the spring of 1899 Mr. Sneyd 
sold his interest to Mr. Burns, who still 
continues the business, and for a year lived 
retired, but in the spring of 1900 he pur- 
chased a lot, upon which he erected a com- 
modious warehouse and stocked it with a 
full line of buggies, wagons, planters, and in 
fact all kinds of heavy and light farm ma- 
chinery and implements. He has made a 
decided success for the first season's venture 
in the new enterprise, for, being among 
the well-known and reliable business men of 
the town, he has secured a liberal share of the 
public patronage. He not only owns his 
present place of business, but has a half 
interest in the building where he was for- 
merly engaged in the hardware trade, his 
home property in Chatsworth and a fine 
farm of one hundred and ten acres on sec- 
tions 16 and 17. Ashkum township, Iro- 
quois county, which was part of the old 
homestead. 



On the J^i\ of May, 1894, Mr. Sneyd 
was united in marriage with Miss Annie E. 
Phillips, who was born in Chebanse, Illinois, 
October i, 1869, a daughter of Thomas and 
Kate (McGlone) Phillips. Her father is 
now deceased, but her mother is still living 
and resides on the old liome farm near Ash- 
kum. To Mr. and Mrs. Sneyd have been 
born two children : Francis and Leo Al- 
bert, bright children, who are the jov of the 
home. The parents are both members of 
the Catholic church and Mr. Sneytl is also 
a member of the Modern Woodmen Cam]), 
No. 1829, of Chatsworth. Politically he 
affiliates with the Democratic party. He 
is wideh' and favorably known and in social 
as well as business circles stands deservedly 
hieh. 



WILLIAM D. McMILLAX. 

William D. McMillan, the well-known 
Forrest, Illinois, and a member of the vil- 
lage board of trustees, is a native of Liv- 
ingston county, born in Rooks Creek town- 
ship October 5, 1846, and is a son of Will- 
iam and grandson of Andrew McMillan. 
The father was born in Jonesville, Lee coun- 
ty, Virginia. September 27. 1802. and there 
grew to manhood upon his father's farm. 
He came to Livingston county, Illinois, as 
early as 1834, and located in Rcxiks Creek 
township, when the Indians were still liv- 
ing in this region. Here he took up a large 
tiact of government land, about four hun- 
dred acres, which he improved, retaining 
most of it until his death. He became one 
of the most prominent and influential citi- 
zens of his community, in politics was first 
a Whig and later a Democrat, and held the 
office of justice of the peace from the earliest 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



257 



recollection of our subject. In 18.^8 he mar- 
ried Eliza Breckenridge. a daughter of Rob- 
ert Breckenridge, who was also one of the 
pioneers and land holders of Rooks Creek 
township, ha\ing come here from near Sar- 
dinia. Brown county. Ohio, about the same 
time as Mr. .McMillan. By this marriage 
were horn four chiklren. three nf whom 
are still li\ing. one of these being our sub- 
ject. The mother, who was a member of 
the Methodist church, died in 1849. ''"^l ^lie 
father subse(|uently married her sister. Mrs. 
Anna .\nderson. He died in June. 1864. 
honored and respected by all who knew him. 

The earl}- education of William D. Mc- 
I^Iillan was acquired in the common schools 
of RcK)ks Creek township, and he remained 
at home until his father's death. Desiring 
a better education he sold forty acres of the 
iiomc farm, and after gi\ine his mother 
her dowry used the remainder in paying 
his expenses at Eureka College. Having 
thus secured a good practical education he 
returned home and engaged in farming until 
1870. when he went to Pontiac. The fol- 
lowing year he commenced learning photog- 
raphy and devoted iiis attention to that art 
until 1874, when he entered the service of 
the United States Express Company at Pon- 
tiac. A year later he was transferred to 
SpringficUl, and in 1880 was made express 
messenger on the Forrest and Streator train 
of the Wabash Railroad. On the ist of 
June. 1893. he was appointed agent at For- 
rest, where tlie company does a large lousi- 
ness, as the town has two lines of railroad. 
The position is therefore one of much re- 
sponsibility, and he discharges his duties 
in a most creditable and satisfactory man- 
ner. 

On the 8th of .April, 1876. Mr. McMillan 
married Miss Laura Harper, of Livings- 



ton county, who was born in Waynestown, 
Indiana, a daughter of John Harper, an old 
resident here, who settled in this county 
w hen Mrs. McMillan was only six years old. 
By this union have been born five children : 
Ira Douglas (decea.sed). Frederick \V., 
-Artie Ray (deceased). Leslie C. and I'.dna 
E. The parents are both members of the 
.Methodist Episcopal church, in which Mr. 
McMillan is now serving as steward. He 
cast his first vote for the Democratic party, 
but since then has been a stanch Republican, 
though he has taken no active part in politi- 
cal affairs. While a resident of Rooks 
Creek township he filled the office of col- 
lector, and without his knowledge he was 
nominated as a member of the city council 
on the no-license board in 1899 ''"'-1 elected 
l)y a good majority, though he made no ef- 
fort to secure the ofifice. During his term 
the board has done considerable toward 
street improvements, which have greatly 
pleased the people of the town. Fraternally 
Mr. McMillan is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 



JOHN ELLIXGER. 

John I'Jlinger, a ])rominent tarnicr of 
section 35, Pontiac township. Livingston 
county, comes from the fatherland, and 
the strongest and mostcreditable character- 
istics of the eutonic race have been inarked 
elements in his life and have enabled him 
to win success in the face of opposing cir- 
cumstances. He posses.ses the energy and. 
determination which mark the i:)eople of Ger- 
many, and by the exercise of his powers 
has steadily progressed, and has not onl}- 
won a handsome competence but has com- 



258 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



manded universal respect liy his straight- 
forward business methods. 

Mr. Ellinger was born in \\'urteniluu-o-, 
Germany, October i6, 1849, ^ son of George 
and Carrie D. (Keibler) Ellinger, life-long 
residents of that place and active members 
of the Lutheran church. The father was a 
farmer and -land owner and was one of the 
highly respected men of his community. 
He died in 1893, the mother about eight 
years before. 

Our subject obtained a good practical ed- 
ucation in the public schools of his nati\e 
land, and at the age of fifteen went into 
the \illaee of Oppenweiler, which was near 
lus father's home, devoting a year and nine 
months to learning the baker's trade. Not 
liking the business, he decided to try his 
fortune on this side of the Atlantic, and 
celebrated the seventeenth anniver:-ary of his 
birth on board a vessel bound for America. 
His ticket ttiok him to Washington. Illinois, 
where he borrowed three dollars with which 
to proceed to Peoria, from a fellcv.- passen- 
ger, his own means being exhausted by this 
time. He secured work on a farm near that 
city, \\h.ere he remained for some time, and 
with his employer went to Peoria, work- 
ing for him two years, but his wages v,ere 
never paid for the last six months. Secur- 
ing an old h.orse he again started for the 
country and after spending a few weeks in 
El Paso, he hired out to a farmer north- 
west of that place for one }-ear. Later, 
being refused the privilege of attending 
church, he entered the employ of a neighbor, 
for whom he worked until fall. He was 
employed in that neighborhood for five 
years during which time he managed to 
save enough money to start in life for him- 
self, renting eighty acres of land in Ford 
county for two years. 



In the meantime Mr. Ellinger was mar- 
rried, July 27, 1870, to Miss Sophia Muel- 
ler, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daugh- 
ter of George Mueller, who with his family 
moved from that state to Indiana and later 
to Illinois. To our subject and wife have 
been born twelve children, namely : Carrie, 
now the wife of John Schaffer of Eppards 
Point township, Livingston county; Lizzie, 
wife of William Schaffer, of the same town- 
ship; George, wlio married Maggie Young, 
and also li\es in Eppards Point township; 
John, who married Alta Porter and resides 
in Pontiac : Emma, wife of Edward Greid- 
ner of that city ; Katie, William, Christian, 
Arthur, .\lbert, Frank and Robert, all at 
home. 

In 187J Mr. Ellinger came to Living- 
ston county and successfully engaged in 
farming upon rented land in Saunemin 
township two years, at the end of which 
time he purchased eighty acres of land in 
that township, but hard times coming on, 
he lost it, and again rented a number of years, 
one year being spent in Sullivan township. 
and ten on one farm in Owego township. 
Subsequently he bought eighty acres in Char- 
lotte township, which he soon sold to ad- 
\antage, and then came to Pontiac town- 
ship, where he rented a half-section of land 
one }-ear. It being sold at that time he had 
to UKive, and in 1893 he purchased his pres- 
ent fine farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, one and a half miles from Pontiac, 
for which he paid ninety-two dollars and a 
luilf per acre. It is one of the finest and 
most productive farms in the county, and 
is well improved with good buildings. In 
connection with general farming, Mr. Ell- 
inger gives considerable attention to the 
raising of cattle and hogs. While a resi- 
dent of Owego township he bought a half- 



1 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



259 



section of land in Minnesota, for which he 
paid cash, and whicli he held until 1899. 

In 1899 Mr. Ellinger returned to his old 
home in Germany to visit his father. Since 
the age of nineteen years he has been a mem- 
ber of the Evangelical church, and he and 
his family are now connected with the church 
at Eppards Point. He is a Republican in 
politics but has never been an aspirant for 
office, thougii he served as school director 
three vears. 



Cll.VRLES T. BURNS. 

Charles T. Burns, who is engaged in 
the hardware business in Chatsworth, 
Livingston county, has been one of the 
leading business men of the city since 
1893. He commenced business as a junior 
member of the firm of Sneyd & Burns, Xo- 
\ ember 29, 1893, and that relation was con- 
tinued until 1899, when his brother, Thom- 
as, purchased the interest of Mr. Sneyd, and 
the business has since been conducted under 
the firm name of Burns Brothers. 

Charles T. Burns was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, June 11, 1863, and is the son of 
Thomas and Eliza (Gallagher) Burns, both 
of whom were born in Ireland, and both 
coming to this country in childhood, the 
former locating in Boston, ^lassachusetts, 
and the latter in Chicago, Illinois. In his 
youth Thomas Burns learned the ship car- 
penter's trade, which he followed for some 
j^ears, and until coming west and locating 
in Chicago, where his marriage with Miss 
Gallagher was celebrated. He is now en- 
gaged in farming in Iroquois county, Illi- 
nois, which has been his home for some 
years, and where he owns a farm of two 
hundred acres of well improved land. In 



his family were nine children: Charles T., 
the subject of this sketch ; James, living on 
a farm in Iroquois county; Anna, living at 
home; Mary, who resides in Chicago; 
1 homas, now in partnership w.th our sub- 
ject; Kate, wife of O. Ergang, who is in 
the postal service in Chicago, which is their 
home; Walter, in a grain office in Ashkum, 
Illinois; Terrence and William, at home with 
their father. The mother of these children 
died in 1886. She was a devout member of 
the Catlii)lic church, in which faith she died. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood on the farm in Iroquois county, and in 
its public schools received his education, 
which was supplemented by one term in the 
commercial department of the Northern In- 
diana Normal School at \'alparaiso, Indi- 
ana. He remained at home until he came 
to Chatsworth in 1893 and embarked in his 
present business. Success has crowned his 
efforts, and in addition to his stock of hard- 
ware, paints, oils, etc., he owns residence 
property in the city and an interest in the 
store building occupied by himself and 
brotlier. The firm carry a fine stock of goods 
and have an excellent trade, wdiich e.xtends 
many miles into the surrounding country. 

In politics Mr. Burns is a Democrat in 
national affairs, but in local matters he votes 
for the best man for the office regardless of 
party ties. By his fellow citizens he has 
been honored with local office, having served 
as alderman for five successive years. As a 
member of the board he has shown himself 
a progressive citizen, advocating every meas- 
ure proposed that seemed beneficial to the 
best interests of the place. He was interested 
in the putting in of brick walks, the building 
of the bell tower, the improvement of the 
water works, and the erection of the new 
brick city hall. He is chairman of the fire 



26o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and water committees and a member of the 
finance committee and other committees. He 
is also a member of the volunteer fire com- 
pany. 

Eraternally Mr. Burns is a member of 
Camp No. 1829, Mcodern Woodmen of 
America, and religiously he is a member of 
the Catholic church. As a citizen he is en- 
terprising and loyal to his adopted city and 
county. 



CAPTAIN HENRY FOX. 

Captain Henry Fox, a gallant ana fear- 
less officer of the civil war, and now a prom- 
inent citizen of Dwight, Illinois, was born 
in Wurtemburg. Germany, October 4, 1833. 
He was educated in a college near Stutt- 
gart, taking a literary course, and on leav- 
ing school entered a general mercantile 
establishment, where he served a three- 
years' apprenticeship and was then granted 
a diploma. He remained with that firm 
two years longer and then entered the em- 
ploy of a commission house, where he con- 
tinued to work until his emigration to the 
United States in 1854, landing in New 
York city on the day he attained his ma- 
jority. 

Business being dull there, Mr. Fox pro- 
ceeded to Milwaukee, \\'isconsin, where he 
clerked in a wholesale dry-goods house for 
two years, and while there served as second 
lieutenant in the \Visconsin Mihtia. His 
company was sent to Madison on the in- 
stallation of a new governor, in January, 
1856, they having much the same trouble 
as has recently been experienced in Ken- 
tucky. The incumbent of the office denied 
the validity of the claimant and who had 
the certificate of the canvassing board and 



refused to give up the office. This was the 
Bash ford and Barstow contest which cre- 
ated great excitement throughout the coun- 
try at the time. In September, 1856. Mr. 
Fo.x went to St. Louis, where he engaged 
in clerking for a short time, and then re- 
moved to Mt. Pulaski, Logan county, Illi- 
nois, where he was employed in the general 
store of John ^Mayer, who was engaged in 
business there for many years, and was one 
of the first settlers of Logan county. While 
there Air. Fox married his empkiyer's 
daughter. Miss Alagdalene Alayer, Septem- 
ber 10, 1857. After his marriage he was 
engaged in business for himself at Mt. Pu- 
laski a short time, but in the spring of 1861 
removed to Lincoln, Illinois, where he was 
living at the outbreak of the civil war. 

In August, 1862, Mr. Fox enlisted as 
sergeant in Company H, One Hundred and 
Sixth Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, and was 
mustered in at Lincoln, being ordered to 
Jackson, Tennessee, in September. In refer- 
ence to his service we quote the following 
from the Chicago Inter-Ocean : "A Sol- 
dier's Brave Deed. In the later part of 
December, 1862, when a small detachment 
of soldiers was scattered along the line of 
the railroad from Columbus, Kentucky, to 
Holly Springs, Mississippi, guarding the 
bridges and trestle work, the following in- 
cident took place, which for cool coiu'age 
excelled anything that came to my attention 
during my three years' service. After the 
capture of Holly Springs, Mississippi, Gen- 
eral Forrest's cavalry made a raid north- 
ward upon this line of railroad and captured 
every station between Jackson, Tennessee, 
and Columbus, Kentucky, exceut a small 
detachment of about seventy-five men who 
were guarding the bridge and the long tres- 
tle work across the Obion river about ten 




HENRY FOX. 



i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



263 



miles north uf Jackson. This detachment 
was composed of parts of Companies H and 
I, One Hundred and Sixth lUinois Infantry, 
and commanded l)_v Captain 1'. \\ . Harts, 
now of Springfield, Illinois, and Captain 
John Slmckey. now of Pappinsville, Mis- 
souri. Alter the attack on Jackson and the 
capture of Colonel Ingersoll and a part of 
the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, a detachment 
of some five hundred of Forrest's cavalry, 
with two pieces of artillery, was sent by 
General Forrest against this handful of men 
guarding the Obion bridge. The Federal 
guard had hastily made rude breastworks 
directly under the bridge, determined to 
make the best possible defense. Promptly 
at I o'clock on December 23, before the 
l)reastw(_)rks were completeil, this station 
north of the river were surroundetl by these 
five hundred rebel cavalry, who, after mak- 
ing a great display on horseback, riding 
round in a circle three or four times, thus 
making believe that the whole of Forrest's 
cavalry was present, dismounted and made 
a desperate etYort to capture the guard and 
destroy the britlge and trestle-works in order 
to break the railroad communication with 
Jackson, Tennessee. Here the unequal bat- 
tle raged until the middle of the afternoon, 
the shrieking shells and the swishing bul- 
lets crashed through the heavy bridge tim- 
bers with which the breastworks were made. 
Capture seemed inevitable. Reinforcements 
could only be hoped for from Jackson. It 
was decided that some one should venture 
to leave the fort, climb the open trestle some 
fifteen feet high and run over this, about 
one hundred and twenty rods, then through 
the timber toward Jackson, to secure rein- 
forcements. This task was solicited by 
Sergeant Henry Fox, of Company H. Hand 
over band he gained the top of the bridge, 



and then with a regular double-cjuick step, 
he ran from tie to tie across this dreadful 
line, the enemy from both sides of the road 
sho(jting at him, but while his cl()thes bore 
ample evidence of the danger he had run, 
he was untouched. Fortunately, the fire 
from the breastworks was too dangerous to 
permit the enemy to bring then" artillery 
through the woods within close range of the 
fort and from the distance the heavy tim- 
ber olistrucied the effectiveness of the 
shot and shell. The station was not cap- 
tured, the bridge was saved, reinforcements 
arrived after dark, and after the enemy had 
withdrawn and left their dead in the farm- 
iiouse on the hill. Sergeant Fox, after call- 
ing for reinforcements, returned alone, mak- 
ing the run of nine miles in one hour and 
forty minutes." This article was written and 
signed by David Harts, captain of Company 
C, One Plundred and Sixth Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry. For this gallant service our 
subject received a medal from congress with 
the following inscription; "The congress 
of the United States to Serg't Henry Fox, 
Company H, One Hundred and Sixth Illi- 
nois Infantr)-, for gallantry near Jackson, 
Tennessee, December 23, i86j." In Janu- 
ary, 1863, he was detailed as recorder of 
military commission at Memphis, and in 
May was appointed by General Hurlbut as 
captain of the Fifty-ninth Regiment United 
States Colored Troops, being mustered in 
as such June i, 1863. He participated in 
the battles of Parker's Cross Road, Gun- 
town and Tupolo, and went on to the ex- 
pedition of Oxford. In April, 1865, l^c was 
detailed as acting assistant inspector gen- 
eral of post and defenses at Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, and was on the staff of Brevet Major- 
General A. L. Chetlain. In July, 1865, he 
was detailed on the staff' of Major-General 



264 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Jolin E. Smith, United States Army, in the 
same capacity, for the district of Tennessee, 
and was finally mustered out on the last day 
of January, 1866. 

Returning to liis home in Lincoln, Illi- 
nois, Captain Fox worked in the lumher 
office of BufYham & Company for a year and 
a half, then for Elliott & Company in the 
same business until New Year's Day, 1869. 
By his doctor's advice, he then removed to 
a farm in Logan county, which he had pur- 
chased alxuU a year previous, hut as his 
health did not improve, in May, 1874, he 
nioxed to Dwight. Illinois, where he has 
since had charge of William Ccully's lands, 
consisting of several thousand acres, which 
he has managed in a most creditable and 
satisfactory manner. 

To the Captain and his wife were born 
eight children, namely : Frederick W., 
whn died in February, 1897, at the age of 
forty years, leaving a widow and two chil- 
dren : Henry, who has charge of a large 
tract of land for Mr. Scully in Nelson, Ne- 
braska; Anna E.. wife of Benjamin Show- 
waiter, of Davenport, Nebraska; Lydia L., 
who is teaching in the public schools of 
Dwight; Louis E., a resident of Kansas 
City, Missouri; Susan M., who is an artist 
of superior ability and is now giving paint- 
ing lessons in Dwight and neighboring 
cities : Pauline E., bookkeeper and cashier 
for Miller Brothers, at Dwight; and Daniel 
S. Fox, who was born in Dwight, Illinois, 
January 27, 1876, and was educated in the 
city and high school. He was then with 
his father until the time of his enlistment, 
April 26, 1898. in Company A, Third Illi- 
nois Cavalry, for a term of two years. The 
regiment was organized at Springfield, Illi- 
nois, from which place it was sent to Chick- 
amauga, where, on the 6th of July, 1898, he 



was appointed corporal. From Chicka- 
mauga the regiment was sent to Porto Rico 
with Alajor-General Brooks, it being his 
guard. With his regiment Daniel S. re- 
mained until after the close of hostilities, 
when it returned, and he was honorably dis- 
charged at Streator, Illinois. January 20, 
1899. and returned to his home, and is as- 
sisting his father in the business. The 
mother of these children died October 7, 
1879, and was buried in Dwight. Captain 
Fox was again married, October 28, 1880, 
his second union being with Miss Hattie A. 
Chamberlain, who was born near Syracuse, 
New York, and came to Illinois in 1873. 
Her father, William Chamberlain, never 
came west. She has proved a true helpmeet 
to her husband and a devoted mother to his 
children, who were young when she married 
him. 

Captain Fox is a prominent member of 
several civic societies, including Livingston 
Lodge. No. 371, F. & A. M. ; Wilmington 
Chapter, No. 142, R. A. M. : Streatur 
Council, R. & S. M. : Blaney Command- 
ery. No. 5, K. T., of Morris, Illinois ; 
Dwight Lodge, No. 513, and Dwight En- 
campment. No. 126, I. O. O. F., of which 
fraternitv he has been a member for forty- 
two years. In the subordinate lodge he has 
served as noble grand, and is now past chief 
patriarch of the Encampment. He is also 
an honored member and past commander of 
Dwight Post, No. 626. G. A. R., and a 
member of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion. Politically he is a stanch Repub- 
lican, but at local elections, when no issue is 
involved, he votes independent of party 
lines. He has ever taken an active and 
prominent part in local politics, and has been 
a member of the town board four times and 
served as mavor of Dwight two terms. He 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



265 



has ever manifested tlie same loyalty in days 
of peace as in time of war, and by all who 
know liini is held in high regard. 



SAML'EL A. LEISEROW ITZ. 

Samnel A. Leiserowitz. a prominent 
citizen of Cnllom. and a member of the well- 
known firm of Leiserowitz Brothers, general 
merchants of Cnllom, Herscher and Cabery, 
Illinois, was born in Sarle, State of Korne, 
Rnssia, Jnne 21, 1861. His father. Mendel 
Leiserowitz, a rabbi and school teacher of 
that country, has been active in church work 
since seventeen years of age and for the 
])ast fifty-three years has engaged in preach- 
ing and scluM)! teaching. He is very well 
educated and is a well known expounder of 
the Hebrew faith. He has preached in 
Sarle, Moscow, and manv smaller ]jlaces in 
Russia, and while visiting in this country 
])reached and taught school in South Chi- 
cago for four years. His father, Moses 
Leiserowitz, was also a rabbi and school 
teacher, and died while reading the Bible 
at his home in Yurgenborg, Russia, at the 
age of eighty-three years. To the parents 
of our subject were born eleven children, 
six of whcim are living, and one of the 
numl)er is still living in Russia taking care 
of the parents. Those in .\nicrica are : 
Tane L.. who is engaged in general mer- 
cantile business in Kempton, Illinois: L. L., 
who is engagetl in the painting business in 
Chicago ; Samuel .\., our subject ; Wolf, 
]>artner of our subject and a resident (i 
Herscher, Illinois; and Simon, who conducts 
the store for his Ijrothers at Cabery. 

Samuel .\. Leiserowitz attended school 
in his native land, but his earlv education 



has been greatly supplemented by reading 
and observation in later years. .\t the age 
of twehe years he began his business career, 
being employed in the office of a dealer in 
grain and all kinds of produce until he at- 
tained his majority. He then entered the 
Russian army. December i. 188 1, and served 
until August I. 1886. He was first a mem- 
ber of the Twentieth Foot Division, but on 
the 1st of August. 1882. was transferred to 
the brass band, his instrument being a 
French horn. .\s a common soldier he re- 
cieved ninety cents pay every four months 
or two dollars and seventy cents per year, 
but being promoted to what corresponds 
to our corporal his salary was raised to 
four dollars per year. In giving a dcs- 
cri])tion of the Russian army Mr. Leisero- 
witz says: "Besides their high salary the 
.soldiers were given their clothes, consisting 
of one overcoat made of material resembling 
horse blankets, an under coat of a finer 
grade of goods, a cap and trousers made of 
t^ie same material. These were supposed 
to last two years with exception of the trous- 
ers which were worn a year. Vests were 
not worn in the scr\ice. Each .soldier re- 
ceived a pair and a half of leather boots 
each year, the leggings of the first pair do- 
ing service for the second. For under and 
o\er wear linen similar to course towling 
was furnished. For hosiery the same kind 
of goods was used, and instead of being 
drawn on the feet was wrapped around. Mit- 
tens and neckties were of black blanket 
goods, and the ties were worn as Catholic 
l)riests wear them. Out of their salaries 
the soldiers have to pay for making their 
boots and underwear . buying blackening for 
shoes and belts and oil for guns. Each are 
given .seventy cents extra for incidentals, but 
this with their salarv does not half cover 



266 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



their expenses. They are given three pounds 
of rye bread a day and six cents in money 
to pay for other food, but when a company 
is stationed at one place the money goes 
into the general fund for cooking purposes, 
amounting to six dollars for one hundred 
men per day. Each soldier gets about a 
half pound of beef and soup, which is made 
of barley broken up and boiled with the 
meat. This they have for dinner and sup- 
per, while for breakfast they have only 
bread, salt and water — plenty of water but 
not always salt. A mess of ten or fifteen 
men arc given a wooden pail in which the 
soup is served. They carry a red wooden 
spoon in their boot leg and with these each 
dip into the bucket as they have no other 
dishes, knives or forks. After the meal 
however, they are generally as happy as 
larks, singing and dancing. The higher 
officers are treated as ours are. 

When his term of service expired, Mr. 
Liserowitz received a recommndation from 
his general testifying to his conduct, temper- 
ate habits, and general behavior and that 
should he again desire to enter the army he 
was to be taken back at one hundred and 
twenty dollars per year. Returning to his 
home, he remained there until January i, 
1887, when he sailed from Hamburg by way 
of Li\'erpool for New York. He proceeded 
at once to Chicago and on the train met a 
conductor, who was a relative of his father 
and who took charge of him, seeing that 
he got to his brother all right. He remained 
about twenty-four hours in Chicago. His 
money by this time was exhausted but he 
finally found a relative who let him have 
enough to go to Danforth, Illinois, where 
his brothers Wolf and Tane were then liv- 
ing. A week later the brother Wolf ordered 
for him a stock of goods amounting to little 



over forty-nine dollars, and with this he 
started out as apeddler with his pack upon his 
back. His brother drove a team and went 
a couple of miles ahead toward Cullom their 
destination. Our subject met with most 
excellent success from the start and at the 
end of three weeks was able to buy a horse 
from Frank Drendel, living east of Cullom. 
for which he paid eighteen tlollars, to be 
taken out in trade. He then went to Dan- 
forth where his brother Tane was living 
and bought a wagon. With horse and 
wagon he traveled for one year, and at the 
end of that time he and his brother Tane 
bought property in Cullom, where they suc- 
cessfully conducted a pool and billard hall 
one year. On selling out, in 1889, he and 
his brother Wolf started a store with a small 
stock of goods costing about two thousand 
dollars, and later took in another partner 
B. Brode, who was a member of the firm 
for about a year, but this venture did not 
prove a success, as three families could not 
live oiT the profits of the small store. The 
brother then went to Herscher, where he has 
since prospered, but our subject remained 
in Cullom, where he rented a building of 
J. \y. White for two years, and then of 
Walter Rider of Saunemin for five years, 
but at the end of five months he purchased 
the latter, which he subsquently enlarged. 
Later he bought a house and lot adjoining, 
sold the house and moved the oldest store, 
and erected a double store building, 40x120 
feet, and half of which is two stories in 
height, the other one story. He has stead- 
ily prospered and has never yet had occasion 
to regret his emigration to the new world. 
In March, 1899, he and his brother W'oli 
formed a partnership, and under the firm 
name of Leiserowitz Brothers have the larg- 
est stores at Cullom and Herscher, and also 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



267 



have a good store in Caherry, the building 
also being owned by them. To-day they are 
numbered among the most successful and 
progressive business men of this section. 
The Cullom store is in use as a department 
store, having added hardware, paints, wail 
paper and undertaking in addition to the 
general line handled before. There is a 
special department of silverware, jewelry, 
clocks and watches. A watchmaker of thirty 
years experience. Mr. Lawrence Holland, 
is in charge of this department. He for 
the past twelve years has been a resident of 
Cullom. 

In August, 1886, Mr. Leiserowitz mar- 
ried Miss Golda S. Cohn, and to them were 
born se\-en children, but tlie three oldest 
died in infancy. The other.-;. Joseph, Jane, 
Isadore and Esther, are all attending school. 
In politics Mr. Leiserowitz is a Republican, 
and in his social relations is a member of 
Saunemin Lodge, Xo. 728. I. O. O. P., and 
is a charter member of Star Camp, Xo. 1886, 
M. \V. A. of Cullom. 



SHERMAX H. JOKXSOX. 

Sherman H. Johnson, who is ])rominently 
identified with the agricultural interests of 
Germanville township, Livingston county, 
owns and operates a fine farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres on section 15. The 
neat and thrifty apjiearance of the place 
testifies to his careful supervision, and shows 
him to be not only a thorough and skillful 
farmer, but also a man of good business 
ability. 

Mr. Johnson was born in the town of 
Peru, Clinton county, Xew York, September 
13, 1847. ^ son of Jeremiah and Harriet 



(Bridges) Johnson. The father was born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, and resided there 
for some years. He enlisted in the war of 
1812, and served for five years under Gen- 
eral Scott, coming out of the service as first 
lieutenant. After receiving his discharge 
at Plattsburg, X'^ew York, he remained at 
that place and engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness, which he carried on until sixty-eight 
years of age, when meeting with loss from 
fire, he retired from active business. He 
died in 1872, at the age of ninety-two years, 
his wife in the same year at the age of 
eighty-two. In their family were twelve 
children, eight of whom are still living. Our 
subject is the youngest son, but has two 
younger sisters. 

In the common schools of his birthplace 
Sherman H. Johnson ac(|uired his educa- 
tion, and remained at home until eighteen 
years of age, when, in 1865, he came toLiv- 
ingston county. Illinois. After sjjending a 
few months in Belle Prairie township, how- 
ever, he went to Minnesota, where he worked 
by the month two years, and then returned 
to this county, being engaged in farming 
upon rented land in Belle Prairie township 
for a number of years. Subseciuently he 
leased a farm in McLean county, whicli he 
afterward bought, and on selling that prop- 
erty in 1876 went to Bates county. Missouri, 
where he followed farming one year. Re- 
turning to Belle Prairie township. Livingston 
county, he rented a farm for three years, 
and then moved to Forrest township, where 
he leased a half section of land for the same 
length of time. During the following three 
years we again find him in Belle Prairie 
township, and in 1888 he located upon his 
present farm in Germanville township^ He 
purchased two hundred and eighty acres, 
and two vears later sold one hundred and 



26S 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sixty acres to Henry Nettleton. but still owns 
the remainder, which was only partially im- 
proved w'hen it came into his possession, but 
he has since erected a lar^^e and substantial 
barn, improved the house, and tiled the land, 
placing it under excellent cultivation. In 
connection with general farming he raises 
considerable stock, including short-horn 
cattle and Poland China hogs. 

On the 7th of October, 1869, in Belle 
Prairie township, Mr. Johnson led to the 
marriage altar Miss Emeline Alford, a 
daughter of Wesly J. and Emiline C. 
(Randall) Alford. The father was born 
in Vermont, but when a small child moved 
with his parents to New York state, where 
he continued to make his home until Mrs 
Johnson was two years old, and then brought 
his family to Illinois, locating in Kendall 
county, where he engaged in farming for 
some time, but is now living a retired life in 
Rose Lawn, Indiana. He was a very prosper- 
ous man and highly respected. His wife died 
six years ago, leaving a family of seven 
children, of whom Mrs. Johnson is the fifth 
in order of birth. Ten children have been 
born to our subject and his wife, namely : 
William H.. a well-driller of Strawn, -who 
married Clara Johnson and has four chil- 
dren. Myrtle. Pearl. Elmer and Clarence 
Sherman ; Cornelia, wife of William Day, a 
farmer of Ford county, Illinois, by whom 
she has five children, Myron William. Sarah, 
Annie and Hershal A. ; Lorenzo. Hannah 
and Bertha, all at home; Myron, who died 
at the age of sixteen years ; Myra, who died 
in Missouri, at the age of three years ; and 
three, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Johnson is a supporter of the Repub- 
hcan party, and as a public-spirited and pro- 
gressive citizen is an advocate of those en- 
terprises that tend toward public develop- 



ment. He filled the ofifice of school director 
during the first seven years of his residence 
in Germanville township, and has efficiently 
served in the same capacity for the last three 
years, during which time he has done much 
toward bettering the schools in his locality. 
He is an active member of the Methodist 
church, in which he served as deacon four 
vears. 



JAMES J. BROADHEAD. 

James J. Broadhead, a prominent repre- 
sentative of the business interests of Forrest 
is a native of Illinois, his birth having oc- 
curred near Mackinaw, September 22, 1857. 
His father, Edward Broadhead, was born 
July 2, 1827, in Manchester. England, where 
he grew to manhood and learned the trade 
of a machinist. There he was married, 
March 6, 1847, to Miss Nancy McDonald, 
also a native of Manchester, and in 1855 
they came to the United States, locating first 
in Tazewell count}-, Illinois, where he found 
employment on a farm. In 1859 he settled 
near Danvers, McLean county, and com- 
menced farming on his own account. In 
1867 he purchased a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres of wild prairie land in For- 
rest township, Livingston ccnuity, for which 
lie paid fifteen dollars per acre, and for 
w hich he was later offered one hundred dol- 
lars per acre. He made all of the improve- 
ments upon the place, erecting a good set of 
farm buildings, tiling the land and placing 
it under excellent cultivation, and dividing 
it into fields of sufficient size by good hedge 
fences. He also planted trees and ornament- 
al shrubs, and made his farm one of the best 
in the locality. He continued to actively en- 
gage in agricultural pursuits until six or 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



269 



seven years before his death, wlien he nioveil 
to Forrest and hved retired, dying there 
Marcli 8, 1896. He purciiased a good resi- 
dence in that town, wliich is now the home 
of his widow. On coming to this country 
lie was in \ ery limited circumstances and his 
success tliat he acliieved in Hfe was due en- 
tirely to his well-directed labors. Politically 
he was always identified with the Republican 
party, and religiously was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, to which his 
wife also belongs. To them were born eight 
children. sc\en of whom are now liv- 
ing, namely : William, a resident of 
Xiinnal. Illinois ; John, of Chatsworth ; Mary 
J. resides with her nif^ther ; James J., our sub- 
ject; George H.. of Indiana; Cornelia, wife 
of W. B. Moyer, of Galva, Illinois; and 
Loxina, wife of J. L. Moyer. of Forrest. 
I he subject of this review was a lad of 
ten years when the family came to Liv- 
ingston county, and he attended both the 
country schools and those of Forrest. 
On the home farm he acquired an ex- 
cellent knowledge of agriculture, and on 
starting out in life for himself at the 
age of twenty-one years comiuenced 
farming, which occupation he fe)llowed 
with good success until his removal to 
Forrest, in 1897. He had previously spent 
two winters in town, those of 1893 and 
1894. He now conducts the only real estate 
office in the place, ar.d handles a large amount 
of city and farm property. He is also en- 
gaged in merchandising and the fire and life 
insurance business, and is a director of the 
Peoria Eastern Telephone Company, of 
which he was one of the original incorpora- 
tors and was an active member of the com- 
pany when the lines were put in operation. 
As a business man he is reliable, energetic 
and progressive, and generally carries for- 



ward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes. 

On the 20th of March, 1884, Mr. Broad- 
head was united in marriage with Miss Ella 
Rose, of Fairbury, a daughter of I. V. Rose, 
a farmer of Indian Grove township. Living- 
ston county, and to them have been born 
two children; Ralph R. and Ray V. The 
family have a pleasant home in Forrest and 
attend the Methodist Episcopal church, of 
which Mrs. Broadhead is a member. So- 
cially Mr. Broadhead is connected with the 
Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen 
ot Amreica, and the Court of Honor, and is 
now keeper of records and seals in the first 
named order. Since attaining his majority 
he has affiliated with the Republican party, 
and although he has never aspired to office 
he was elected trustee of the village, taking 
his seat May i, 1900. He is public-spirited 
and progressive and as a citizen ever stands 
ready to discharge any duty devolving upon 
him. 



THRONE & HATFIELD. 

Throne & Hatfield is the name of a well- 
known firm of Cullom, Illinois, comixtscd of 
Charles H. Throne and George H. Hatfield, 
tw(3 of the most enterprising and progress- 
ive business men of that town. They are 
successfull)' engaged in the livery business 
and also have control of the dray line. 

Mr. Throne is a native of Livingston 
county, born in .Sullivan township. Septem- 
ber 23. 1876, an<l is a son of W . H. and 
Laura E. ( Edwards) Throne, who were 
also born in this state. The father, who is 
a farmer by occupation, lived in Sullivan 
township many years, but for the jiast 
eighteen years has made his home in Cullom. 



270 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



His children are : Maggie, wife of B. A. 
Park, of Fisher, Illinois; Calvin, a general 
merchant of McCook, Nebraska; Bertha, 
wife of S. M. Boeman, of Cullom, Illinois; 
Nellie, wife of Frank Copp, of Fisher; 
Charles H., our subject; and Reta, at home. 

Mr. Throne was educated in the schools 
of Cullom, and at the age of thirteen years 
began his business career as clerk in the 
general store of Enos Flessner, of that place, 
remaining with him six j-ears, and with the 
firm of Flessner & Amachee four years. In 
1896, in connection with John Tyrrell, he 
purchased the livery stable and dray line 
of John Fritzon, and at the end of four 
months George H. Hatfield purchased Mr. 
Tyrrell's interest in the business, which has 
since been successfully conducted imder the 
firm name of Throne & Hatfield. In 1898 
Mr. Throne and B. A. Park purchased a 
livery and sale stable in Fisher, Illinois, 
which they carried on together until the 
spring of 1900, when our subject sold out 
to his partner. During all this time Air. 
Throne was still employed in the mercantile 
establishment of Flessner & Amachee, but 
in March, 1900, concluded to give his whole 
time and attention to the livery and dray 
business, which he has since done. 

On the 6th of September, 1899, Mr. 
Throne married Miss Jennie Kewley, a na- 
tive of Ford county, Illinois, and daughter 
of Thomas Kewley, one of its old settlers. 
She is second in order of birth in a family of 
five children. Politically Mr. Throne is a 
Republican, and socially is a member of 
Cullom Camp, No. 1886, M. W. A. 

Mr. Hatfield, the junior member of the 
firm, was born in Mona township. Ford 
county, Illinois, September 12, 1876, a son 
of Jesse S. and Sarah (Cart) Hatfield, na- 
tives of Indiana. The father carried on 



blacksmithing in Ford county until 1880, 
when he removed with his family to Cul- 
lom, where he opened a shop and has since 
conducted a successful business. He is a 
veteran of the Civil war. In his political 
^■iews he is a Democrat. He has two chil- 
dren : George H., our subject; and Edward, 
at home with his parents. 

George H. Hatfield received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Cullom. When 
about twenty-one years of age he embarked 
in the livery business with Mr. Throne ami 
has since devoted his energies to that en- 
terprise. They are wide-awake business 
men of known reliability, and are meeting 
with well-deserved success. Mr. Hatfield is 
a Republican in politics, anil is an acti\-e 
member of Star Camp, No. 1886, M. W. 
A., of Cullom, and Livingston Cnuntv 
Lodge, No. 264, K. P., of Chatsworth. 



ALPHA BAKER. 

Alpha Baker, an honored and highly 
respected citizen of Dwight, Illinois, who 
is now living a retired life, was born in 
Oneida county. New York, September 19, 
183 1, and is a son of Samuel A. and Sophia 
(Porter) Baker, who spent their entire lives 
in that county, where the father cleared and 
improved a good farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres. He was a most progressive and 
enterprising man and an excellent judge of 
good stock, to the raising of which he de- 
voted considerable attention. He died at 
about the age of sixty years, his wife at the 
age of seventy-seven. His father was Henry 
Baker, a ship carpenter in early life. Our 
subject is the second in order of birth in a 
familv of three children. Ellis, the oldest, 




A. BAKER. 




MRS. A. BAKER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



now seventy-two years of age, followed 
farming, and is now living on his old home 
farm in Xew York state. Hope, the young- 
est, died in girlhood. 

In the county of his nativity. Alpha 
Baker was reared and educated, and re- 
mianed under the parental roof until twen- 
ty-three years of age, when he Aent to Con- 
necticut, working three years in Hartford 
and New Haven counties. At the end of 
that time he moved to Warren, Ohio, where 
he worked about a }ear at anything lie 
could find to d6, and then cafne to Illinois, 
stopping in Grundy county from 1856 until 
1890. The winter of 1856-7 was spent in 
the lumber woods on the Eau Claire river, 
Wisconsin, but the following spring he re- 
turned to Grundy county. Illinois, where he 
worked by the month one year. He next 
rented a farm in Mazon township, which 
he operated three years, and then purchased 
a wild tract of one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he commenced immediately to im- 
prove and cultivate, erecting first a house, 
22x22 feet in dimensions and containing 
three rooms. 

Mr. Baker was married, September 25, 
1861, to Miss Sarah J. Collar, a native of 
St. Lawrence county. New York, and a 
daughter of Lyman and Eliza Jane (Crabb) 
Collar, also natives of that state. The 
father engaged in farming and also followed 
the wagon-maker's trade in St. Lawrence 
county until Mrs. Baker was eight years of 
age. when he came to Illinois with his fam- 
ily, locating in Grundy county, when it con- 
tained only a few houses and these widely 
scattered. He took up a tract of govern- 
ment land, to which he later added by pur- 
chase. He lived to the advenced age of 
ninety years. In his family were ten chil- 
dren, of whom five died young, namely: 



Addison. Jessie, Reuben, Frank and Har- 
riet. Those living are Norman, a resident 
of Iowa; George, of Joliet, Illinois; Alfred, 
of Iowa; Malinda, ' of Mazon township, 
Grundy county. Illinois; and Sarah J., wife 
of our subject. Eight chiitlren were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Baker, but four died in in- 
fancy. The others are Frank, who is now 
engaged in farming in Storm Lake, Iowa; 
Emery, a stock raiser of Lincoln county, 
Nebraska ; Stella and Ada Sigourney, at 
home. 

After his marriage Mr. Baker took up 
his residence upon the farm which he had 
previously purchased, and five years later 
added to it a tract of eighty acres and after- 
ward one hundred and twenty-six acres 
more. His landed possessions in Grundy 
county now aggregate six hundred and 
sixty-two acres, consisting of two hundred 
and forty acre's on section 12 and one hun- 
dred and sixty acres on section 24, High- 
land township; and one hundred and twen- 
ty-six on section 7, and one hundred and 
thirty-six acres on section 19, Goodform 
township. He also owns one hundred and 
ninety acres of improved land in York coun- 
ty, Nebraska, and ten lots in Dwight. In 
connection with general farming he always 
engaged in stock raising, but since Febru- 
ary, 1890, he has made his home in Dwight 
and lived retired, la3'ing aside all business 
cares. 

Fraternally Mr. Baker is a member of 
\'erona Lodge, No. 757, F. & A. M., of 
Verona, in which he has held office. He 
is idejjendent in politics, voting for the man 
whom he believes best qualified f(jr ofiice re- 
gardless of party lines. He efticiently 
served as commissioner of highways for 
two terms of three years each and put up 
the first iron bridges and stone abutments 



2/6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in Highland township during his term. For 
a number of years he and his wife have 
traveled in the west quite extensively, and 
can now take life easy after their earh' years 
of toil and privations. As a business man 
Mr. Baker has been remarkably successful, 
and his career affords an excellent example 
to the young in that he commenced life 
without capital, but having a determination 
to succeed he industriously applied himself 
until he has acquired a handsome property, 
and has also won the confidence and respect 
of his fellow men in a marked desfree. 



JAMES BROWN. 

The career of him whose name heads 
this review illustrates most forcibly the pos- 
sibilities that are open to young men who 
possess sterling business qualifications. It 
proves that neither wealth or the assistance 
of influential friends at the outset of his 
career are necessary to place him on the road 
to success. It also proves that ambition, 
perseverance, steadfast purpose and inde- 
fatigable industry, combined with sound 
business principles will be rewarded, and that 
true success follows individual effort only. 
For many years Mr. Brown was actively 
identified with the agricultural and stock 
raising interests of Livingston county, but 
is now living a retired life in Dwight. hav- 
ing accumulated a handsome competence 
through his own well directed efforts. 

He was born in Oneida county. New 
York, September 14, 1828, a son of David 
and Sophia (Mumford) Brown, the former 
a native of Scotland, the latter of Connecti- 
cut. When David Brown was ten years of 
age he was brought to America by his fa- 



ther, David Brown, Sr., a stocking weaver 
by trade, who settled in Herkimer county, 
New York, and in the midst of the forest 
cleared and developed a farm of one hundred 
acres, upon which he set out one of the finest 
orchards in the country. In those early 
days it often happened that he sold his best 
apples for six cents a bushel and farmers 
would come from miles around to get them. 
He also owned and operated a cider mill, 
maiuifacturing from two to three hundred 
barrels of cider in one season. He died at 
the age of si.xty-six years, his wife at the age 
of eighty. In their family were twelve chil- 
dren. Our subject's maternal grandfather. 
Captain William Mumford, of the Revo- 
lutionary war, died at the age of about sev- 
enty, while his wife lived to the advanced 
age of ninety-five years. To them were also 
born twelve children. After reaching man- 
hood. David Brown, Jr.. also followed 
farming and became quite well-to-do, being 
able to give his children good educational 
advantages. He died at the age of ninety 
years, while the mother of our subject de- 
parted this life at the age of forty-four. For 
his second wife he married Cornelia ]\Iarvin, 
but had no children by that marriage. By 
the first union nine children were born, 
seven of whom reached years of maturity, 
namely: Charlotte. Jeanette, Mary. David, 
James, John and Elizabeth. All are living 
with the exception of Jeanette, and all are 
residents of New York state except our sub- 
ject. 

During his boyhood James Brown at- 
tended the public schools of his native coun- 
t\- until fifteen years of age, when he went to 
live with his uncle. James Brown, a lawyer 
of Oswego, New York, who sent him to 
school and also assisted him in his algebra, 
geometry, trigonometry, philosophy and as 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



2-n 



tniiiomy at home during the evenings, in 
this way acquiring a good education. He 
was a student at tlie W'hitesboro Academy, 
L'tica, New York, for a time, and after 
leaving that institution tauglit scliool for six 
winters, while tlirough tlie summer montlis 
he engaged in farming. 

At the end of that time Mr. Brown liad 
saved one thousand dollars, which he invest- 
ed in cattle, and for fi\e years was success- 
fully engaged in the butcher business. He 
then went to Wayne county. New York, 
where he bought some dairy stock, which 
he shipped to Herkimer county, and from 
that time on was extensively interested in 
the stock business, traveling all o\er w estern 
New York and Canada buying dairy stock 
most of the time and shipping the same to 
every station from Bufifalo and Erie. 

Coming to Livingston county, Illinois, 
in 1867. Mr. Brown purchased an improved 
farm of one hundred and eighty acres in 
Nevada township but did not locate thereon 
until 1869, and the first year raised nothing 
as the season was so wet. He had married 
July 2"^, 1866, Miss Eudora Wood, a native 
of Oswego county. New York, and a daugh- 
ter of Moses Wood, one of the early settlers 
of that county and a successful farmer and 
cattle dealer. She was the second in order 
or birth in a family of twelve children, nine 
of whom grew to maturity. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brown had one son on coming to this coun- 
ty, and here the family circles was increased 
by the birth of seven other children. They 
were as follows : James, who died at the age 
of eighteen months ; Eva, who married Wil- 
bur Reed, a business man of Chicago, and 
has two children. James and George; Ade- 
laide, at home ; George, who is engaged in 
the stock business and resides at home : Ma- 
bel, who died at the age of three years : Da- 



vid, who died at the age of five years; 
Blanche, who is attending school in Dwight; 
and one who died in infancy. 

When he located here Mr. Brown had 
about one hundred steers, and being unable 
to buy corn to feed them he went to Mason 
county, where he purchased five thousand 
bushels and shipped to his home. He con- 
tinued to feed from one hundred and fifty 
to two hundred head of cattle each year un- 
til 1888, when he turned his attention to the 
raising of blooded stock, making a specialty 
of Norman draft horses, starting in this 
business with a capital of seven thou.sand 
dollars. He was interested in that enterprise 
until 1897, when he retired from business, 
having at that time ninety-five head of 
horses. He had previously given considera- 
ble attention to the raising of Poland China 
hogs, shipping about two hundred each year. 
He never sold any of the ^raiu Xhat he 
raised upon his land, but fed it all to his 
stock. He still owns eight hundred acres 
on sections 12, 13 and 24, Nevada township, 
and also has fourteen hundred acres of land 
in LaPorte county, Indiana, which he pur- 
chased in 1897. and which is partly improved 
and cultivated. He formerly owned lands 
in Kansas and Nebraska, but has since dis- 
posed of them. He has building ])roj>erty in 
l^wight. where he removed in November, 
1899, 'I'l'l 'i^s since made his home. Start- 
ing out in life for himself with no capital 
his success seems almost phenomenal, but it 
is due to his own industry, enterprise, per- 
severance and good management. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown hold membership 
in the Methodist Episcojial church, and he is 
identified with the Republican party, but 
has never taken an active part in politics 
aside from voting. ])referring to give his 
entire time and attention to his business in- 



278 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



terests. He and his wife have returned to 
New York on visits several times. After 
a useful and honorable career he can well 
afford to lay aside all business cares and 
live in ease and retirement, enjoying a well 
earned rest. 



SAMUEL HOKE. 



Samuel Hoke, deceased, was for many 
years prominently identified with the agri- 
cultural and business interests of Livingston 
county, and also took quite an active and in- 
fluential part in pubHc affairs, especially 
along educational lines. He became a 
resident of the county in 1859, coming here 
from Williamsburg, Blair county, Pennsyl- 
vania, then a part, of Bedford county, and 
spent his last days in Odell. 

Mr. Hoke was born in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, April 24, 1827, a son of 
Jacob and Margaret Rebecca Hoke, natives 
of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, whose parents 
came from Germany to America sometime 
during the eighteenth century. The father 
of our subject was a soldier of the war of 
18 12, and was a potter by trade, following 
that occupation in Gettysburg and McCon- 
nellsburg, Pennsylvania. Samuel was the 
youngest in his family c)f ten children, six 
sons and four daughters, of whom ^Irs. 
Julia Phenice, of Tacoma, Washington, is 
now the only survivor. 

In the common schools of his native 
county Sanuiel Hoke acquired his education 
and remained with his father until reach- 
ing man's estate. In early life he learned 
the trade of paper hanger and cabinet-maker 
in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and for 
eleven years worked at the same in that 
state. Taking an active part in political 



affairs, he sered as deputy sheriff of his na- 
tive county, school director and trustee. 

On the i8th of April, 1850, Mr. Hoke 
was united in marriage with Miss Laura 
M. Kenney, who was also born in Bedford 
county, November 22, i8ji, a daughter of 
Alexander W. and Hannah E. (Harvey) 
Kenney. Her ancestry were residents of 
Pennsylvania for many generations, and 
were among the first settlers of Philadel- 
phia. She is only one of a family of seven 
children now living.. Having received a 
good common school education, she success- 
fully engaged in teaching for several years, 
and also served as assistant in the postoffice 
at Williamsburg, of which her father was 
postmaster for twenty-five consecutive years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hoke were born si.x 
sons and one daughter, namely : ( i ) Alex- 
ander R. took a course at the Wesleyan Nor- 
mal School, of Bloomington, Illinois, and 
followed teaching for some time, but is now 
employed at the State Reformatory in Pon- 
tiac. He is married and has two children, 
Frank F. and Samuel L. (2) Hannah M. 
is the wife of J. W. Houchins, who was 
graduated at a college in Chicago and en- 
gaged in teaching during his active business 
career, but is now living retired in Odell. 
He owns a large amount of land in Illinois 
and Nebraska. (3) William E. is repre- 
sented on another page of this volume. (4) 
Charles H., who is now living in Pontiac 
and serving as deputy sheriff of the county, 
was formerly engaged in the undertaking 
business in Odell for some time, and has filled 
the offices of constable and collector. He 
is married and has one daughter, Georgetta 
D. (5) George K., a farmer and liveryman, 
died at his home in Odell from the effects 
of injuries received in the collapse of a 
brick Iniilding during a cyclone in 1886. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



279 



He was married and had one daughter, 
Laura R. (6) Samuel L., deceased, was 
graduated at the Odell high school in 1885, 
and the Xorthern Illinois Normal School at 
Dixon in 1886, and followed teaching for 
several years, but was preparing to enter the 
ministry at the time of his death in 1887. 
(7) Frank Lincoln, who lives at home with 
his mother, has a good education and is a 
harness maker by trade. He took the gov- 
ernment census in Odell in 1900. 

After his marriage Mr. Hoke continued 
to reside in Pennsylvania until 1859, when 
he sold his property there and came to 
Dwight, Illinois, where he was engaged in 
the furniture and undertaking business for 
six months. He then located on the farm 
i)-^ Odell township, which he had previously 
purchased, it being a tract of eighty acres 
of wild prairie land, whicli now forms a 
part of Union township. He erected build- 
ings thereon, made many other improve- 
ments, and added to his property until at 
one time he had five hundred acres of val- 
uable land, nearly all improved by himself. 
During the civil war he was drafted but hired 
a substitute, and met with excellent success 
in his business affairs during that period. 
Although his early training fitted him for 
far different work, he prospered in his farm- 
ing operations, being a man of sound judg- 
ment, observant and energetic. He made a 
specialty of the raising of horses and cattle, 
and was wonderfully successful. 

Mr. Hoke was one of the men who laid 
out the school districts of Union township, 
and his wife was one of the first teachers, 
conducting a school in their own home, in 
addition to taking care of her three chil- 
tiren. She taught six months for twenty 
dollars pkr month and with the money 
thus earned purchased their first horse. 



I'heirs was the third school house of the 
township, and was built on land donated by 
Mr. Hoke for that purpose. He served as 
school director and school trustee for many 
years, and was one of the influential Repub- 
licans of his community, with which party 
his sons also affiliate. For over twenty 
years he successfully engaged in farming, 
and in 1880 moved to Odell, purchasing the 
house now occupied by his widow. He 
sold one hundred and sixty acres of his 
land and engaged in the loan and real es- 
tate business, still retaining two hundred 
and forty acres of the original farm, which 
is all under a high state of cultivation. At 
the age of eighteen years Mr. Hoke joined 
the Sons of Temperance, and was also a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Presbyterian church, though 
he later in life attended the Congregational 
church. He died at his home in Odell, May 
23, 1898, honored and respected by all who 
knew him. His estimable wife still carries 
on the business left by him, and has met 
with excellent success in all her business 
ventures, being a woman of more than or- 
dinary business ability and sound judgment. 



JAY G. BARXHIZER, M. D. 

Jay G. Barnhizer, M. D., a prominent 
and successful homeopathic physician of 
Forrest, IlUnois, was born in Thornburg, 
Iowa, January 11, 1875, and is a son of 
Joseph and Samantha (Stout) Barnhizer. 
His paternal grandfather was Joseph Barn- 
hizer, a native of Holland and a soldier of 
the Revolutionary war, who lived to the ex- 
treme old age of one hundred and six years. 
The father was born, reared and educated 



28o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in Pennsylvania, and in early life went to 
Ohio, where he married Samantha Stout, 
a native of Leipsic, that state, of which place 
her father, Elisha Stout, was one of the 
pioneers and a wealthy farmer and miller. 
He was also one of the early members and 
a minister of the Christian church. In 1874 
the Doctor's parents moved to Coal Creek, 
Iowa. His father had been successfully 
engaged in milling in Ohio, and traded his 
milling property there for a half section of 
land near Thornburg, Iowa, which place he 
improved and operated with marked success 
until 1888, when he sold out and moved to 
California. After a short time spent in 
Pasadena, he returned to Iowa and pur- 
chased a farm adjoining Sigourney, in which 
town he lived until his death, which occurred 
April 9, 1898. He was quite wealthy, his 
capital being largely invested in stock. Re- 
ligiously both he and his wife were promi- 
nent members and active workers in the 
Christian church, and practically building 
the church at Sigourney. She died Decem- 
ber 9. 1893. 

Dr. Barnhizer obtained a good common - 
school education, graduating at the high 
school of Sigourney in the class of i8qi. 
and he then read medicine with Dr. F. A. 
Strawbridge, of that place in 1893 and 1894 
He took his first course of lectures in the 
medical department of the Iowa State Uni- 
versity at Iowa City, in the latter year, and 
was graduated at the Chicago Homeopathic 
Medical College in 1898, the same year tak- 
ing a post graduate course at that institu- 
tion. For a year he was engaged in practice 
at Oilman, Illinois, and in April, 1899, came 
to Forrest and opened an office. Although 
he has been here only a short time, he has 
already built up a large and constantly in- 
creasing practice, and the liberal patronage 



he enjoys attests his skill and ability in his 
chosen calling. He is examiner for the 
Court of Honor. On the 24th of October. 
1899, Dr. Barnhizer married Miss Eliza- 
beth D. Bond, of Sigourney, Iowa, a daugh- 
ter of Lorenzo D. Bond, and the young 
couple have already made many warm 
friends in their adopted city. 



WILLIAM T. GARDNER. 

William T. Gardner, dealer in hard- 
ware, stoves, tinware, staple and fancy gro- 
ceries, Chatsworth, Illinois, was born near 
Lawrence, Kansas. June 6, 1862, and is a 
son of John J. and Mary (Lambourne) 
Gardner, the former a native of Scotland and 
the latter of England. She is a sister of 
Mrs. D. B. Puffer, of Chatsworth. John 
P. Gardner emigrated from Scotlantl to 
Canada, where he resided for a time. He 
was a coal miner in the old country, and was 
engaged in that occupation for some years. 
From Canada he removed to Kansas where 
he engaged in farming, but later came to 
Illinois and located near Streator. where he 
remained a short time and then removed to 
Deer Park township. La Salle county : James, 
engaged in farming. He yet makes his 
home in that township, where he owns a 
farm of two hundred and fifty acres. His 
wife died in 1898. They were the parents 
of fourteen children, eight sons and six 
daughters, of whom two died in childhood, 
and Emma, in 1898, at the age of nineten 
years. The living are Matthew T., a farmer 
of Pleasant Ridge township. Livingston 
county; William T., the subject of this 
sketch: Mary, wife of Emerson Calkins, of 
La Salle ceuntv : lohn. living in Iowa Falls, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Iowa; Jennie, wife of Thomas Nicholson, 
hving in Iowa Falls, Iowa ; Fred, also of 
Iowa Falls ; Nellie, wife of L. Calkins, of 
Der Park township. La Salle county ; James, 
of Vermillonville, La Salle county: Char- 
lotte, wife of Roy Logfan. of La Salle county ; 
Sadie and George, residing at home witli 
their father. In politics John P. Gardner 
is a Democrat, hut has never sought or would 
serve in any official capacity. Religiously 
he is an Adventist. For several years he 
has heen living a retired life in X'ermillion- 
ville. 

The suhject of this sketch was but a 
small child when his parents removed to 
La Salle county, Illinois, and on his father's 
farm in that county he grew to manhood, 
and in the district schools he received his 
education. He remained at home until he 
was twenty-one years of age, when he came 
to Charlotte township, Livingston county, 
where he engaged in farming for himself. 
After remaining on that farm for two years 
he went hack to La Salle county, and, in 1885, 
was married to Miss Anna Hampson, who 
was horn near Washington. PennSyKania. 
and a daughter of Lindsey and Martha 
(Earl) Hampson, both of whom were also 
natives of Pennsylvania, where their mar- 
riage occurred. Tliey later moved to La 
Salle county, Illinois, but are now deceased. 
They had a family of three sons and three 
daughters, all of whom are living, as fol- 
lows: Mary, wife of William Eaton, ol 
Deer Park township. La Salle county; .\nna, 
wife of our subject : William. Clara, James 
and Minor, all of whom are living in La 
Salle county. 

After his marriage, Mr. Gardner engaged 
in farming on a forty-acre tract. He re- 
mained there for three years, left it, but re- 
turned and remained there five years longer, 



when he was compelled to give up farming. 
He then moved to Chats worth, purchased 
a lot, erected a building and opened up in 
the restaurant and hotel business on the 
15th of August, 1893. He continued in 
that business very successfully until Novem- 
ber. 1898. when he closed out and put in 
a stock of hardware and groceries. He 
now carries a full line of shelf and heavy 
hardware, stoves and tinware, staple and 
fancy groceries, and is doing a good business. 
Owning the building in which his store is 
located, his expenses are light, and he can 
and does compete with stores in the larger 
towns. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gardner ha\e l)een 
born five children, as follows: Gertrude, 
Edith. Edna. Ola and Leslie J., all of 
whom are jmpils in the public schools, with 
the e.xception of the last named. 

In politics Mr. (lardner is a Denii crat, 
and while he has in\ariably refused to ac- 
cept public office, was elected a memljer ;)f 
the board of education in 1900. Fraternally 
lie is a member of Camp No. 1829, M. W. 
.\. He is on the working team in his camp, 
and takes great interest in its proceedings. 
.\s a citizen he is enterprising and progress- 
ive, ever willing to do his share in advancing 
the welfare of his adopted city and county. 



WILLI. \M S. SKIXXER. M. D. 

William S. Skinner, M. 1).. a prominent 
and successful i)hysician and surgeon of For- 
rest, Illinois, was born in London. Ontario, 
Canada, January 20. 1872, and is a son of 
George R. and Dina (Reeves) Skinner, na- 
tives of the same place. His paternal grand- 
father. Rev. James Skinner, a Presbyterian 
minister, removed from Scotland to Canada 



282 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in 1837, and for twenty-six years was pas- 
tor of a church in the township of London, 
Ontario. He also served as superintend- 
ent of schools for Middlesex county a num- 
ber of years, and died there about 1866. 
The Doctor's maternal grandfather, \\'ill- 
iam Reeves, was a native of England, an 
early settler of London, Canada, where he 
followed the occupation of farming through- 
out life. The father of our subject engaged 
in the same pursuit, and became quite an 
extensive dealer in real estate in Dakota. 
He is now a resident of Manitoba, where he 
conducts a large stock and grain farm. In 
his family of seven children the Doctor is 
the second in order of birth. 

Dr. Skinner began his education in the 
public schools of London, Ontario, and spent 
three years at the Collegiate Institute. He 
next attended the AVestern Medical College, 
of London, one year and then entered the 
medical department of the Northwestern 
University, at Chicago, where he took a full 
three-years" course, during which time he 
was assistant to Professor McDiarmiel, who 
occupied the chair of gynecology and ob- 
stetrics in the Post-Graduate School. He 
was graduated in 1899 and took a competi- 
tive examination fur a position in the Ly- 
ing-in Hospital, and standing third highest 
was resident physician there for a time. He 
then came to Forrest and opened an office, 
buying the practice of an old physician. He 
has had a remarkably successful career for 
so young a man and his practice is steadily 
increasing. His practice now is of a general 
character, tending toward a specialty in sur- 
gery. The Doctor is now a member of the 
board of health of Forrest and assistant 
physician for the Wabash and Toledo, Pe- 
oria and Warsaw Railroads, in which ca- 
pacity he does much work. 



On the 4th of Xovember, 1899, Dr. 
Skinner was united in marriage with Miss 
Mabel Cracraft, of Forrest, formerly of 
Wilmington, Illinois. She is a well-edu- 
cated lady and has successfully engaged in 
teaching school. Both the Doctor and his 
wiie are active members of the Congrega- 
tional church, and she is now serving as sec- 
retary of the Ladies" Aid Society and holds 
the same office in the Eastern Star. Fra- 
ternally the Doctor is a member of the }iIod- 
ern Woodmen of America. He is the med- 
ical examiner for the Laiion Central Life In- 
surance Company, of Cincinnati. 



WILLIAM LOUIS RABE, M. D. 

William Louis Rabe, M. D., is a skilled 
ph}'sician and surgeon of Dwight, whose 
knowledge of the science of medicine is 
broad and comprehensive, and whose ability 
ill applying its principles to the needs of suf- 
fering humanity has gained him an enviable 
prestige in professional circles. 

The family to which the Doctor belongs 
was founded in America by his paternal 
grandfather, Jacob Rabe, a native of Ger- 
many, who came to this country when a 
young man prior to the war of 1812. His 
ancestors had for many generations been 
widely known throughout Prussia, and two 
of his brothers were publishers at Berlin. 
On his arrival in America he located on a 
tract of land near what was then the unim- 
portant little town of Monongahela, Penn- 
sylvania, where he spent the remainder of 
his life as a farmer. There he married 
and reared a family of three children, and 
was a soldier of the war of 188 12. Being 
a temperate man and of good habits, he 




WILLIAM LOUIS RABE, M. D. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



285 



lived to the extreme old age of one Inindred 
years and three months, and preserved his 
mental and physical strength tn a rcniark- 
ahle decree. He was noted tHr his indns- 
try and intet^rity. and whether at home or 
ami)n<j his neighhors nreserxcd that C(|na- 
nimity of temper and welUhred manner 
w hich at once singled him out as a gentleman 
hy birth and breeding. The celebrated 
opera singers, the Rabe sisters, belonged 
to the same family, and were widely known 
throughout Europe, where they made a for 
tune l)y their talent, who in the early '30s an<l 
"4OS twice crossed the Atlantic to ]>lcasc and 
delight the (iothaniilcs with the songs and 
melodies of h'atlierland. 

John Rahe, the Doctor's father, was 
born on the old homestead near .Mmionga- 
hela, Pennsylvania, and in the schools of 
tliat locality iitted himself for the teacher's 
profession, which he followed for some 
lime, also farmed during .summer. On 
reaching manhood he married i\liss Eliza- 
beth Luce, also a nati\e of Pennsylvania, 
and to them were born the following chil- 
li ren : Melesendra, wife of Dr. Henry Mor- 
rison, of Pittsbure; Amanda, wife of Samuel 
A. Erederick, of Ohio; Maria, who diet! at 
tiie age of sixteen years: Hiram, a capitalist 
of Clyde, Ohio; John, a physician of Mo- 
nongahela, Pennsyhania ; and William L., 
our subject. In 1820 the father moved with 
his family t(j Jefferson county, Ohio, and 
I'urchased a farm, which continued to be his 
home until called to his final rest in 1872. 
1 le was a man of more than ordinar\- abilitw 
and was at once recognized as a valuable 
addition to the community. Religiously 
he was a prominent member of the Presby- 
terian church, and politicall_\- was first a 
Whig and later a Republican. As one of 

the leading citizens of his township he was 
16 



called u])on to fill \arious local offices. He 
sought to wield a healthy influence over his 
children, to whom he gave a liberal educa- 
tion and encouraged them in the e.xercise 
oi those virtues by which they became valued 
and reputable citizens. 

William J-ouis Rabe was born near 
Steubenville, Ohio, May 8, 1839. His ele- 
mentary education was conducted chiefiy by 
his father, an intelligent farmer and teacher. 
■Snb.sequently he was thoroughly trained in 
the higher branches, first taking a course in 
Richmond College and then matriculating in 
the Cleveland Medical University. He be- 
gan the practice of his profession at Wells- 
ville, Ohio, the larger portion of w Inch was 
on the Virginia side of the Ohio river. Dur- 
ing the ci\il war he served as assistant sur- 
geon with the Union forces, and was 
wounded upon the occasion of General Mor- 
gan's capture in Columbiana county. As 
hostilities drew to a clo.se, in common with 
other industrious citizens he prepared to re- 
sume the occuijations of peace. Eor a time 
his decision wa\ered between the adoption 
of the clerical and the medical professions. 
In 1862 he was chosen president of the Rich- 
mond (Ohio) College, which position he 
resigned after filling it two terms. In iS()5 
he entered both the McCormick Theological 
Seminary and Rush Medical College, of 
Chicago, two years thereafter receiving a 
diploma from each of the institutions named. 
After his graduation he was honored with 
calls from the First Presljyterian church, of 
Hloomington, Illinois, Ahuioon. Illinois, an.] 
LaPorte, Lidiana. In i^()j he located at 
the place first named and remained there 
nine years, when he removed to Dwight to 
engage in the practice of medicine. Here 
for more than twenty years he has given 
faithful and effective attention to his pro- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



fessional duties, and has esta1)lished one of 
the largest and most hicrative practices to 
be found in the interior of the state. He is 
a constant reader of the best medical litera- 
ture of the (lay. to which he is also a valued 
contribute ir. He is a member of the state, 
inter-state and national societies, and cor- 
respondent of the World's Medical Con- 
gress. He has repeatedly deliveretl ad- 
dresses before medical associations. The 
following is an e.xtract from an adilress 
made before the Inter-State Association: 
•'Gentlemen or Brothers — Wise and learned 
as we are supposed or ought to be — walking 
or moving thesaurus of medical knowledge, 
can anyone answer satisfactorily why nr of 
what a pain is? Why are so many so se- 
riously sick? Or most of all, why do so 
many die?" 

Conservati\-e in medical practices as he 
is, in theory he is always respecting and try- 
ing a new remedy. He never discharges an 
old soldier (so to speak) in old attire for a 
recruit in costlier dress, until he knows the 
latter can mure quickly wound or kill one 
or more of the twenty-five hundred diseases 
that not nnlv afflict hut by which mankind 
ultimately dies. He has a bitter hatred of 
artful or underhanded dealing of any kind; 
is in fact an uncompromising but honest 
fighter when he believes he is in the right or 
has been unjustly assailed. A case in point 
was the protracted contest which was waged 
against him by the Keeley Company. A 
jjost graduate of the Keeley Institute, and 
at the same time an attorney for the same, 
had him called before the United States 
court fi>r a technical violation of the reve- 
nue laws. The Doctor was asked to plead 
for himself and in ten minutes his case was 
dismissed, the United States district at- 
torney emphasizing the fact by the remark ; 



"This is a vindication of a noble man." The 
closing period of Dr. Rabe"s address was as 
follows: "If there is any secret oath re- 
corded as I know on earth, and I trust in 
heaven, it is that I am a good Templar. And 
more: I have on my body the mark .of a 
wound out of which blood fiowed. more 
than several drops of l)lood. over thirty 
years ago, in defense of a country the best 
of which history gives any record. Now 
please do not even intimate when I am get- 
ting old and gray and feel I am verging to- 
wards the close of active life, that I should 
for any cause be forgetful of the past, recre- 
ant to sacred duty; in a word, be a semi- 
traitor to tlie strong, lasting, lienefiicent 
government that not only protects mj- prop- 
erty, but graciously shields and preser\-es 
my person." The secjuence of the case was 
the dismissal of the attorney by the ctmi- 
pany, and they in turn were siuiimoned by 
the people to appear before the bar of one 
of the lower and higher courts of the com- 
monwealth of Illinois for actual violation of 
law and good order. 

In 1S67 Dr. Rabe was married to Miss 
Emma Clay Temple, of Bloomington, Illi- 
nois, whose parents were natives of Vir- 
ginia, and lineal descendants of the I'arke 
Curtis (Martha Washington) family. Mrs. 
Rabe died in August, 1888, leaving four 
children: Mildred T., born July 17, 1868, 
is the widow of Leonard How lett, of Syra- 
cuse, New York, ' anil a resident of that 
place; William L., born October 8, 1869, is 
connected with the Chicago & Alton Railroad 
and is a resident of Washington, Illinois; 
Clarence Parke, born January 10, iSjJ, is 
connected with the firm of Nicolas Cramer 
& Company, dealers in real estate, insurance 
and loans, of Chicago: Lucy E., born Jan- 
uary Ji, 1S74. is at home. All lia\e l>een 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



287 



provided with good educational advantages, 
and Mrs. Howlett studied music for two 
years under Professor Phelps, of Chicago. 
Both she and her sisters are singers of unu- 
sual ahility. The former is and has been 
for several years a salaried soloist in the 
First Presbyterian church, of Syracuse. Xew 
York, devoting herself to concert and church 
service, or engagements. 



J.XMES .McCOK.MICK. 

James McCormick. one of the early set- 
tlers and highly respected citizens of Living- 
.stnn county, who is now living a retired life 
in the village of Strawn. Fayette township, 
is a native of this state, born in La Salle 
county, October 21, 1837. and is a son of 
Alfred and Amanda ( Downerd ) McCor- 
mick. His paternal grandfatlier was Charles 
McCormick, a native of County Tyrone. 
Ireland, who, on coming to this country at 
an early day, settled in Fayette ounty, Penn- 
sylvania, where his three sons and two 
daughters were born and reared. He went 
to La Salle county. Illinois, with the father 
of our subject, and engaged in farming in 
Farm Ridge township for many years, but 
died in Bruce township at the age of 
se\enty-three years. His wife, who 
survived him several years, died in 
the same place and was laid to rest by his 
side. Alfred McCormick was born in Fay- 
ette county, Pennsylvania, about 1808, and 
remained there until twenty-five years of 
age. assisting his father in the work of the 
farm. In 1833 he moved to La Salle coun- 
ty. Illinois, and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of. government land in Farm 
Ridge township, wJiich property he improved 



and made his home for about eight years. 
On selling out he bought another farm in 
the .same township, and lived there for a 
number of years, when he disposed of that 
place and moved to Streator. where he spent 
the last ten years of his life in retirement 
from active labor, dying there in 1886. He 
was a consistent member of the Methodist 
church, which his family attended, and was 
a life-long Democrat, but never sought nor 
held ])ublic oftice. He was a public-spirited 
man, an advocate of ail that would tend to 
advance or im])rove the community in which 
he lived. His wife survived him about three 
years, and also died in Streator. Of their 
eleven children, eight are still living, our 
subject being the second in order of birth. 

Until he attained his majority James Mc- 
Cormick lived with his parents, assisting in 
the farm work and attending the common 
schools of La Salle county. He then en- 
gaged in farming for himself upon rented 
land in that county until after the Civil war 
broke out. when he enlisted at Ottawa, in 
.\ugust. 1862, in Company E. One Hundred 
and Fourth Illinois V'olunteer Infantry. 
At Hartsville. Tennessee, he was taken 
prisoner, and held for about si.\ months 
before being exchanged. Returning home 
sick, he was finally discharged at Ottawa, in 
the winter of 1863. 

-After recovering his health Mr. McCor- 
mick came to Livingston county, where for 
a year he worked by the month for Mr. 
Morgan, one of the earliest settlers of the 
county, and for the same length of time 
herded cattle where the town of Strawn now 
stands. He next engaged in farming for 
himself in Fayette township, and followed 
that occupation continuously for twenty 
years. For four years he was then engaged 
in the liquor business in Strawn, and at 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Kangley. La Salle county, ten years, after 
which he returned to Strawn. where he con- 
tlucted a saloon one year, but since tliat time 
has lived a retired life, enjoying the fruits 
of former toil. Since attaining his major- 
ity Mr. McCormick has always affiliated 
with the Democratic party, and is a member 
of the Roman Catholic church of Strawn, to 
which his family also belong. He is widely 
and favorably known and has many friends 
throughout Livingston and La Salle coun- 
ties. 

In Farm Ridge township. La Salle coun- 
ty, Mr. McCormick was married. February 
4, 1858, to Miss Jane Conelly, a native of 
Oswego, New Ynrk, and the thirtl in order 
of birth in a family i)f ten children, seven of 
who are still living. Her parents were 
Michael and ALirgaret (Coregan) Conelly. 
Her father, who was a miller by trade, died 
in Oswego, at the age of thirty years, but 
her mother li\-ed to the advanced age of 
ninety and died in Fayette township. Living'- 
ston county. September 24. 1899. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McCormick were born 
the following children: (i) Thomas P. 
died at the age of two months. (2) Ed- 
ward, an engineer on the Union Pacific Rail- 
road and a resident of Pittsburg, Kansas, has 
been married three times, his first wife being 
Mary Saughnessey, by whom he had four 
children : James ; Thomas, who died at the 
age of sixteen years; William and Edna 
Jane, who both died in infancy. His second 
wife was Florence Lossing and to them were 
born two children, Ruth and Edith. His 
present wife was Delia Otterman. (3) 
Maggie is the widow of Thomas Smoot, a 
telegraph operator of Strawn, where she is 
now keeping a boarding house. She had three 
children : Robert, Maude and Thomas, all 
living; and Catherine, deceased. (4) Min- 



nie is the wife of William A. Somers, of 
Strawn. and they had nine children, namely : 
Frank, Elizabeth J., Geneva, Wiliiarii. Peter, 
Katie. Cora. Alarie and William. 2nd. (5) 
Rose, the first white child born in Fayette 
township, Livingston county, is the wife of 
James Keeley, a farmer of Forrest township, 
and they have seven children : Edward, 
Maggie. Thomas, May, Agnes, Teresa and 
James. (6) Cora died at the age of nine 
months. (7) Agnes is the wife of W. A. 
Myers, of Chicago, superintendent of the 
Harlem race track. (8) Lizzie is at home. 
(9) Teresa is now teaching in the public 
schools of Sibley, and also taught in Kangley 
five years. ( 10) Katie dietl at the age of 
two years and four months. (.11) Martha 
is the wife of Elmer Davis, a farmer oi For- 
rest township, and they have two children, 
Josephine and Jane Frances. 



AUGCSTl-S ROBINSON. 

Augustus Robinson, who for a third of a 
century has been prominently identified with 
the agricultural interests of Broughton town- 
ship, Livingston county, his home being on, 
section 30, is a native of Illinois, born in La 
Salle county, October 24, 1840, and is a 
son of James and Sophia (Richey) Robin- 
son, who were born in Ohio, in 181 5 and 
1 818, respectively, and when young came to 
this state with their parents, settling in La 
Salle county during the Indian troubles. 
There the families engaged in farming un- 
der great difficulties, hauling their wheat 
to Chicago markets. The grandparents of 
our subject all died in La Salle county upon 
land which they had taken up from the gov- 
ernment. His grandfather, Nathaniel Richey. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



289 



served as a private in the war of 181 2. Our 
subject's parents were married in La Salle 
county and settled on government lantl 
where they made their home throughout life, 
the father dying June 2, 1899, the mother 
in 1864. He was a radical Republican in 
politics, but never took an active part in po- 
litical affairs, however, and both were earn- 
est and consistent members of the Congre- 
gational church. Augustus was their old- 
est child, the others being Priscilla. wife of 
Ellison Shepherd, a farmer of La Platte, 
Missouri; Alexander, a farmer of High- 
more, South Dakota: Andrew J., a resident 
of Granville, Illinois; Eva S., wife of R. N. 
West, of Mexico, Missouri; Jolin 11.. who 
is living near that place; James \'., wim lives 
near Geneva. Nebraska; and Sophia, wife 
of William E. Hoke, of Odell. 

Augustus Robinson is indebted to the 
public .schools of La Salle county for his 
early educational advantages. He remained 
upon the home farm until he attained his 
majority, and then enlisted in 1862 in Com- 
pany B, One Hundred and Fourth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. He followed his regi- 
ment to the Cumberland mountains, where 
he was taken ill and assigned to other duty. 
He participated in the battle of Nashville, 
and was honorably discharged in July, 1865. 
After his return home he rented land and 
lived near his parents until his marriage. In 
1866 he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of unimproved land in Broughton 
township, Livingston county, but did not lo- 
cate thereon until two years later. It was 
canal land, which by hard work and skill- 
ful management he has transformed into one 
of the most productive and best improved 
farms n{ the locality. .\s he succeeded he 
added another one hundred and eighteen 
acres to his farm, and now has two hundred 



and seventy-eight acres on section 30 under 
a high state of cultivation. He has made 
a specialty of stock raising, devoting his at- 
tention principaljy to hogs. 

Mr. Robinson was united in marriage 
January 9, 1868, with Miss Alice Hayward, 
who was born in county Kent, England. 
August 25, 1842, and about 1850 emigrated 
to Toronto, Canada, with her parents, John 
and Mary (Waghorne) Hayward. In 1866 
she came to La Salle county, Illinois. Her 
parents made their home in Saugatuck, 
Michigan, but her father died while on a 
visit at the home nf our subject. Mr. and 
Mrs. Robinson have live children : ( i ) 
William A., who lives near Kirksville. Mis- 
souri, married Edith Gilbert, daughter of 
C H. Gill)ert. of Emington, Illinois, and 
they have four children. Elsie G., Lael F., 
Clyde A. and Mary A. (2) Mattie 1.. who 
was educated at 01)erlin College, is the wife 
of Dr. C. P. Wikoff. a prominent physician 
of Emington. and they have one daughter, 
Alice F. (3) Gertrude took a course of 
music at Wheaton College, and is ncnv at 
home. (4) Horace E., who operates a 
part of his father's farm, married .Alice 
Drew, (laughter of Thomas Drew, of Eming- 
ton. and they have two ciiildren, Harland 
Drew and Irving Clare. ( 5 ) Charles .\. 
is at home. 

Politically Mr. Robinson is a stanch Re- 
publican, and has held nearly every office 
in the township, serving as collector, assessor 
and supervisor one term each, and school 
treasurer .since 1875. He takes quite an 
active and prominent part in local politics, 
and has been a delegate to state and county 
conventions of his party. Fraternally he is 
a member of the Grand .\rmy Post of Saune- 
min; and religiously is a member of the 
Congregational church, of which he is treas- 



>90 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



urer and trustee. He is a worthy Christian 
gentleman, well liked by all who know 
him. 



ELIAS HARTMAN. 

Elias Hartman, a prosperous and sub- 
stantial farmer residing on section 23, Sulli- 
van township, Livingston county, Illinois, 
was born in Tazewell county, this state, July 
20, 1842, a son of Peter and Agnes (Hart- 
man) Hartman, who, though of the same 
name, were not related prior to their mar- 
riage. They were natives of Germany, and 
shortly after their marriage emigrated to 
the new world, locating first in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania. Not long afterward 
they went to Ohio, and after a short time 
spent in that state came to Tazewell county, 
Illinois, where they were numbered among 
the early settlers. There the father pur- 
chased land and engaged in farming until 
his death. In the family were si.x children : 
Ann, who died young; Henry, a resident of 
Tazewell county; Elias, our subject; Ben- 
jamin, deceased, who spent his entire life in 
Tazewell county; Sarah and Emanuel, still 
residents of that county. 

The subject of this review began his edu- 
cation in an old log school-house in Tazewell 
county, one mile from his boyhood home, 
where he pursued his studies for two months 
tluring the winter, and later walked two 
miles to school through timber, over hills 
and hollows. At intervals he attended 
school through the winter as he had oppor- 
tunity until about twenty years of age, and 
thus acquired a good practical education. 
His father had died when the family was 
young, and he remained at home with his 
mother until he attained his majority, and 



then commenced farming on a small tract 
of land for himself, at the same time assist- 
ing in the management of the home jjlace. 
In 1866 he came to Livingston and bouglit 
a forty-acre tract of land adjoining the 
eighty acres of raw prairie land purchased 
by his mother, and that year broke both 
places. As he was unmarried he returned 
to the old home in Tazewell county each 
winter for four years., and in the spring 
would resume his farming operations here. 
On the _'4th of January, i8ji. Mr. Hart- 
man was united in marriage with AIiss Sarah 
Shell}', a native of Butler cinint}-, Pennsyl- 
\ania. and a daughter of Henry and Marga- 
ret ( Drushel ) Sholly who was also born in 
that county, and spent his last days in Kan- 
kakee county, Illinois. She is the second in 
order of birth in a family of five children, 
the others being Elizabeth, wife of Emanuel 
Hartman, of Tazewell; Reinhard, a resident 
of Round Grove township. Livingston coun- 
ty; Matilda, wife of Albert Wild, of Ogle 
count}-, Illinois; and Mar}-, who died at 
about the age of ten years. Of the twelve 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hartman 
one died in infancy. The others are Mar- 
tha, wife of Elias Christophel, residing on 
section 12, Sulli\'an township, Livingston 
county; Henry, who married Ida Engle and 
lives in Tazewell county; Peter, a resident of 
Li\ingsti)n county; Margaret, wife of John 
Diebel, li\ing on section 22. Sullivan town- 
ship; and John, Emanuel. Levi, .\manda, 
Ilarvev, Reuben and Lewis, all at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Hartman moved 
into a house on his mother's' eighty-acre 
farm in Livingston county, and three years 
later built his present residence on his own 
land. A year or two after making the first 
purchase he bought another forty acres, and 
in course of ten vears bought the eighty 



THE BlOGRArHlCAL RECORD. 



291 



acres lielonging to his mother, so that hs 
owned all of the northeast quarter of sec- 
tion 23, Sulhvan townsliip. lie lias since 
hought eighty acres on section 14, and the 
southwest quarter of section 22. making- 
four hundred acres, lacking one acre, un 
which the school-house is located, and the 
track (if the Illinois Central Railroad, which 
runs through one quarter-section, lie is a 
thorough and skillful farmer, a man of good 
business ability and sound judgment, and 
has met with well-merited success in his 
farming operations. Both Mr. antl .Mrs. 
llartman are members of the .Mennoniic 
church, of Cullom, and he is indepenilcnl 
in politics, voting for the men best (jualitied 
for the ])ositii)ns regardless of party lines. 



JOSEPH KLXTZ. 

Joseph Kuntz, a highly esteemed and 
hiinored citizen of Strawn, Livingston coun- 
ty, Illinois, was born in Alsace, France, 
July I'l, 1825, and is a son of Michael and 
r>;irl);u"a (I'mcli) Kuntz, who spent almost 
their entire li\es as farming penpk- in Ba- 
\aria, (iermany, going there in iSjy. 
in their family were ti\e children, namely; 
Jacnl). h'rederick, Joseph, Alagdalena and 
Barbara. 

The early life of owv subject was spent 
in his native land, but in 1865 he crossed 
the broad Atlantic and took up his residence 
in Tazewell county, Illinois, where he en- 
gaged in farming until coming to Livingston 
county, in 1868. He then purcha.sed one 
lunidred and sixty acres on section 18. Fay- 
ette township, to which he added from time 
to time until he became the owner of seven 
hundred and twentv acres of rich and arable 



land, having one of the largest and best 
improved farms in the county. In connection 
with general farming he engaged in stock 
raising quite e.xtensivel}', and in all his un- 
dertakings met with most gratifying suc- 
cess. He has c\er been found upright and 
honorable in all his dealings, and the pros- 
[jcrity that has ct)me to him is certainly 
well (leser\ed. 

On the jth of .\pril, 1836, Mr. Kuntz 
married Miss Barbara Meister, who was 
;dso horn in (iermany, September 17, 1837, 
and to them were born the following chd- 
dren : ( i ) Peter, a resident of Fayette town- 
ship, married Elizabeth Garboge, and they 
have six children, Joseph, William, Her- 
mann, Clara, Catherine, llallie and an in- 
fant daughter. ( _' ) Joseph, a resident of 
Ford county, Illinois, married j-'lizabeth 
Kanauer. and has one son, I-'rank. (3) Hen- 
ry, a farmer of McLean county, married 
Emma l-'nday. (4) .Mary is now the wife of 
liric .\. (lullberg, mentioned below. (5) 
Susan is the wife of Henry W'itzburger, a 
farmer of P'ayette tow^nship, Livingston 
county, and they have one daughter, Stella. 
( ()) -Mbert married .Sarah .Schrine and re- 
sides in Ford county, (j) John married 
Lena .Schrine and resides on the home farm 
of .Mr. Kuritz. (8| Kiltie married Andrew 
Roth and the_\- li\e in b'ord count)-. ( <; ) Rosa 
married dustolph Uingle, and resides in 
.Straw n. 

.Mr. Kuntz and his family are dexout 
members of the Catholic church, and are 
people of jiromincnt-e in the communities 
where they reside. Politicaly he is identi- 
fied with the Democratic [)arty, and has ever 
taken a deep and commendable interest in 
public affairs. He lilled the oftice of road 
commissioner two terms and school director 
for the same length of time. 



292 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Eric N. Gullberg, one of the leading 
business men of Strawn, was born in the 
southern part of Sweden, January i8, 1858, 
a son of Nels and Anna (Olson) Erickson. 
For about eighteen years the father was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of shoes, conduct- 
ing a large shop and emploj'ng seven or 
eight hands. On retiring from that business 
he turned his attention to farming, which he 
followed for many years. He died at his 
home in Sweden, in 1881, at the age of 
sixty-five years, and tiie mother departed 
this life in 1895, ^t the age of eighty-one. 
In their family were six children, three of 
whom are still living, namely : Peter N. 
Erickson, who is now engaged in the shoe 
business in St. Paul, Minnesota : Nellie 
Erickson, who is unmarried and still resides 
in Sweden ; and Eric N. Gullberg, our sub- 
ject. 

Mr. Gullberg was reared and educated in 
Sweden, attending the high school of his 
birth-place. He worked on his father's 
farm until seventeen years of age, and then 
entered the Swedish army, serving five years 
as a corporal in a cavalry regiment, and 
during his vacations was employed in a 
wholesale house in Sullvesburg. On enter- 
nig the army he changed his name from 
Erickson to Gullberg, which was the name of 
one of his cousins, and has since retained 
the latter. In 1883 he embarked in the gro- 
cery business in Pukawic, but his store was 
destroyed by fire in August, 1885, and he lost 
all he had. He then worked in a grocery 
store until coming to the United States 
April 15. 1890. He made his home in Chi- 
cago until March, 1891, and then went to 
Goodland, Indiana, where he worked on a 
farm for nearly a year. On the 3d of Febru- 
ary, 1892, he came to Strawn, and after 
being employed as a farm liand for about 



four years, he embarked in the liquor busi- 
ness in that village, which he still carries on 
with good success. 

On the 23d of August, 1898, in Strawn, 
Mr. Gullberg was imited in marriage with 
Mrs. Mary L. Benway. daughter of Joseph 
Kuntz. and widow of Joseph Benway, by 
whom she had three children, all still liv- 
ing, namely : Albert J., Oscar W. and Will- 
iam J. In his political views Mr. Gullberg 
is a Republican, and in his social relations is 
a member of Payson Lodge, No. 705. 1. O. 
O. F.. and Fayette Lodge, No. 458, K. P., 
of Strawn. He has passed all the chairs in 
both orders, and is now secretary and repre- 
sentative in the former and master of ex- 
chequer in the latter, having held the last 
named office for the past three years. He is 
also a prominent member of the Living- 
ston County Liquor Dealers' Association, 
and has been treasurer of the same since its 
oroanization. 



CHARLES H. HOKE. 

Charles H. Hoke, chief deputy sheriff 
of Livingston county, and one of the lead- 
ing citizens of Pontiac, was born in Union 
township, this county, June 28, 1861, a son 
of Samuel and Laura X. (Kenney) Ploke. 
The father was born in Bedford county. 
Pennsylvania, and there grew to manhood 
and learned the cabinet-maker's trade. The 
mother was a native of Williamsburg, the 
same state, and a dughter of a Mr. Kenney, 
a well-kn(3wn attorney of that place. Three 
of their children were born in Penn.sylvania 
before the family came to Illinois. There 
the father conducted a large furnture and 
undertaking establishment, but on account of 
failing health be was obliged to discontinue 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



293 



tlie lousiness. Selling" his store, lie came to 
Livingston county, Illinois, in 1859, and 
purchased eighty acres of land in Uninn 
township for eight dollars per acre. In tlie 
house he erected thereon his wife taught the 
first school in the township, having pre- 
viously eneaged in teaching in her nati\e 
state. He turned his attention to the im- 
provement and cultivation of his land, and 
so successful was he in his farming opera- 
tit)ns that he added to his place until he had 
four hundred acres, two hundred and forty 
acres of which is still in possession of the 
family. He tiled the land and converted it 
into < )ne of the hest farms of the county. He 
took a prominent and active part in puhlic 
atYairs. especially along educational lines, 
serving as a school directt)r and memher of 
the hoard for many years. He also filled 
the office of assessor for a nuniher 0/ years, 
and was a stanch Republican in politics. In 
18 — he left the farm and moved to Odell, 
v.here he lived retired until his death, in 
i8y8. He was a faithful memher of the 
Congregational church, to which his wife 
also belonged. She is still a resident of 
Odell. In their family were five children, 
namely : Ale.xander R., a teacher who lives 
in the Illinois State Reformatory: Mrs. 
Margaret Houchin: William E.. a real es- 
tate dealer of Odell; Charles H., our sub- 
ject: and I""rank L., a harness-maker of 
Odell. 

Our subject commenced his education in 
the district schools of Union township, and 
later attended the Odell high school. On 
leaving the home farm at the age of twenty- 
two years, he went to Odell, where he suc- 
cessfully conducted a livery, sale, feed and 
e.xchange stable, building up a large and 
I)rofital)le business and shipping in car- 
load lots to Xew York, Chicago and other 



markets. He was a fine judge of horses 
and was thoroughly conversant with e\ery 
department of the business. 

While engaged in business at OtlcU Mr. 
Hoke became interested in Republican pcjli- 
tics, and was elected constable, which posi- 
tion he acceptably filled for twelve years. 
He was a delegate to most of the county and 
state conventions of his part\-, and served 
as deputy sheriff for Odell under Sheriff 
Wilson for two years; four years under T. 
W. Coe, and four years under E. O. Reed, 
the present county treasurer. He was also 
prominently mentioned as candidate for 
sheriff in 1897, and received the second 
highest number of votes, W. L. Talliott 
being the successful candidate of the seven 
in the field. Mr. Hoke made a thorough 
canvass and after the election was at once 
a])pointed chief deputy by Sheriff Talbott. 
Since then he has been a resident of 
Pontiac, and now owns a beautiful home 
at No. 610 East Madison street. In his 
present position he has had charge of a 
number of noted criminals, including Sam- 
uel Rightsel, convicted of murder at Fair- 
bury; and the six bank robbers who looted 
the Cornell Piank. He has prosed a most 
efficient and satisfactor\- otiicer. being 
prompt and faithful in the discharge of his 
duties and true to e\er_\' trust reposed in 
him. whether public or ])rivate. 

On the _'2d of .\\n-\\. 1893. Mr. Hoke 
was united in marriage with Miss Minnie 
G. Worthley. of Harvey, Illinois, a daugh- 
ter of Daniel Worthley, a veteran of the 
Civil war and an early settler of this state 
from Ohio, who is now living retired in 
Pontiac. By this union lias been born one 
child, Georgetta D. The}- attend and sup- 
])ort the Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. 
Hoke is a member. I'raternalK- Mr. Hoke 



294 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is an honored member of the Odd Fellows 
Lodge, No. 464, of Odell, of which he is 
past grand ; also a member of the encamp- 
ment : the Court of Honor at Pontiac. and 
one of the charter members of the Toilers" 
Fraternit\'. 



ALBERT GRAXT TUTTLE. 

Albert Grant Tvittle, one of the most en- 
terprising agriculturists of Livingston coun- 
t}', now owns and operates the northwest 
Cjuarter of section i, Saunemin township, 
\\ hich he has converted into one of the best 
improved farms of that locality. He was 
born in \'erona township, Oneida county, 
New York, June 28, 1845, ^^^'^ is the only 
child of Solomon and Emeline (Page) Tut- 
tle. The father was born near Camden, 
New Yoi;k, August 15, 18 15, and is a son 
of Zopher Tuttle, a soldier of the war of 
181 2, who was born in England and on first 
coming to this country located in Connecti- 
cut, where he married, but later moved to 
Oneida county. New York. He followed 
farming and reared a large family of chil- 
dren, one of whom, Zopher Tuttle. became 
a prominent pioneer of Illinois and a large 
land owner, who recently dietl in Wichita, 
Kansas. 

The father of our subject grew to man- 
hood in Oneida county, New York, and in 
early life was a successful boat builder on 
the Erie canal. He invested his capital 
largely in real estate and the dairy business 
and made quite a fortune. He was one of 
the early land owners in La Salle cnunt}', 
Illinois, and for years was a director and 
large stockholder of the First National 
Bank, of Rome, New York. He was une 
of the most influential men in his commu- 



nity in raising money and soldiers fnr the 
Civil war, and has always been a stanch sup- 
porter of the Republican party. He served 
as supervisor of liis township for some years, 
and is one of its most highly esteemed citi- 
zens. Religiously he is an active member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, to which 
the mother of our subject also belonged, 
has e\er taken an active part in its work, 
and is one of its most liberal supporters. 
The mother died when our subject was only 
a few days old. She was a native of Oneida 
county. New York, and a daughter of Na- 
thaniel Pase, who at one time was a prom- 
ment boat builder and real estate owner of 
that county.. He was born in England, and 
before his removal to Oneida county lived 
in Herkimer, New York, for a time. When 
our subject was two years old his father 
married Sarah Bailey, by whom he had 
three sons. 

During his boyhood Grant Tuttle at- 
tended the common schools of New London, 
New York, and remained at home until he 
attained his majority, when he started out 
to make' his own way in the world, working 
as a dri\er on canal boats for si.x months. 
The following year he steered, and then ran 
a boat for one man two seasons, at the end 
of which time he bought a boat and success- 
fully engaged in the same business fur him- 
self, making seven trips each season between 
Buffalo and New York. He became well 
acquainted with the boatmen along the canal, 
and, when business began to drop off and 
he sold his boat, he was offered a position 
with a commission house in Buffalo, at good 
wages, the firm trying hard to get him. In 
September, 1882, Mr. Tuttle came tn Li\- 
ingston county, Illinois, and purchased his 
present farm in Saunemin township, which 
at that time was entirelv unimproved. Af- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



295 



tor building a small house he was joined by 
his family, December 12, i88j. He has 
thoroughly tiled his land, which was at first 
swampy, has buiU fences, a good set of farm 
buildings, and a beautiful country hduie in 
iS()3 — one of the finest in the townshi]). He 
has been (|uite extensively engaged in horse 
r.iis'ng. hut now devotes most of lii,s atten- 
tion to general farming, in which he has 
met with well-merited success. 

Mr. Tuttle was married. Octolier i. 1S7J. 
ti' Miss Henrietta Belcher, a native of \'c- 
rniia. .\'cw York, and a daughter ni Alex- 
ander I'iclcher. ;i well-km iwn farmer and 
mill iiwncr of that place. ( )i' the se\en 
children born to them two are deceased. 
Tlio.se li\ing are .Marcia. Wells. .Morris, 
Julia and iCllis, all at home, .\lthough f;rm- 
erly Methodists. Mr. and ^lr^. Tuttle now 
attend and support the Ennngton Congre- 
gational church. He is a stanch supporter 
of the Republican jiarty. but has never been 
an aspirant for ofiice. preferring to devote 
his undivided attention to his business in- 
terests. He is. however. public-s])iritcd an 1 
progressive, and gives his inthience toward 
advancing ;uiy enterprise which he believes 
Vvill pro\e of i)ublic lienefit. 



GEORGE J. \\ALTER. 

George J. Walter, who has success- 
fully engaged in the manufacture of 
brick and tile for the past twenty \ears, is 
numbered among the leading and most suc- 
cessful of the business men of Chatsworth, 
of which city he has been a resident since 
September, 1S66. He was born in Xew 
"^'ork city, December 5, 1852, and is tlie son 
of John and Elizabeth (Reille) Walter, the 



former a native of Baden, Germany, and the 
latter of Wurtemburg, Germany, but who 
came to this country in early man and wom- 
anhood and were married in New York city, 
wliere they lived for some years. 

In his youth John Walter learned the 
shoemaker's trade which he followed for 
twentv-five years, after which he engaged 
in the mercantile trade, in which lie con- 
tinued until about uSc/). since which time he 
has lived a retired life. After leaving Xew' 
\'ork he remained for a time in Indiana, 
and then came with his family to Chats- 
worth, in 1866, and here has since con- 
tinued to reside. Eor many years he was 
one of the leading business men of the city, 
and carried a general stock of goods. For a 
number of years he' served on the school 
board of that city, and was also for sev- 
eral years a member of the village board of 
trustees. John and Elizabeth Walter were 
the parents of six children, two of whom died 
in infancy, while Elizabeth died at the age of 
twenty-one years. GeorgeJ. is the subject of 
this .sketch. Louis .\ . is in the lumber busi- 
ness in Chatsworth. while .\lbert F. is in 
the dry goods business in the same cit\'. 

George J. Walter was fourteen \ears old 
when he came to Chatsworth. His educa- 
tion, begun in the public schools of his native 
city, was continued in the public schools 
of Indiana, where, as stated, the family re- 
sidetl for a time. On coming to Chatsworth 
he entered the public schools of the place and 
for about three years attended the high 
school. The education received in the 
schools was a practical one. and on lea\;ng 
school he entered the store of his father, 
and later, in com]ian\- with his brother 
1.1 nis. took cha.rge of the business foi- .about 
tw o years. 

In September. 1877. .Mr. Walter was 



296 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



united in marriage with Miss Lena Heil- 
mann, who was born in Baden, Germany, in 
1857, and who came to this country with her 
parents when but two years of age. By this 
union tliere have been born si.x children, 
one of whom died in infancy. Edna E. is at- 
tending Northwestern College, Naperville. 
Illinois, where she is taking a commercial 
course, and als(j the music and art course. 
Lydia is at home attending the high school 
of Chatsworth. Clara, Arthur and Esther 
are all at home. 

After his marriage. Mr. Walter eml)arked 
in the bakery business in which he remained 
about two years with a fair degree of suc- 
cess. He was then one year in the furniture 
business, and in 1880 sold out and broke 
ground for his present plant for the manu- 
facture of brick and tile, and at once engaged 
in the business. He has four kilns for burn- 
ing brick and tile, and has erected large 
buildings and sheds for drying, with a floor 
space of nine thousand scjuare feet. In 1881 
he put in an engine of eighty-five horse 
power, and also two boilers of one hundred 
and ten horse power. The plant has a ca- 
pacity for thirty thousand brick and Mr, 
Walter does the largest business of any firm 
in the county, shipping his product by rail 
to nianv points in and out of the county. 

In politics Mr. Walter is a Republican, 
and has taken an active interest in the politi- 
cal affairs of his country, though never an 
active politician. He has been a member of 
the school board in Chatsworth for seven 
years, and has taken great interest in main- 
taining good schools. Religiously he and 
his wife are members of the Evangelical 
Association. 

In his business life Mr. Walter has been 
verv successful. For a short time he had 
a i)artner. and fi ir aliout five years his fa- 



ther was associated with him in business, 
but for the greater part of the time he has 
managed it alone, and as stated does the larg- 
est business of any firm in the county in 
like business, and he has the largest plant in 
the county. In addition to the plant which 
covers two and a half acres of ground, he 
owns eighty acres adjoining the city on the 
east. As a citizen no one is willing to do 
more to advance the interests of his adopted 
city and county, and as friend he is kind 
and obliging, ever willing to do a good turn. 
.\s such as he is entitled to a place in the 
historical annals of his countv. 



WALTER LEGGATE. 

Walter Leggate, one of the leading agri- 
culturists of Germanville township, whose 
fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres is 
pleasantly situated on section 14, was born 
in the city of New York, December 7, 1853, a 
son of John and Elizabeth (Fleming) Leg- 
gate. The father was bom on the 25th of 
August. 1816. in Lanarkshire, Scotland, 
through which county flows the far-famed 
and beautiful ri\er Clyde, and is a sun oi 
James and Margaret (Dalgleish) Leg- 
gate, who had three children : Robert, who 
served for twenty years in the British army, 
and died at his home in Scotland in 1885; 
John, father of our subject ; and James, who 
came to America when a young man and is 
now living in New Jersey. In early life 
John Leggate learned the weaver's trade, 
and in 1837 married Elizabeth Fleming, also 
a native of Lanarkshire. In 1848, witli their 
family of four children, the}' took ])assage 
on a sailing vessel at Glasgow, and after ten 
weeks si)ent upon the water landed in .\e\v 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



297 



^t)^k city, where the father worked at liis 
trade three years, and in a glass factory the 
^ame lengtli of time. Later he moved to 
Canada, and made his home near London, 
until 1857. being employed in a brickyard 
most of the time. Having saved a little 
money by close economy and untiring in- 
dustry, he resolved to invest it in western 
land and came to Livingston county. Illi- 
nois, where he jnirchased eighty acres in 
( iermanville township. He prospered in his 
new home, and at length became the owner 
lit two hundred -.uul forty acres of valuable 
hind on section 10. where he is now living 
a retired life enjoying the fruits of former 
toil. He is a man of many noble traits of 
character, and is highly respected and es- 
teemed by all who know him. Religiously 
lie is a faithful member of the Presbyterian 
church, and has always taken an acti\e part 
in church and Sunday school work. In 
h.is political views he is a Republican, and 
filled the ofiice of justice of the ]ieace in his 
tiiwnship for nian_\- yern"s. His wife died in 
May. 1893. at about the age of seventy- 
eight years, and was laid to rest in German- 
ville cemetery. She, too. was a devout member 
of the Presbyterian church and a most es- 
tinicible lad v. 

To this worthy coujjle were Ijorn nine 
children, of whom four are now living; 
James, a brick manufacturer of Chicago, 
who first married Matilda Linn, and second 
.\nna Smith, of Chicago; John, an engineer 
of Chicago, who married Xancy McKav; 
Walter, our subject; and Sarah, wife of 
Owen McMahon. who operates his father- 
in-law's farm in Germanville township. 
Of those deceased Marion died when a small 
child in Scotland ; Margaret married John 
Beckman of Germanville township, and died 
ii", Iowa, where her husband is now engaged 



in farming; Robert served three years in 
Company E. Eighty-ninth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and died in Iowa, leaving a wife 
and two children; (jecirge. born in Scotland, 
married Dora Lutson, of Germanville town- 
slii]). where he followed farming for some 
tune, but about fourteen years ago moved 
t'l Iowa, where he died in March, 1898, leav- 
ing a widow and four children; and Archie 
died in Germanville, at the age of four 
years. 

Walter Leggate was only a year old 
w hen the family mo\ed to Canada, and came 
with them to Illinois, in the spring of 1857. 
At the age of nine \ears he entered the pub- 
lic schools of Germanville township, where 
he was educated. He continued to assist in 
the operation of the home farm until four- 
teen yearge ago, when he located upon his 
present place, and has since devoted his en- 
ergies to its further improvement and culti- 
vation. Politically he is identified with the 
Republican party, and he has been called 
u])iin III scr\c his fellow citizens as town- 
ship collector several terms and also as con- 
stable. He is widely and favorably known 
in his ado|)ted county, and those who know 
him best are numbered among his warmest 
friends. 

On the 25th of December. 1876, in Ger- 
manville township, Mr. Leggate was united 
in marriage with Miss Ruth Ellen Mahood, 
a daughter of .Me.xander and Mary (Sum- 
ney) Mahood. The father, who was a 
prominent and prosperous farmer of that 
township, died in 1874. and was buried there, 
but the mother is still living at the age of 
seventy-one years, and makes her home with 
our subject. Mr. Leggate has been called 
upon to mourn the loss of his estimable wife, 
who died June i, 1897. leaving four chil- 
dren, namely: John Alexander, born March 



298 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



30, 1878; Laura, August 26, 1880; Walter 
F., July 12, 1884; and Eva May, January 
26, 1889. All were born in Livingston 
countv. and the family is one of prominence 
in the community where they reside. 



HON. CHARLES M. BARICKMAN. 

Hon. Charles M. Barickman, judge of 
the county and probate courts of Livingston 
county, is a native of the county, and was 
born in Newtown township, December 28, 
1862. His father, Benjamin Barickman, is 
one of the oldest living settlers of the county, 
having located here in 1832, when a lad of 
eight years. (See sketch on another page 
of this work.) 

On the home farm Charles M. grew to 
manhood, and in the common schools of 
the neighborhood he received his primary 
education, while during his vacations he as- 
sisted in the operation of the farm. \\'ith 
the desire to obtain a more liberal education 
than that afforded by the public schools, he 
entered the Illinois Wesleyan University, 
Bloomington, Illinois, from which institu- 
tion he was graduated with the class ol 
1887. 

Lea\-ing the university for the next two 
years, Mr. Barickman was engaged in teach- 
ing, first at Ancona and later at Cornell, 
spending one year in each place. During 
that time, in his leisure linurs and during his 
vacations, he read law and made such prog- 
ress in his studies that in 1889 he was ad- 
mitted to practice in all the courts of the 
state bv the supreme court in session at Ml. 
Vernon, Illinois. 

On his admission to the bar, Mr. Barick- 
man located in Pontiac and at once entered 



upon the practice of his profession. He 
very soon took rank with the leading prac- 
titioners of the place, and became well 
known throughout the county. His ability 
as an attorney was recognized, and in 1894 
he was nominated for the office of county 
judge, and at the election in November of 
that year he was elected by a majority of 
about eight hundred over his Democratic 
opponent. So well did he transact the 
business of the olifice that in 1898 he was re- 
nominated and elected by a largely increased 
majority, receiving the largest number of 
votes of any candidate upon the ticket, his 
majority being twelve hundred and twenty- 
six votes. He is now serving his second 
term, and to say that his management of the 
ofifice is satisfactory to the people goes with- 
out question. 

On the 1 6th of April, 1890, Judge Ba- 
rickman was united in marriage with Miss 
Rena M. Ten Eick and daughter of ^Matthew 
and Mary (Means) Ten Eick, of Blooming- 
tun. Illinois. The judge and his wife attend 
and support the Methodist Episcopal church, 
cf Pontiac, and socially they are held in the 
highest esteem. They occupy a fine resi- 
dence on Maplewood avenue, erected by the 
Judge, and their home is ever open to their 
many friends. 

Judge Barickman was born during the 
time of the civil war, and grew up a loyal 
citizen and an ardent Republican. His 
first presidential vote was cast for James 
G. Blaine in 1884, and since that time he 
has ever taken an active interest in politics, 
and his influence has been felt in the councils 
of his partv and in the county of which he 
has been a life-long resident. Eratcrnally 
he is a member of Pontiac Lodge, No. 294, 
A. F. & A. M. ; and of Crescent Lodge, No. 
118, K. P. In the latter lodge he has held 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



299 



all the chairs, and has been a representative 
to the Grand Lodge of the state. He is 
also a member of the Uniformed Rank, K. 
P., and has served as captain two terms. 
As a citizen he is alive to all that has a tenil- 
ency to make the city of his adoption and 
the connty of his birth take rank with the 
best in our fair state. 



LEONARD LARGE. 

Leonard Large, deceased, was for many 
years identified with the agricultural inter- 
ests of Pleasant Ridge township, Livingston 
county, Illinois, and was numbered among 
its highly respected citizens. He was born 
May 3, 1818, in Farrington, five miles from 
Lynn, England, and there grew to manhood 
on a farm, his father being employed as a 
farmer on an estate there. In 1853 he mar- 
ried Miss Sarah F. Mitchell, who was born 
near the same place. May 4, i8_'(j. Her 
father was Freeman Mitchell, a native of 
W ispich, England, and a blacksmith by 
trade, who died when she was eight years 
old, leaving a widow and four children. 

For one year after their marriage Mr. 
and Airs. Large made their home in Rose- 
berry, Topham, Yorkshire, England, and 
then came to the United States, settling first 
in Stony Rocks, New York, not far from 
Auburn, where they spent four years. At 
the end of that time they came to Illinois 
and bought a small tract of ten acres of land 
five miles from Eureka, on which a log house 
was built. As his financial resources in- 
creased Mr. Large added to his property 
little by little until he had forty acres, which 
he subsetiuently sold for eleven hundred 
<l(illars. In 1870 he came to Pleasant Ridge 



township, Livingston county, and purchased 
eighty acres of land on which the family 
still reside. At that time not a fence had 
been built or an improvement made, but he 
erected a good house and barn, planted fruit 
and shade trees, tiled the land and placed it 
under a high state of cultivation, so that it 
ii now a valuable farm. 

Mr. Large died September 11, 1880, 
houiired and respected by all who knew him. 
J>oth be and his estimable wife held mem- 
bership in the Episcopal church. In their 
family were the following children : \Vill- 
iam; Sarah A., deceased; Leonard, Isaac, 
Thomas, Mrs. Rebecca Minear, Mrs. Martha 
Bruner and John, all living near Lexington, 
Nebraska; Rachel and Robert, both at home. 



MILES DESIRE. 

Miles Desire, a farmer and stock raisir, 
residing on section 28, Chatsworth townshi]), 
while not numbered among the earlv settlers 
is a well known citizen of the county, which 
has been his home since 1876. He is a na- 
tive of iM-ance, born March r, 1853, and is 
a son of Casimer W. and Mary (Savorvin) 
Meillian, both of whom were also natives of 
b'rance, where their entire lives were spent, 
and where they died about 1896. They were 
the parents of eight children, of whom one 
(lied in infancy. The living are Desire, the 
subject of this sketch: Marrius, Dennis, 
Ferdinand, Julius, Mary and Susan. Of the 
children none came to this country but our 
subject and Dennis. The latter is living in 
Colorado, where he is engaged in mining. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood and was educated in the public schools 
of his native land. He was reared to farm 



300 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



life and assisted his father on tlie home farm 
until \SyT,. when he came to the United 
States, with a \iew of bettering his condition 
m life. On his arrir\al he took up his resi- 
lience in Marshall county, Illinois, where 
worked as a farm hand for three years. He 
then came to Livingston county, rented land 
in Germanville township, and commenced 
farming for himself. Two years later, Sep- 
tember 21, 1878. he was united in marriage 
with Miss Martha Be\-ins, who was born in 
Bureau county, Illinois, in i860. After his 
marriage he continued to farm rented land 
in Germanville township until 1881, when he 
moved to Chatsworth township, where he 
also rented and continued to farm until 1889, 
when he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 30, a partly improved farm. 
To that farm he mo\-ed and put it under an 
excellent state of cultivation.tiling and other- 
wise improving the place. He remained on 
that farm for six years and then purchased 
three hundred and sixt}- acres of swamp 
and timber land on section 28. This land 
was entirly unimproved, havinj^- neither 
building or fence on the place. He has since 
cleared about two hundred acres of timber, 
drained the swamp, and now has a good 
farm. The first year he raised ninety bushels 
of sod corn to tlie acre. 

Mr. and Mrs. Desire are the parents of 
three children : ]\Iary Ann. who is engaged 
in dressmaking" in Chatsworth ; and Lizzie 
and Joseph, at home. Mrs. Desire was one 
of a family of four daugliters and one son. 
as follows : Annie, wife of Carl Drake, liv- 
ing in Chicago; Martha E., wife of our sub- 
ject; Sarah E., wife of George Pyles, now 
living in Missouri; Mary A., wife of M. 
Krebb, of Chicago; and Caleb E., living in 
Whiting, Indiana. 

When Mr. Desire came to the United 



States he could not speak a word of the Eng- 
lish language, anil he was se\enteen dollars 
in debt when he landed in Chicago. He 
came here, howe\-er. with the intention of 
overcoming all obstacles, and that he has 
overcome them this record of his life will 
attest. By his industry and enterprise he has 
become the owner of a fine farm, well 
stocked, and the future is bright before 
him. In addition to general farming he has 
usually engaged in the stock business, not 
onlv raising but buying and shipping as 
well, and in this he has met with a reasonable 
degree of success. 

Mr. Desire cast his first presidential vote 
for Samuel J. Tilden, but now votes the 
Republican ticket straight. He has served 
as commissioner of highways for ten years, 
urer of the commissioner of highways for 
school director nine years, and has been tras- 
the last three years. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias of Chats- 
worth, and has lieen trustee of the same. 
He is also a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America of Chatsworth. Religiously 
he is a member of the Catholic church of 
Chatsworth. He has been a successful man, 
is well esteemed in the community which 
lias been his home for nearly a (|uarter of a 
century and has many warm friends. 



DA\TD SHANTZ. 

David Shantz, who owns and operates 
a valuable farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres on section 2/. Sullivan township, Liv- 
ingston county. Illinois, is a native of Can- 
ada, born in Berlin, Waterloo county, Jan- 
uarv 30, 1846, and is a son of Isaac C. and 
Elizabeth (Snyder) Shantz, both natives of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



301 



reniisylvania. Tlie Sliaiitz family came 
<>rigiiiall\' from Switzerland, and were 
among the tir.-it settlers of Bucks county. 
Pennsylvania. Tlie great-grandfather of 
our subject was Isaac Shantz, who was ■horn 
in .Montgomery county, that state, January 
14, 174S, anil was married, in 1774. to Piar- 
hara Reiti'. who was born in September, 
1753. When our subject's father was only 
three years old, the grandfather. Christian 
Shantz, took his family to Waterlot) county. 
Canada, locating there when the Indians 
were far more nuiuerous than the wliite set- 
tlers. There he and his wife spent their re- 
maining days. The father grew to manhood 
in Canada and in early life learned the cab- 
ir.ctmaker's trade. I'^or many years he ran 
a sawmill and furniture factory at Man- 
heim. manufacturing all kinds of furniture, 
l)ut misfortune overtook him and he sold 
out. In 1858 he removed to (iardner, Grun- 
dy county. Illinois, where he engaged in 
farming upon rented land for two years, 
ar.d for the same length of time rented land 
in Round Grove and Dwight townships. Liv- 
ingston county. Coming to Sulli\an town- 
ship in 1864 he purchased one hundred and 
si.xty acres of land, for which he paid twenty 
dollars per acre, it being the farm on which 
our subject now lives. At the time of his 
death he owned two hundred acres, a part of 
which was wild prairie when he purchased 
it. His first home here was a small struc- 
ture. 14x16 feet, the lumber for which he 
hauled from Pontiac, a distance of twenty 
miles. While a resident of Dwight town- 
ship he sold one horse for war purposes for 
two hundred dollars. On first coming to 
this county our subject herded cattle on the 
prairies, bringing them from Ottawa each 
s])ring and taking them back in the fall. For 
this he received one dollar and a half per head 



for the season, and has cared for as many 
as .seven hundred at one time. The father 
died September jo, 1885, at the age of 
eighty-two years, and was laid to rest in 
Sullivan Center cemetery, while the mother 
died in December, 1892, at the age of eighty- 
five years. Tn their familv were the follow- 
ing children: Daniel, who died in Round 
Grove township, at the age of twenty-eight 
years, leaving two sons, who are still living; 
Lena, wi(Unv of Jacob .\macher and a resi- 
dent of Cullom. Illinois; Christian S., who is 
now living retired in the same place; Eliza- 
beth, wiio died at the age of two years; 
David, our subject: and Isaac, a farmer of 
Sulli\an t<»\\nship. 

During his boyhood and youth David 
Shantz attended school for two or three 
months during the winter seasons, and re- 
mained at home until he was married, Feb- 
ruary 25, 1893, to Miss Elizabeth Wenger. 
who was born in the Shenandoah valley, Ef- 
fingham count}', \'irginia. Her parents, 
Daniel and Sarah (Coffman) Wenger, were 
natives of the same state, and her grandfa- 
ther. Benjamin Wenger, was also a Virgin- 
ian by birth and a planter, who in the midst 
of the timber cleared and improved a farm. 
The father, who also followed' the occupa- 
tion of farming, died in 1889, the mother 
in 1896. They had twelve children, namely: 
Gideon, Benjamin, Samuel. Daniel, Annie, 
David, Elizabeth, Sarah, Solomon, Mary, 
Moses and John. With one exception all 
reached years of maturity. One is now liv- 
ing in Kansas, amjther in Michigan. Mrs. 
Shantz in Illinois, and the others in Vir- 
ginia, lohn and two sisters live on the old 
homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Shantz have five 
children: John and Sarah, who arc now 
attending .school: Alvin and Earl, twins; 
and Mary. 



302 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In 1885 Mr Shantz purchased the inter- 
est of the other heirs in his father's farm, 
and in 18Q9 liought an adjoining tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres, so that he now has 
a fine farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres, which is under a high state of cuhi- 
vation and well improveil. He makes a 
specialty of raising thoroughhred hrown 
Swiss cattle, and also keeps a thoroughbred 
shire stallion, "Barnie," for breeding pur- 
poses. Since casting his first presidential 
vote for U. S. Grant Mr. Shantz has always 
supported the Republican party, hut would 
never accept office, preferring to devote his 
undivided attention to his business interests. 
He and his wife are members of the ^len- 
nonite church, and are hip-hly respected and 
esteemed bv all who know them. 



\VILLIA!\I :\I. MILLER. 

U'illiam M. Miller, the well-known en- 
gineer of the city water works of Dwight, 
was born in Aurora, Illinois, October 25, 
1855, and is a son of John S. and Celia J. 
(Kennedy) Miller, natives of Fulton county. 
New York, where they were reared and mar- 
ried. In 1854 they came west and located m 
Aurora, Illinois, where the father followed 
his trade oi stone mason until 1S66, when he 
removed to Dwight. Here he engaged in 
■contracting and did a great deal of the stone 
work in Dwight and vicinity for many years, 
but is now living a retired life, in his eighty- 
eighth year. His wife died January 14, 
1899, aged eightv years. Our subject's 
paternal grandfather Miller came of a titled 
Holland family. He was i)res,sed intu the 
British army during the Revolutionary war 
and brought in .\merica. 



The subject of this sketch is the eighth 
in order of birth in a family of eleven chil- 
dren, ten sons and one daughter, of whom 
the eldest, a son, died in infancy : James A. 
enlisted, at Aurora, in the Forty-third Illi- 
nois \'olunteer Infantry during the ci\il war, 
and after two years re-enlisted as captain 
in the One Hundred and Si.xty-si.xth regi- 
ment, was captured at Fort Donelson and 
(lied in .\ndersonville prison: Charles is a 
contractor and builder of Chicago; .\ndrew 
has been an engineer on the W'abast Rail- 
road for thirteen years, and is now a resident 
of Decatur, Illinois; Amos is a prominent 
farmer of Ford county. Illinois : Robert was 
for several years yard master for the Wis- 
consin Central Railroad at tiie Roby street 
yards, Chicago, in which city he died in Sep- 
temlier, 1S95; Alfred was for eleven years 
a conductor on the Indiana, Illinois & Iowa 
Railroad, and was killed near \\'alkerton, 
Indiana. April ^o, 1899, leaving a widow 
and three children, who reside in Chicago ; 
Jennie is the wife of Zerum Johnson, a resi- 
dent of Dwight ; Joseph and Dewitt both 
died of diphtheria, aged, respectively, seven 
and four years. 

^^'illiam B. Miller was but a lad of eleven 
}'ears when the family removed to Dwight, 
which has been his home ever since. He 
assisted his father in stone work until si.x- 
teen years of age, when he entered the em- 
plo)" of the Chicaeo iS: .\Iton Railroatl as 
section hand, and in less than a year was 
made foreman. Two years were sjient in 
the round hou.se at Dwight, and he was then 
promoted to engineer, running a local 
freight from Dwight to Washington, Illi- 
nois, for three years and a half. During 
the big strike of 1892 he left the railroad 
and for one year was ene\age(l in running 
a stationary engine. In i8t\^ lie accejned his 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



303 



])resent position as engfineer of tlie city water 
works at Dwight. and has since given his 
entire attention to that work. The construc- 
tiiMi of tile plant was commenced in 189J 
and finished the following year, and at that 
time was run by steam, but in 1897 tlie 
Leslie E. Keeley Company donated to the 
city a modern Fairbank & Morse gas engine 
of twenty-five horse power, two Gould seven- 
inch pumps with a lift capacity of seven 
thousand gallons per hour, and a stand pipe 
one hundred and twenty feet high, the upper 
l)art of which is a still tank, fifty-two feet, 
with a capacity of fifty thousand gallons. 
This furnishes an ample fire protection as 
well as supply for general use. 

On the 18th of February. 1881. Mr. 
Miller was united in marriage with Miss 
Jennie Heffner. daughter of .Xndrew and 
Jane ( Vocum) Heffner. Her lather was a 
])rominent citizen and miller of Huntingxlon 
county. Pennsylvania, and was nct.d for his 
l)ene\olent and charitable disposition. iMrs. 
iMiller was born in that county October 27, 
i860, and there our subject met her, while 
on a visit to Pennsylvania. She is the fourth 
in. order of birth in a family of si.x children, 
the others being Mary, wife of Stewart 
Africa, of Huntingdon county. Pennsyl- 
vania ; Rachel, who is at home with her 
mother ; John, who succeeded his father in 
business; Rebecca, at home; and Thomas, 
who is living on the old homestead. To 
Mr. and iMrs. Miller were born eight chil- 
dren, namely: Lawrence A., who died at 
the age of twelve years; Celia J., Francis 
J.. Ralphus A., Milton J., iMary R., Rachel 
and Rebecca. 

I-'raternally iMr. iMiller is a charter mem- 
l;er of the Independent Order (jf Mutual 
.Aid; of Hebron Lodge. Xo. 175. K. P., in 
which he has filled most of the offices, and a 



charter member of the Knights of Macca- 
bees of Dwight. and finance keeper of the 
same. He takes an active interest in the 
progress and growth of his town, and by 
his ballot supports the men and measures 
of the Republican party. 



JOHX LEGG.VTE. 

John Leggate. one nf the highly honoretl 
and respected citizens of Germanville towiv 
ship, Livingston county, owns and occupies 
a well-improved and highly cultivated farm 
of one hundred and si.xty acres on section 
10. and has most efficiently served as justice 
of the peace for many years. He was born 
in Lanarkshire, near (ilasgow. Scotland, Au- 
gust 25, 1816, and is a son of James and 
Margaret (Dalgleish) Leggate. who si>ent 
their entire lives in that country. The 
mother died when mir subject was only four 
years old, and the father afterward married 
Esther Cooper, also a nati.\e of Scotland. 
He followed the occupation of weaving 
throughout life and died at the age of forty- 
seven years. IW his first marriage he had 
three childrlcn, of whom our subject is the 
oldest. James, who is now living retired 
in Patteron, New Jersey, alsi^ followed 
weaving during his active life and has ac- 
cumulated considerable property. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Watson, of Scotland, and to 
them have been born six children. Robert, 
the other brother of our subject, served 
twenty years in the British army, and died 
at his home in Scotland at the age of fifty 
years, leaving a family of children, none of 
whom ever came to this country. By his sec- 
ond marriage the father had four children: 
Esther. George. William and William, all 
of whom died when (luite \iiung. 



304 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



John Leggate was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of his birthplace, and in early life 
learned the weaver's trade with his father, 
following that occupation continuously un- 
til coming to tlii United States at the age 
of thirty-two years. In his nati\-e land he 
was married, December 29, 1837, to Miss 
Elizabeth Fleming, a daughter of John and 
Marian (Stuart) Fleming, life-long resi- 
dents of Scotland. Her father was also a 
weaver. 

In 1848, with his wife and children, Mr. 
Leggate sailed for America, and spent the 
first six years of his residence here in New 
York City, where he followed his trade three 
years, and also worked in a stained glass 
factory the same length of time. Subse- 
quently he spent two years near London, 
Canada, where he was engaged in the manu- 
facture of brick, and in 1857 came to Liv- 
ingston county, Illinois. He had previously 
accjuired some capital, being economical and 
industrious, and this he invested in land on 
section 10, Germanville township, where he 
now resides. As his financial resources have 
increased he has added to his landed posses- 
sions, and now owns two hundred and forty 
acres of land, eighty acres of which are on 
section 14, the same township. When it 
came into his possession it was wild prairie 
land, but acre after acre were soon placed 
under the plow, a comfortable residence was 
erected, good barns and outbuildings were 
also built and many other improvements 
made, so that it is now one of the most de- 
sirable farm of that section of the county. 

Of the nine children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Leggate only four are now living, 
namelv : James, born in Scotland, is now 
a brick manufacturer of Chicago. He mar- 
ried Matilda Linn, by whom he had four 
children, two still living, Lillie and Mancel. 



His second wife was Anna Smith, of Chi- 
cago. (2) John, born in Scotland, is an 
engineer of Chicago. During the civil war 
he enlisted in Company D, Eighty-ninth Illi- 
iiois A*,)lunteer Infantry, but was wounded 
shortl}- after entering the service and hon- 
orably discharged. He married Nancy Mc- 
Kay and has three children, Rebecca, Liz- 
zie and ]\Iaggie. (3) \\'alter, a farmer 
of Germanville township, is represented on 
another page of this work. (4) Sarah is 
the wife of Owen McMahon, who operates 
iiur subject's farm. Of those deceased, 
Marion died in Scotland when cjuite young. 
Alargaret married John Beckman, of Ger- 
manville township, and died in Lnva, at the 
age of twenty-seven years. Robert, born in 
Scotland, was a member of the same com- 
]iany as his brother John, and ser\-ecl until 
the end of the war. He married Mary Sher- 
man and died at the age of thirty-eight years, 
lea\-ing two children. Viola and Etta. 
George, born in Scotland, married Dora Lut- 
son and lived in Germanville township for 
some time, but spent his last days in Iowa, 
where he died, leaving four children. Nancv 
James, Viola and Martha. Archie died in 
Germanville at the age of four years. 

Since becoming an American citizen Mr. 
Leggate has afiiliated with the Republican 
party, and has taken quite an active interest 
in public affairs. Since 1869 he has most 
creditably and acceptably filled the ofiice of 
justice of the peace, and at different times 
has held all of the township offices, being 
school treasurer twelve years. Lpright and 
honorable in all things, he has been found 
true to every trust reposed in him, whether 
jjublic or private, and is accounted tme of 
the most valued and useful citizens of his 
comnnuiitv. In religious faith he and his 
familv are Preshvterians. His estimable 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



30: 



wife died in May, 1893, at the age of sev- 
enty-eiglit years, and was laid to rest in the 
Ciermanville cemetery. He is now practi- 
cally living retired. surrc;)unded 1)y a large 
circle of friends and ac(|uaintances, who es- 
teem him higfhlv for liis sterline: worth. 



A1).\M S MAKER. 

Adam Shafer, who resides on section 27. 
Chatsworth township, has been a resident of 
Ei\'ingston county since 1863. He was born 
in Koor, Hessen, German}-, September 26, 
1S47. His father dying when he was but an 
infant and his mother marrying again, he 
Mas reared by an aunt until twelve years of 
age, when he went to live with his mother 
and .step- father, Jacob Gabriel. In 1857 
tiie family came to the United States and lo- 
cated in Tazewell county, Illinois, where 
they remained for five years, and in 1863 
moved to what was tiien the southern part 
of Chatsworth township, but is now Ger- 
manville township. On the farm of iiis step- 
father our subject grew to manhood, in the 
meantime receiving a limited education in 
the pul)iic schools. From the time he was 
old enough to follow a ])lmv he had to do 
his share of the farm work, and therefore 
he became a tlKjrough, practical farmer. 
\\'hen twenty-one years old he left home 
and for the next three vears worked as a 
farm hand, during which time lie saved up 
the greater jjart of liis earnings and was 
enabled to commence farming for himself. 

In December. 1870. Mr. Shafer was 
united in marriage with Miss Kathrina 
Xeiding, who was born in Germany in 1845. 
She came to this country when twenty-three 
years of age, after the deatli of her parents. 



She had one brother and three sisters in this 
country, but of the five her brother John 
and her sister Martha are the only ones now 
living. The latter is the wife of Henry 
Brents, of Brule, Nebraska. The former is 
engaged in farming in Chatsworth town- 
ship. To Mr. and Mrs. Shafer were born 
nine children, two of whom died in early 
childhood. Those living are Christ, a pros- 
perous young farmer ;n Chatsu'orth town- 
shi]), who is married and has three children. 
He is living on his father's farm in that 
township. Lizzie is the wife of Henry 
Klehm, and they ha\-e two children. They 
reside on a farm in Ford county. Katie is 
the wife of I'hilip Keosner, and thc\- live 
near Chenoa, McLean county. They ha\e 
one son. Edward, Charles, Bert'e and Lena 
yet remain at home with their fath:r, the 
sons assisting- in the farm work, while the 
daughter attends to the housekeeping. 

-After their marriage Mr. and ]\lrs. 
Shafer continued to reside on rentd land in 
Germainillc lownshi]) for five years, during 
which time he succeeded in accunnilating 
sufficient means to purchase eighty acres of 
partially improved land in Chatsworth town- 
ship, south of the city. To that farm they 
removed, and here he has continued to reside 
imtil the j^resent time. From time to time 
he added to his possessions nnt 1 he now 
owns two hundred acres on section i". one 
hundred and twenty acres on section 2}^ and 
one hundred and sixty aci-es on section 16. 
Chatswiirtli township, all of which is inider 
a high state of cultivation. When twenty- 
one years old he had to face the world, a 
young man without means and the owner 
of not an acre of God's green earth, but by 
industry and the help of his wife, and also 
that of Iiis children in later years, he is now 
possessed of a competency and can Jirne no 



L 



3o6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



fear of the future. During the greater part 
of tlie time in which he has been accumulat- 
ing his wife was in ill health, and for much 
of the time under the care of a physician. 
He never went into the field without fear in 
his heart for the good wife at the house. 
Notwithstanding her illnefs she was to him 
a true helpmeet and an inspiration, and no 
sacrifice but was cheerfully made to secure 
her happiness. By her cheerful disposition 
and loving counsel she assisted him in the 
toils of the day. The improvements on his 
farm, including the residence, and the barns, 
the fences, the tiling and the orchard, is 
the result of his own labors, and he has rea- 
son to be proud of what has been accom- 
plished. For a number of years he owned 
and operated a corn sheller and a thresher. 
which added materially to his income. 

On the 24th of April. 1899. ]\Irs. Shafer 
passed from her earthly cares to the haven of 
rest. In the old country she was a number 
of the Lutheran church, but after her ma 
riage she united with the Evangelical Asso- 
ciation, with which body she remained a 
faithful and consistent member until her 
death. She was a lo\'ing wife, a kind 
mother and a deserving Christian woman, 
beloved by all who knew her. With the 
hope of a restoration to health she was taken 
tu a hospital in Chicago, and there under- 
went a severe surgical operation, but it was 
without avail. Death claimed her, but she 
was read}' to go. During her lung illness 
she bore it all uncomplainingly, and when 
the dread summons came she was ready, hav- 
ing an abiding hope in her blessed Savior, 
and with the full assurance that in the home 
beyond she would meet her loved ones, for 
they are all followers of the meek and lowly 
one. In her life she was an earnest and 
willing supporter of the church, and when 



able a worker in the Sunday school. Her 
life was a life of good works, and it can well 
be said of her, "Blessed are the dead who 
die in the Lord, for they shall rest from their 
labors and their works do follow them." 

Like his wife, Mr. Shafer is a member of 
the Evangelical Association and a firm be- 
liever in the Christian religion. Politically 
he is a Repulilican, but he is not an office 
seeker. Time and again has he refused local 
office that would be forced on h'm liy well 
meaning friends. His taste, however, did 
not run in that direction. He preferred to 
attend to his duties as a husband and father 
and to his farm work. However, he served 
as a school director for several years, but 
only for the reason that he was interested 
in the public schools and the cause of educa- 
tion. He is a citizen deservedly held in high 
esteem. 



RE\'. GEORGE HERTLEIX. 

Rev. George Hertlein, who is now liv- 
ing a retired life in the village of Cullom, 
Livingston county, Illinois, was born in 
Bavaria, Germany, November 30, 1849, ^"^ 
is a son of Lawrence and IMar)' Hertlein, 
both of whom \\ere natives of the same 
country and there spent their entire lives. 
Thev were the parents of three children, one 
of whom, Christ, died in 1897, at the age 
of forty-five years. Elizabeth lives in Ba- 
varia, and George is the subject of this 
sketch. 

George Hertlein grew to manhood in 
his native country and was educated in the 
parochial schools, supplemented by a four- 
years' course in a theological seminary, pre- 
paring for the ministry. He was graduated 
from the seminarv and ordained to the min- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



307 



istry in liis native country. In 1877 lie 
came tu tlie I'nited States and located in 
liiwa Cilv. Iowa, where he ser\ed as assist- 
ant pastor of a ciiurch for six niontlis ami 
was then called to the church at Sharon 
Center. Iowa, and for two years served as 
its pastor, tilling the duties of the sacred 
office to the entire satisfaction of his pa- 
rishioners, while enjoying the confidence of 
the coniniunity at large. He was then taken 
sick with inflammation of the lungs and was 
compelled for a time to abandon the minis- 
try. While yet resitling in his native land 
he .served three years and a half in the Ger- 
man arm\-, and his disability dates back to 
that time. A half-brother. Rev. Lorenz 
Schorr, preceded him to the United States, 
coming in 1861. He died in 1871. and our 
subject took up the work where his brother 
left oft". 

In 187S. aliout one year after his ar- 
rival in this country. Mr. Hertlein was 
unitetl in marriage with ^liss Mary Laub- 
pender, a native of Ohio, born in 1856, but 
who was then living in Sharon Center, Iowa, 
where the wedding ceremony was solemn- 
ized. By this union ten children have been 
born, two of whom died in infancy. Of 
those living, Sophia is now the wife of Pro- 
fessor L. Sheldahl, professor of history ami 
languages in the Iowa Synod College, at 
W'averly, Iowa. They have one child, 
Guido. Emma, at the age of eighteen, 
graduated from Iowa College, having taken 
the classical course. Matilda. Mary, Ame- 
lia, Ruth and George are attending school 
in Cullom. Hans is the youngest of the 
chililren. 

When comi)elled to relim|uish his charge 
at Sharon, Iowa, Mr. Hertlein embarked in 
the mercantile business at that place, in 
which he remained some vcars. He was 



also commissioned as postmaster and served 
as such until 1883. Regaining his health, 
he notified the Evangelical Lutheran Synod 
of Iowa, with which he was connected, that 
he was again prepared to take up his life 
w ork, and receiving a call from the church 
at Cullom, he moved to the place and for 
six months engaged in his chosen calling. 
He soon found that it would be impossible 
to continue in that wt)rk, and. resigning, 
again entered into the mercantile business, 
carrying a general stock. Purchasing a 
lot, he erected a building and commenced 
what proxed a successful mercantile career. 
In 189^) he sold out his stock, having in the 
meantime, bv good management and the 
exercise of good business ability and 
sound judgment, acquired enough of 
this world's goods to enaljle him to 
live in comfort. He has now one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land in Indiana 
and one hundred and sixty acres in Sulli- 
van township. Livingston county, together 
with some \illage property. In 1897 ha 
erected on his business block a good two- 
story brick building, well suited to the 
wants of the place, and which adds mate- 
rially to the business section of the town. 

When Mr. Hertlein came to Cullom it 
had only about one lnindre<l inhabitants, and 
to him much of the credit is due for the 
advancement it has made in jjopulation and 
wealth. He assisted in securing the tile 
factory for the place, and went into part- 
nership with E. .\. Ortman in the business, 
and they together operated it for seven years 
with good success. In 1898 he sold his in- 
tere.st to Mr. Ortman, since which time he 
has li\ed a (luiet, retired life, .giving his at- 
tention only to his farm and his village 
property. 

In ])olitics Mr. Hertlein was a Democrat 



308 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



until 1896, since wiiich time he has voted 
independently of party lines. For two 
terms he served as treasurer of the village, 
and was elected \'illage trustee, but after 
serving six months he resigned. He also 
ser\-ed as a member of the school board for 
se\'eral terms, and while no the l)oard he 
succeeded in hax'ing consolidated districts 
No. 6 and 7, and also secured the erection 
of a fine school building, which is an honor 
to the place. The first class to be grad- 
uated from the school was in June, 1900, 
and his daughter Mar}" was one of the grad- 
uates. 

I\lr. Hertlein was reared in the Evan- 
gelical Ltuheran church and has e\'er been 
an earnest ad\-ocate of its doctrines and its 
polity. Since 1883 he has served as an 
elder in the church, and until recently he 
was treasurer of the chuich in CoUum. 
When he came to the church as its pastor 
there was a debt of thirteen hundred dol- 
lars on the building and he made it his first 
duty to clear that, which he did in a short 
time by securing subscriptions from its 
members and friends. He later as- 
sisted in the erection of the parson- 
age, and since the death of its last 
minister he has had the financial man- 
agement I if it, and has placed it in good 
financial condition. He has always taken 
an active interest in the Sunday-school 
work, and is at present superintendent of 
the school and also serves as teacher. 
Acti\c in whatever he undertakes, he has 
met with uniform success in all things, and 
to such as he the general welfare of a com- 
munity depends. All esteem him as a true 
Christian, a successful Inisiness man and a 
giidil citizen, one hax'ing at heart the l)est 
\\-elfare nf the community in winch he 
li\'es. 



J. E. BANGS. 

Joseph Edward Bangs, a well known 
educator of this state, and the subject of' 
this sketch, was born in Bureau county, 
Illinois, and is the seventh in a family of 
eight children, five of whom are now living. 
His parents were Samuel L. Bangs and 
Margaret (Howard) Bangs. 

The father was a native of Massachu- 
setts, where his ancestors had resided since 
1624. They were originally from England. 
Our subject's paternal grandfather served in 
the Re\-olutionary war and Professor Bangs 
is therefore a veritable "Son of the Revolu- 
tion."' In the '50s Samuel L. Bangs came 
to Illinois and settled in Bureau county, 
liut later moved to La Salle county, which 
was his h(_>me for nearly forty years. He 
died in 1898 at the ripe age of ninety years, 
having seen Illinois transformed from a wil- 
derness to a garden. His wife, who is still 
living, was born in England. She bejongs 
to the well-known Howard family and is a 
direct descendant from the Duke of Nor- 
folk. She possesses an unusually bright in- 
tellect and now, at the age of eighty-one, 
is an interesting and lovable character. 

Mr. Bangs is essentially a self-made man. 
His boyhood was spent on the farm in La 
Salle county, where he early learned self 
sacrifice and endurance through the disci- 
pline of hard work. At seven years of age 
he was put to driving a team, at nine he 
drove a four-horse reaper, at fourteen he 
was making a "hand," regularly, binding be- 
hind a I\IcCornnck harvester. From earli- 
est boyhood he was a great reader and e\-er 
anxious to secure an education, but, for manv 
years, necessity compelled him to be content 
with the schooling which the three months 
Vv"inter school afforded. V>y studving at 



ir"-. 




PROF. J. E. BANGS. 




MRS. J. E. BANGS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



311 



night and by improving odd moments, how- 
ever, he was able to keep up with his more 
fortunate companions, who could attend 
school the year around. From the age of 
sixteen he earned his own spending money, 
paid for his clothes and books, and later 
made his own way through school. 

On leaving college, he immediatel}- began 
to teach, and after several years of successful 
experience, he took the rigid four days' ex- 
amination for a state license. This he suc- 
cessfully passed and received the state's seal 
upon his ability as an instructor in the form 
vi a state certificate, good for life. 

In the same year he took charge of the 
schoL>ls of Washburn, Illinois, where he es- 
tablished a course of study, doubled the en- 
rullmeni of the high school, drawing in pu- 
pils from outside tne district until one-half 
of the high school was composed of tuition 
pupils, who brought into the district enough 
money to pay a goud teacher's salary. He 
was especially successful in holding the boys 
i;i school and in sending his graduates to 
college. Here he graduated a class com- 
posed entirely of boys, nearly all of whom 
later entered college. His school became 
the inspiration of the schools of the county, 
w hile the results of the influences for higher 
education which he set at work among the 
people, can scarcely be estimated. 

After four years at Washburn. Mr. 
Bangs was called to a wider field of action 
at Fairbury, where he remained eight years, 
as superintendent and principal of the city 
schools, and a similar result is found. Dur- 
ing his administration, while the city in- 
creased but a few per cent, in population, the 
average daily attendance of the high school 
increased over one hundred and fifty per 
cent. A large increase was also found 
in the amount of tuition received. At the 



close of his work his patrons declared. "He 
left the schools on a practical and firm basis, 
second to none in the state." 

In 1894 Fairbury reluctantly yielded Mr. 
Bangs to Pontiac, where the buikling of a 
township high school had opened a larger 
field for the exercise of his executive ability. 
Here his practical methods, his capacity for 
details and his organizing talent brought the 
school very soon into a creditable and con- 
spicuous place among the educational insti- 
tutions of Illinois. Every year has shown 
a marked increase in the power and popu- 
larity of the school,in the amount of the tui- 
tion received from foreign students and in the 
enrollment of boys. In 1900 there were en- 
rolled one hundred and fourteen boys and 
one hundred and four girls, and a class com- 
posed of thirteen boys and six girls was grad- 
uated, while over twelve hundred and fifty 
dollars tuition was collected outside of the 
thirty-six miles of free territory. During 
the six years of ]Mr. Bangs' administration 
he has collected and paid into the lowiisliii) 
treasury' between fixe and six thousand 
dollars of tuition money. If tlie same 
average increase continues, it can be 
expected that the high school building 
will be paid for by outside tuition in a little 
over a score of years. Tlie best test of any 
school is found in what its product accom- 
plishes after leaving school, judged by thi> 
test, the township high school stands in the 
front rank. Its graduates are making a 
good record. In six years fifty graduates 
have become teachers and as man\' more 
uf its undergraduates. A large number 
have gone to college and an unusually large 
number are succeeding in business. 

By conscientious effort, the grade of the 
school has been steatlily raised until the in- 
stitution is now recognized bv our leading 



312 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



colleges and universities and has a place 
upon their lists of accredited schools. It is 
doubtful if any township high school in the 
state has made a better record in the first 
six years of its existence than the Pontiac 
high school under the direction of Mr. Bangs. 
He has ever been found faithfully discharg- 
ing his duties in the least pretentious posi- 
tions as in the most important ones and his 
efforts ha\'e in\'ariabl\' benefited the school 
permanently. It has been well said that 
"few men naturally possess the executive 
ability and talent for organization that we 
find in Mr. Bangs." This is amply proven 
by the fact that he has built up every school 
with which he has been connected. 

In addition to his w^ork as principal antl 
superintendent, during the past sixteen 
years, Mr. Bangs has spent from three to 
twelve weeks of his summer vacations, each 
year, as an institute instructor or conductor, 
so that his name is a familiar one in many 
counties of the state, and he has justly 
achieved the reputation of being a strong in- 
stitute worker. In one county he has been 
engaged twelve consecutive years. 

Few men count more friends among 
their fellow workers than does Mr. Bangs, 
for teachers recognize in him an earnest, 
sincere, loyal, helpful co-laborer — one who is 
working for the best in education e\'ery- 
where. This was markedly shown liv the 
resolution of endorsement for state superin- 
tendency given him by the Teachers' Asso- 
ciation of Livingston county, in 1898. This 
resolution w-as seconded by teachers of every 
political party and unanimously adopted with 
cordial enthusiasm. ]\Ir. Bangs is an ardent 
Republican, and ever has been, but he never 
lets party come befure principle ;ind where 
he is known he commands the respect of all 
parties. 



He was for several years president of the 
Livingston County Teachers' Association ; 
has served in an active manner on various 
committees in the state associations ; was 
vice-president of the Northern Illinois 
Teachers' Association in 1896, and is now — ■ 
1900 — one of the vice-presidents of the Illi- 
nois State Teachers' Association. 

In 1898 Mr. Bangs was urged by his 
friends to become a candidate for nomina- 
tion for state superintendent of public in- 
struction. Being engaged in teaching, he 
made no canvass, but the race he made was 
declared by old politicians to have been most 
creditable. Starting with but twenty-seven 
pledged votes, by the time the first ballot was 
taken he had three hundred and sixty-five 
recorded for him. A ijrominent jiaper in 
speaking of the convention, said: "Xo can- 
didate ever overcame odds more rapidly or 
made friends faster than did Mr. Bangs. 
His headquarters were always crowded. 
Had he started on equal terms with the suc- 
cessful candidate there is little doubt but that 
he would ha\'e been nominated." 

]\Ir. Bangs is deeplv interested in all the 
great moral, social and economic questions 
of the day and is ever ready to help in any 
good cause. He has been a teacher in Sab- 
bath school nearly all his mature life, was 
for some seven years superintendent of one, 
and is a regular attendant on di\'ine service. 
He is a stockholder and director in the Pon- 
tiac Summer Chautauqua and has interests 
in other public enterprises. 

The principal fraternal societies claim him 
as an active member. He belongs to the 
Woodmen, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
the various orders of Masonry and has 
passed through the "chairs" and licen jjre- 
siding officer in the mai<>rit\- (if them. He is 
past commander of St. Paul commandery, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



313 



Knights Templar, a member of the grand 
commandery of Illinois and of the Past 
commanders' Association of Chicago. He 
was active in working up the uniform rank, 
K. P., in the county and was successively 
elected first lieutenant, then captain of divis- 
ion No. 63, and later, in 1893, he was unani- 
mously elected lieutenant colonel of the 
Third Regiment, L'nifurm Rank. K. P., 
which is composed of companies located at 
J<.>liet, Seneca, Lemont. Ottawa, Kankakee, 
Mazon, Streator, Pont^ac, Peoria. Fairljury. 
In 1897 he was re-elected to this office and 
has been for nearly eight years a held officer 
of the Illinois brigade. In each of these po- 
sitions he has served h!s brethren well and 
faithfully, and they, in turn, have shown 
their appreciation on various occasions, bv 
testimonials of esteem and confidence. 

Mr. Bangs is a member of the Marquetl; 
Club and also of the Hamilton Club, both 
of Chicago, and takes an active part in ad- 
vancing their interests. Without e.xceptinn, 
those who know Mr. Bangs best have always 
said, "He is the right man in the right place," 
and if his friends were to name his leading 
characteristics they would say, "Executive 
ability, industry, kmdness. honesty and strict 
integrity." Some one has said of him, 
"Having successfully fought his own way 
through the difficulties which beset the poor 
boy's path, he is eminently fitted to sympa- 
thize with others similarly situated and to 
guide them to a like profitable course of 
action." As Mr. Bangs is yet in the prime 
of life we may expect still greater service in 
the years to come. 

Mr. Bangs was married August i. 1894, 
to Margaret R. Maloney. daughter of Dr. 
X. \'. and Anna (Krater) iMaloney, ui 
Washburn, Woodford county, Illino's. of 
which her father was one of the pioneers 



and prominent physicians. Both parents are 
now dead, the father dying in 1892 and the 
mother in 1898. Mrs. Bangs is a graduate 
of Monticello Seminary and was valedic- 
torian of her class. She was a remarkably 
successful teacher, her work being in the 
grammar school at Washburn, as superin- 
tentlent of schools at Rutland, La Salle coun- 
tv, for seven years, as i)rincipal (^f the Fair- 
bury high school, with Mr. Bangs as superin- 
tendent, and also in the I'ontiac townsliip 
high school. 

Mrs. Bangs was also a successful insti- 
tute instructor, and was at one time the Re- 
publican candidate for county superintendent 
of schools in Woodford county. Her popu- 
larity as a teacher was great and many 
a boy and girl marks a mile stone in true 
progress from the time they came under her 
influence. Some one has said. "She thinks 
of every one else first, herself last, or not 
at all." She is a member of the Presby- 
terian church, a teacher in the Sal)bath 
school, an officer in the county Sunday 
school (organization, secretary of the Asso- 
ciated Charities and an active sympathizer 
with the unfortunate everywhere. She is a 
woman of excellent literary attainments, is 
a ready writer, an able critic, has occasion- 
ally contributed to 'eading periodicals and 
has assisted in the ])reparatioti of several 
text-books. 



JOSEPH BROWX. 

Joseph Brown, a prominent farmer, who 
owns and operates one hundred and sixty 
acres of \'aluable land on section 19. Pleas- 
ant Ridge tow'nshi]>, Livingston county, Il- 
linois, was born in Camillus, Onondago 



314 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county, Xew York, September 7, 1840. 
His father, Jolm Brown, was lx>rn in Edin- 
btirg, Scotland, January 2, 1810, and when 
twenty \ears of age crossed the broad At- 
lantic and settled in Onondago county, Xew 
York, where he worked on a farm for a 
time. There he married Rebecca Conklin, 
a native of Fulton county, Xew York, 
and they continued to make their home 
in Onondago county until 1856, when 
the_\- came to Peoria, Illinois, where 
tlie father engaged in farming until 
the spring of 1868. On our sub- 
ject purchasing a tract of wild prairie 
land in Eppards Point township, Liv- 
ingston county, he came with him and 
made his home there with our subject 
in Pleasant Ridge township until his death, 
which occurred November 27, 1897. The 
mother, who was a consistent member of 
the ^lethodist Episcopal church, died in 
1852. 

The greater part of the early education 
of our suliject was obtained in the schools 
of Xew' York, though for a short time he 
attended school in Peoria. In early life he 
worked by the month as a farm hand for 
six years. On the 2d of August, 1862, he 
joined the boys in blue as a member of 
Company H, One Hundred and Twenty- 
second Xew York X'olunteer Infantry, and 
went first to \Vashington, D. C. He par- 
ticipated in the battles of Antietam, the 
^\'ilderness, Spotts_\-l\-ania, Cold Harbor, 
Gettysburg, INIine Run, and the engage- 
ments in the Shenandoah valley, being with 
Sheridan at Winchester, Strasburg and 
Fisher's Hill. They then joined Grant's 
army at Deep Bottom, and from that time 
until the close of the war were near the 
Potomac. Mr. Brown was in the front line 
of battle when Lee surrendered and par- 



ticipated in the grand review at Washing- 
ton, l)eing mustered out July 2, 1865. 

Returning to Peoria, he worked in the 
ciial mines there for two years, and then 
purchased a farm of eighty acres in Ep- 
pards Point township, Livingston county, 
upon which he made all of the improve- 
ments, but in 1883 he traded that property 
for his present farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Pleasant Ridge township, 
which at that time was only partially im- 
prLsxed. He has since thoroughly tiled the 
place, using from twenty-five to thirty thou- 
sand tiles, has planted an orchard and erected 
a good residence and barn, so that he now 
has one of the most desirable farms of its 
size in the township. Every foot of space 
is now available for cultivation. Besides 
this valuable farm. ]\Ir. Brown owns another 
one hundred and sixty-acre tract in Ford 
county, all of which has been acquired 
through liis own well-directed and ener- 
getic efforts since 1865. 

On the 24th of October, 1865, "Mr. 
Brown married Miss Emily L. Archdale, 
of Peoria. Her parents, XN'illiam and Sarah 
(Lacey) Archdale, who were born, reared 
and married in Yorkshire, England, came 
to the L'nited States in 1837, being among 
the pioneers of Peoria. The father died 
there August 15, 1870, the mother Xovem- 
ber 1, 1872, lo Mr. and Mrs. Brown were 
born eight children, namely: William L., 
born December 6, 1866, is a resident of 
Ford county, and has filled the office of 
school director. Alice M., born October 
29, 1869, is ow the wife of Edison Howe, 
of Windom, Minnesota, and they have three 
children: Joseph, born Februarv 16, 1894; 
Francis, born June 22, 1898; and Harry, 
born December 7, 1899. Charles R., born 
X"o\ember 24, 1872, lives in Ford count v. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



315 



He married Nellie Day and has two chil- 
dren: Emily P., born November 5. 1897; 
and ora, born September 20, 1899. Jo- 
seph, born March 26, 1878, is living at home 
and ser\ino- as school tlirector. Edwin, 
born February 6, 1881, and P'lorence. born 
May ig, 1883, are both at home. 

Mr. Brown is a member of Fairbury 
Post, No. 75. Cj. A. R., antl attemls and 
supports tlie .Metliodist Episcopal church. 
In bis political views be is a Republican, and 
has filled the offices of road commissioner 
and school director, serving in the latter 
position ten or fifteen years and always tak- 
ing a deep and conimendal)le interest in edu- 
cational affairs. In all the relations of life 
be has been found true to everv trust reposed 
in him, and has manifested his loyalty and 
patriotism in days of peace as well as in 
tune of w ar. 



CONRAD TRECKER. 

Among the representative business men 
of Livingston county none are more de- 
serving of representation in this volume 
than Conrad Trecker, the well-known tile 
manufacturer of Odell, who, through his 
own well-directed efforts, has gained a 
comfortable competence that numbers him 
among the substantial men of his commu- 
nity. He was born in Prussia, Germany, 
October 2, 1850, a son of Theodore and 
Elizabeth (Franken) Trecker, natives of the 
same place where the father followed the 
carpenter's trade, which he had learned when 
a young man. In 1852 he brought his 
family to America and first located in P-?ru, 
Illinois, where he lived four years, later 
making his home in Mendota, and following 



his trade in each place. In 1868 he i)ur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Union township. Livingston county, 
which he (leve!<>])ed fmm raw land into a 
good farm and which he successfully oper- 
ated until his death, dying in 1886, at the age 
of si.xty-three years. He was a self-made 
man, lia\ing no capital when he came to this 
country. In politics he was a Democrat, and 
in religious views both he and his wife were 
Catholics. She died in 1897, at the age 
of sixty-nine years, and the property in 
L'nion township was then divided among 
the children. The family consisted of the 
following named : William, a shoemaker of 
Cabrey, Illinois, died in 1884; Conrad is next 
in order of birth ; Peter, a farmer, died in 
Union township in 1881 ; Joseph is engaged 
in farming in that township, and owns a 
half interest in the tile works of which our 
subject has charge; Katrina is the wife of 
Charles Sieberg. of Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; 
Elizabeth is the wife of John Cheslie, of the 
same city: lillen died at the ln)me of her 
sister in Kankakee, in 1887; Christina is 
the wife of Peter Kettwich, of Peru, Illi- 
nois: and riicodorc is the owner of a ma- 
chine shop in -Milwaukee, ha\ing learned 
the trade when young. 

Conrad Trecker received only a limited 
common-school education, and during his 
boyhood he worked at farming and at the 
carpenter's trade with his father. After the 
latter purchased a farm our subject devoted 
his entire time and attention to its cultiva- 
tion until twenty-two years of age, and then 
commenced operating rented land on bis 
own account. He was married, in i>>j^, to 
Miss Nettie Meyer, who was born near 
Sandwich, Illinois, September 29, 1855. 
Her parents, Henry and Elizabeth Meyer, 
natives of Germanv, moved to Livingston 



i 



3i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county when she was but a small child. She 
was the eldest of their eight children, the 
others being William and Herman, both 
farmers of Union township, Livingston 
county; Albert, of Odell township; x\deline, 
wife of George Miley, of Odell; Martha, 
wife of William Bowers, of Odell; Norman, 
who died at the home of his father in Iowa, 
in 1898; and Frank, a resident of Sunbury 
township, Livingston county. The mother 
is deceased, but the father is still living and 
makes his home in Iowa. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Trecker have been born the following chil- 
dren: Theodore, who assists his father in 
his business; Elizabeth, who died in infancy; 
Katie and Nettie, both at home; Joseph, 
who died April 30, 1900; Addie, at home; 
Henry, who died in infancy; Annie, Marr 
and Conrad William, all at home. The 
children have had the advantages of a high- 
school education. 

After his marriage J\Ir. Trecker con- 
tmued farming and also managed and owned 
a corn sheller and threshing outfit. He 
commenced handling machinery at the age 
of eighteen years, and met with excellent 
success in that branch of his business, doing 
more work along that line than any other 
man in the community. He still owns an 
interest in an outfit, but does not personally 
attend to the business. In 1881 he pur- 
chased eighty acres of land i" L^nion town- 
ship, which he sold two years later on his 
removal to Odell, and bought a half interest 
in the old brick and tile yard, then operated 
by horse power. New buildings were 
erected, steam power put in, as well as pat- 
ent kilns, and the manufacture of tile was 
carried on on an extensive scale for five 
years. During the following two years 
Mr. Trecker engaged in the hardware and 
implement business, and at the end of four 



years he and his brother Joseph purchased 
the tile factory, which he now conducts in 
a most profitable and satisfactory manner, 
doing a business which has amounted to as 
much as twenty thousand dollars per year. 
In the meantime he added to his land posses- 
sions until he now owns two hundred and 
eighty acres of land, all under cultivation, 
and now divides his attention between tile 
manufacturing and farming. When he 
started out in life for himself he 
had no capital, but being a good man- 
ager, he has met with excellent suc- 
cess in his labors, and he is today 
one of the substantial citizens of his com- 
munity. For the past three years he has 
given considerable attention to the raising 
of brown Swiss cattle for dairy and beef 
purposes, owning some of the first brought 
to this part of the country. They were pur- 
chased by him at Roberts, Illinois, being 
imported stock from Switzerland. Mr. 
Trecker is a Democrat in politics, but has 
never found time to accept or hold any 
office. He and his family are members of 
the Catholic church of Odell, and he is also 
connected with the ^Mutual Aid Insurance 
Company. 



HERMAN' E. SIEGERT. 

No better illustration of the character- 
istic energy and enterprise of the typical 
German-American citizen can be found than 
that afforded by the career of this gentle- 
man, the well-known proprietor of the elec- 
tric light plant of Dwight, Illinois. Com- 
ing to this country with little capital except 
his abilities, he has made his way to success 
through wisely-directed effort and he can 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



317 



now look back with satisfaction upon past 
struggles. 

yh. Siegert was born May 26, 1830, in 
Xeudam, Badenburg, Germany, in which 
country his parents, Gotlieb and Sophia 
(Siegert) Siegert, spent their entire lives. 
His father was a paper manufacturer of 
Xeudam-by-Custrin, where he was born, and 
he inherited the factory from the grand- 
father of our subject. He did quite an im- 
portant business, which he continued up to 
the time of his death. He died in 1836, 
at the age of forty-five years, and his wife 
departed this life in 1861, at the age of 
about sixty-one. There were two other 
children in their family, namely : Amelia, 
who married and died in Germany ; and 
Hannah, who is the wife of Frederick Mil- 
ler, a printer of that country, near the old 
home. 

Herman E. Siegert, the only son, re- 
mained with his mother until twenty-two 
years of age. At the age of sixteen he com- 
menced learning the millers trade at Quart- 
shan, where he spent four years, and then 
workeil as a journeyman miller and mill- 
wright in various places for seven years. 
In June, 1857, he sailed from Bremen on 
the Asia, a sailing vessel, which, after a 
\oyage of se\en weeks, landed him in New 
York. He proceeded at once to Chicago, 
and from there to Somonauk, Illinois, where 
he was engaged in erecting a steam gristmill 
for a Mr. Bliss, and remained in that town 
for two years, working at the carpenter's 
trade. From there he went to Morris, Illi- 
nois, where he engaged in building a mill 
and operating it for five years. 

While there Mr. Siegert was married, 
in October, 1863, to Miss Magdalene Born- 
man, a native of Hohenvard, Saxon Wimer, 
Eisenher, the place where Martin Luther 



was imprisoned. She came to America 
with her cousin and lived with relatives in 
Morris, Illinois, until her marriage. By 
this union were born seven children, of 
whom five li\e, namely : Sophia, who was 
born in 1864, and is now the wife of Leon- 
ard G. Hahn, a grain dealer of Dwight; 
George, who was born in 18O5, and is now 
a resident of Los Angeles, California : John 
C, born in 1868, and Henry E., born in 
1 870, who now have charge of their father's 
business; and Herman C, born in 1872, a 
minister of the Lutheran church at Pipe 
Stone, Minnesota; Anna and .Mary, twins, 
born in July, 1869, died at the age of about 
six months. 

On leaving Morris, Mr. Siegert moved 
to Channahon, Will county, Illinois, where 
he leased a gristmill and successfully oper- 
ated it for two years and a half. On the i:t 
of April, 1867, he came to Dwight, and in 
company with ^lichael Hahn bought the 
old stone mill at that place, where he car- 
ried on business in partnership for ten years, 
at the end of which time Mr. Siegert pur- 
chased his partner's interest and operated 
it alone until 1891, when he put in an elec- 
tric light plant, the first in Dwight. As the 
latter business increased in importance and 
the demand for more light, he ga\e up mill- 
ing at the end of tliree years and converted 
the old stone mill into his jiresent electric 
light plant. This is supplied with a Cor- 
liss engine of one hundred and seventy-five 
horse-power, three dynamos, one for arc 
and two for incandescent lights, there being 
thirty arc lights used in the town and 
tv.elve hundred incandescent lights. His 
sons, John C. and Henry E., now attend to 
the active business. 

Mr. Siegert has a comfortable home in 
Dwight, erected by him in 1871. In poll- 



3i8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tics he is independent, and in his social re- 
lations is connected with the Independent 
Order of Mutual Aid. He and his family 
hiikl membership in the Lutheran church, 
and he has ever taken an active part in its 
\vork. serving as an officer of the church 
for many years. For the success that he 
has achie\-ed he deserxes great credit, it 
being due entire!)' tn his own industry, per- 
severance and good management, and he has 
not only won a comfortable competence, but 
has secured the high regard of all with whom 
he has come in contact by his upright, hon- 
orable life. He spent the spring of 1900 
in visiting old friends and the familiar 
scenes of his bovhood home in Germanv. 



EXXO FLESSXER. 

Enno Flessner, who is engaged in the 
general mercantile business in the village of 
Cullom, Livingston county, has been a resi- 
dent of the county since 1888. He was born 
in Ostfriesland, province of Hanover, Ger- 
many, February 15, 1856, and is a son of 
Joannes and Almuth Flessner, both of whom 
were born in the same province and there 
spent their entire li\es. They were the par- 
ents (if ti\e children, of whom one died in 
childhiKid. Helena is the wife nf Jerre 
Gulmers, and they li\e in Charlotte town- 
ship. Li\'ingston county, where he is en- 
gaged in farming. Gretchen died in the old 
country. Enno is the subject of this sketch. 
Herman died in Germany. The father was 
reared to the mercantile business, which he 
followed during life and in which he met 
with gratifying success. He was also the 
owner of a farm, which was operated by 
hired help, he devoting his time to his mer- 
cantile business. 



The subject of this sketch was reared in 
his native coimtry and received a good high- 
school education. At a \ery early age he 
entered his father's store, and when not in 
school was generally assisting in the store. 
At the age of twenty he went into the 
army and served three years with his regi- 
ment in Berlin. Returning home at the 
expiration of his term of service, he there 
remained until 1883, when he resoh'ed on 
emigrating to the new world. 

Leaving his native land, Mr. Flessner 
crossed the ocean and came direct to Liv- 
igston county, Illinois, to first visit a sister. 
He remained here for two years, and then 
went to Iroquois county, Illinois, where he 
engaged in farming for two years. \Miile 
residing in that county, in 1886, he was 
united in marriage to ]Miss Sarah Ricken, 
a native of Illinois, born in 1865. of Ger- 
man parents. Six children have come to 
bless their union : — John, George. Alma, 
Fred. Charles and ^larie. The four first 
named are attending the public schools of 
Cullom. 

After his marriage, Mr. Flessner con- 
tinued on the farm in Irocpiois county 
until 1887. when he returned to Li\ingston 
county and located in the village of Char- 
lotte, where he formed a partnership with 
Mr. Bruns erected a store building and put 
in a general stock of merchandise. The 
business was conducted one Aear by the firm 
with good success, when Mr. Flessner s^ild 
out to his partner, and in 1888 moved to 
Cullom, where he rented a building and put 
in a small stock of goods. As the volume 
of his trade increased he enlarged his stock, 
and now carries a \ery complete line of 
dry-goods, groceries, ladies' and gents' fur- 
nishing goods, queensware. and in fact 
everything contained in a general store 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3>9 



suited to tlie wants of tlie community. He 
lias met with gratifying success and iias a 
trade of wliicli the more ])retentious mer- 
chants of a larger town might well be 
proud, lie owns a neat, modern residence, 
which he has lately erected, and is acknowl- 
edged as one of the leading and successful 
husiness men of the place, one worthy of 
the coiitidence and respect in whicii he is 
held. 

In politics ^Ir. Flessner is a Republican. 
He has been a member of the town board for 
se\eral terms, and as a member of the board 
has taken ad\aiiced \iews in everything 
where the l;)est interests of the peo[)'e were 
at stake. He was on the coniniittee on per- 
manent sidewalks and advocated the polic;' 
of ha\ing the best suitable for tlic place, 
in the spring of 1900 he was elected r. mem- 
ber of the school board. He is a member 
t)f the Evangelical Eutheran church of Cul- 
loni, and has been one of its trustees, and 
is now serving as treasurer of the church. 
Interested in the work of the church, he has 
always contributed generously of his means 
for its support. 



JOEL WALLACE WHITMIRE, M. D. 

Joel Wallace Whitniire, M. D.. of Forrest, 
Illinois, is one of the leading physicians of 
Livingston county and surgeon for both the 
Wabash and Toledo, Peoria and Warsaw 
Railroads. He was born in Metamora, 
Woodford county, October 25, 185 1, and 
is a son of Dr. James S. and Sidney (Rob- 
inson ) Whitniire. The father was born in 
\'irgiiiia. in 1821, and in childliood removed 
to Ohio with his parents. The grandfa- 
ther Whitniire was a tanner and currier by 

17 



trade, and on his removal from Sidney, 
Ohio, to \'irginia, Cass county, Illinois, look 
with him a stock of leather, whicli he con- 
verted into boots and shoes for the early 
settlers. As a minister of the New Light 
church, he also preached at that place for 
some time. Later he became identified 
with the Lliristian church, and always took 
an active part in church work. His last 
days were spent in Johnson county, Texas. 
Our subject's father. Dr. James S. Whit- 
mire, began the study of medicine with Dr. 
Kyle, of Macomb, Illinois, and later was 
graduated at the old Illinois Medical Col- 
lege, in Jacksonville. In 1846 he settled at 
Metamora, Illinois, where he engaged in 
practice until 185 1, when he took his degree 
at Rush Medical College, Chicago. He 
returned to practice in Metamora, and later 
took a third course at Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, Philadelphia. During the Civil war 
he served as assistant surgeon with the Sixth 
Illinois Regiment of cavalry one year, and 
was then transferred to the Fifty-sixth Illi- 
nois Infantry as surgeonof Greene 11 Raum's 
regiment, w itli which he remained until after 
the battle of \'icksburg, when he took charge 
of his brother's private practice, allowing 
the latter to go to Springfield and serve as 
examining surgeon. He was one of the 
most prominent physicians and surgeons of 
his section of the state, and was also a prom- 
inent charter member of tlie Woodford 
County Medical Society and the North Cen- 
tral Medical Society. The State Medical 
Society had only been organized a short 
time when he joined it. and he has served as 
its vice-president a number of times, and 
was i)resident for the first two, and an ex- 
tensive writer for medical journals through- 
out life. Socially he was a member of the 
(jrand .\rniy of the Republic and the Ma- 



320 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sonic order. He died in July, 1897. 
On the 4th of July, 1846, he married ]\Iiss 
Sidney Robinson, a native of Morgan coun- 
tv. Illinois, and a daughter of Joel Rol)in- 
son, an early settler of that county, for- 
merly of Ohio, where the families had been 
intimate. The Robinsons were also from 
Virginia. At his death the father of our 
subject had three living children. 

Dr. Joel W. Whitmire acquired his early 
education in the scliools of Metamora and 
later attended the Soldiers' College at Ful- 
ton, Illinois, and then Eureka College- for 
two years, finishing the junior year. He 
commencetl the stud_\- of medicine with his 
father, and took his first course of lectures 
at Rush Medical College, Chicago, in the 
winter of 1874-5, graduating from that 
noted institution in tlie spring of 1877. It 
is a peculiar fact that the father had two 
brothers who read with him and graduated 
from the same school, and also three sons 
and one nephew. The other sons were Dr. 
Clarence L., who was engaged in practice 
at Sublette, Illinois, and later at W'averly, 
Iowa, where he died; and Dr. Zach- 
ariah Lincoln, of L'rbana, Illinois, who died 
in 1899. After his graduation our subject 
was engaged in practice with his father for 
eight years, and then came to Forrest, where 
he has successfully followed his chosen pro- 
fession for fifteen years, being acknowl- 
edged one of the best and most skillful phy- 
sicians and surgeons in the eastern part of 
the county. For some years he has been 
surgeon for the Wabash and Toledo, 
Peoria and Warsaw Railroads, and his duties 
•were quite arduous when their shops were 
located in Forrest. He is also a member of 
the examining board for pensions, of which 
he is treasurer; has been a member of the 
board of health sf)me years, and was the 



first to inaugurate the strict quarantine of 
certain contagious diseases. He is exam- 
iner for all the old-line life insurance com- 
panies doing business in Forrest, and for 
a time was engaged in the drug business at 
that place. Fraternally he is an honored 
member of the \\'oodford County, the 
Xorth Central and the State Medical So- 
cieties. 

In September, 1877, Dr. Whitmire mar- 
ried Miss Laura Xorthcott, of Christian 
county, a relative of Lieutenant-Governor 
Xorthcott, and to them have been born two 
children, ^lary ]\Iaude June and Sidney. 
The family have a beautiful home in the 
west part of town, and attend the Christian 
church, of which ]\Irs. Whitmire is a mem- 
ber. The Doctor affiliates with the iMa- 
sonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, He 
joined the last named fraternity at Mata- 
mora and was past grand there. In politics 
he is an ardent Republican, and has fre- 
quently been a delegate to different con- 
ventions of his party, including the state 
conventions, and has served as a member 
of the township board. 



HOX. MICHAEL CLEAR Y. 
Hon. ]\Iichael Cleary, who is represent- 
in the twentieth district as a member of the 
General Assembly of Illinois, and who for 
more than a quarter of a century has repre- 
sented his township as a member of the coun- 
ty board of supervisors of Livingston coun- 
ty, was born in Clonmell, county Tipperary, 
Ireland. February 9, 1840, and is a son of 
Philip and Mary (Hefferman) Cleary, the 
mother being a cousin of Colonel Heffer- 
man, of Bloomington, who ser\ed on the 
staff of Governor Altgeld. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



321 



Philip Cleary was a farmer in county 
Tii)i)erary, Ireland, on a ]ilacc which had 
hceii the home of tlie famil\- lor many gen- 
erations. Hearing so much of the great 
United States, and with that laudable desire 
to better provide for his family, he emigrated 
with them to tliis country in 1840, landing at 
Philadelphia on the 25th of May, our sub- 
ject being then but a few montlis old. From 
Philadelphia lie went direct to Youngstown, 
Ohio, where he found em])loyment. with 
others, in di.eging the Hocking Valley canal. 
He remained at Youngstown one year and 
then came to Illinois, locating at Spring 
Creek, now Spring \'alley, Bureau county, 
where he engaged in farming. In 1845 he 
moved to Grundy county, Illinois, and was 
working on the Illinois canal when it was 
opened up the second time. He continued 
to work on the canal until its completion, 
in 1848, when he located near Ottawa, La 
Salle county, and again resumed farming. 

While residing in Bureau county Philip 
Clarey hauled his grain to Chicago with oxen. 
There were there no bridges and all the 
streams had to be forded. The grain was 
development of the home farm and in due 
the wagon the more easily and carried across 
the sltnighs when the oxen stuck in the mud. 
Clothing for the family was all home-made, 
and all were thankful for what they could 
get. The family were among the first Cath- 
olics to locate in Bureau county, and they 
had to go to Peru to attend religious services. 
While residing in Ottawa, in 1861, thei 
mother died, and in 1868 the father came 
to Livingston county and made his home 
with our subject until his death, in 1884. 
He was a firm believer in the Catholic relig- 
ion and gave liberally for the support of the 
Catholic church. 

When the familv moved to Ottawa our 



subject was about eight years old. From 
that time nn he was of assistance in the 
time was thoroughly conversant with the 
details of farm work. He was educated in 
the schools of Ottawa, but the broad gen- 
eral information which he now possesses was 
principally obtained in the school of ex- 
perience. Like a dutiful son, he remained 
at home and assisted his parents until he 
was twentv-one years old, when he began 
life for himself, and that his life has been 
a successful one is fully attested by the 
recortl here given. 

On the 14th of .\ugust. 1865. Mr. Cleary 
was united in marriage with Miss Ellen 
Burke, of Sandwich, Illinois, but a native 
of county Tipperary, Ireland, and daughter 
of Jeffrey Burke, who was also born in coun- 
ty Tipperary. By this union ten children 
were born, all of whom are yet li\ing. \Vill- 
iam P. is now a druggist in Odell, Illinois. 
Hon. Jnhii M. graduatetl from the law de- 
partment of the \\'esleyan University, of 
Bloomington. with the degree of LL. B. 
He is now one of the leading attorneys of 
Kansas City, Missouri, and is a member of 
the legislature of that state. Katherine, 
Alice, Ellen and Lillie are each graduates of 
the best convent schools of the country. 
Frank. .Albert, Joseph and Leo are engaged 
in farming. All of them have had good ed- 
ucational and other advantages. 

Immediately after his marriage Mr. 
Cleary rented a farm near Ottawa, Illinois, 
and engaged in general farming and stock 
raising. With limited capital, but with un- 
bounded courage and steadfast determina- 
tion, he began farming, and in three years 
he accumulated means sufficient to purchase 
a farm for himself. In 1868 he came to 
Livingston county and purchased the south 
half of section i, Odell township, and at 



322 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



once began its improvement. The land was 
in its virgin state and the first thing neces- 
sary was the erection of a house for his fam- 
ily. This done, he set out a hedge fence, 
broke the ground and cammenced tilling the 
soil. That first three hundred and twenty 
acres he yet owns, but he has added to his 
possessions until he has thirteen hundred 
acres in the vicinity, all of which it under 
the highest state of cultivation. Being a 
broad guaged man he has ever been willing 
to learn and to adopt any theory or sugges- 
tion that seemed best, and which would in- 
crease the value of his farm and possessions. 
He constructed the first ditches for drain- 
ing in his vicinity, and also laid the first 
tile, hauling the same a distance of fifteen 
miles. In 1879 he moved "out of the old 
house into the new." At that time he built 
and now occupies one of the finest houses in 
Livingston county, and which, when erected, 
was far superior to any. The large elegant 
parlors, with their furnishings, would grace 
a modern city home. 

Mr. Cleary has also one of the finest 
barns in the state, which was erected about 
the same time that his house was built. It 
is occupied by grain bins and by his horses, 
being used for cattle, while the second story 
is occupied by grain bins and by his hoi'Ses, 
and the third floor for agricultural imple- 
ments and hay. He has bins for six thou- 
sand bushels of oats, and from the bins, 
b)- means of spouts, the grain is carried 
to the basement. He has also large cribs for 
corn, of which a great quantity is always 
kept on hand for feeding purposes. 

While carrying on general farming Mr. 
Cleary has been especially interested in the 
importation and breeding of the best grades 
of cattle and hogs. He had the first Poland 
China hogs in the countv, and did much to 



secure the general introduction of this breed, 
to the great benefit of all farmers. He al- 
ways has upon his place a large number of 
short-horned cattle, which he feeds and pre- 
pares for the market. He has been one of 
the most successful farmers in the county, 
being thoroughly progressive in all things. 
While others complained of the times and 
of Providence, he worked, and the result 
is plainly to be seen. In addition to his Liv- 
ingston county property he owns a half- 
section of well improved land in Iowa, and 
a full section in South Dakota. 

In politics Mr. Cleary has always been 
a Democrat and since he attained his ma- 
jority he has always taken an active interest 
in political affairs. He has never been able 
to see the necessity of leaving political af- 
fairs to the professional men and to the ward 
politician, but believes that every man should 
take such interest in public matters as will 
elevate politics and make better citizens. 
Since coming to Livingston county he has 
had large influence in moulding public opin- 
ion and in the dissemination of Democratic 
jirinciples. He has served on the county cen- 
tral committee of his party and has repeat- 
edly been a delegate to its state conventions. 
In 1892 he was one of the Cleveland electors 
and had the honor of being a member of the 
electoral college that elected a president, an 
honor that comes to but few. 

Although in a Republican township Mr. 
Cleary, in 1874, was elected to represent it 
as a member of the board of supervisors, 
and from that time to the present has been 
continuously re-elected, and is now the old- 
est member of the board in point of serxice. 
His influence on the board has always been 
felt and for many years he served as its 
president. When not chairman of the gen- 
eral board he has usuallv serx'ed as chairman 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



323 



of some of its most important committees. 
During his first year the e<-ection of the pres- 
ent court house of tlie county was com- 
menced, tlie old building having been de- 
stroyed by fire July 4, 1874. He has been 
chairman of the county farm committee, and 
of the public projierty committee, and in 
every position he has acted for the best gond 
of the public. Under the new re\enue law 
creating a l)()ard of public review, he was 
chairman of that board in 1899. 

In iS8j Mr. Cleary was elected a mem- 
ber of the legislature and was re-elected in 

1884 and in 1886. During his first term 
he introduced into the bouse the present 
tarni drainage law, which was supported in 
the senate by Hon. George Torrance. In 

1885 he secured the passage in the house of 
a bill to regulate charges in the stock yards, 
which was known as the stock _\-ards l)ilh 
but it was defeated in the senate, for the 
reason that that lxidy seemed more friendly 
to corporations. In 1887 he secured the pas- 
sage of the game bill for the protection of 
wild fowl, which liill passed the senate and 
became a law. .\fter an interval of ten 
years Mr. Cleary was again nominated by his 
l)arty and was elected to the legislature. In 
the session of 1898-99 he introduced a l)ill 
into the house limiting the rate of interest 
in the state to five per cent. The monied in- 
terests were too strong for him and the bill 
failed of passage. It will be seen, however, 
that when a member of the General Assem- 
bly Mr. Cleary was an active one, and all 
his acts were in the interest of the people. 
His princi])al work has been in the committee 
room, but whether in committee or on the 
lloor of the house he has always exerted 
a commanding influence. 

Realizing the benefits of a good educa- 
tion Mr. Cicarv has alwavs been a friend 



of the public schools, and for many years 
served as a member of the school board, 
and it is safe to say that his influence was 
always for the general grxxl and for im- 
proved methods. While Catholic in re- 
ligion, he is liberal in his views, and is will- 
ing to grant to others the same liberty he 
asks for him.self in religious afifairs, and he 
numbers among his strongest friends those 
of the J'rotestant religion. For the erection 
of churches he has ever been a liberal con- 
tributtjr, it mattered not what the denomina- 
tion represented, lie is a member of St. 
I'aul's Catholic church of Odell, and was 
the treasin-er oi the committee of five who 
built and paid for the church before even a 
priest hatl locatetl there. He was one of 
the first members of the Catholic church in 
his vicinity. His wife and family are also 
members of the same church. 

For nearly a third of a centurv Mr. 
Cleary has been a citizen of Livingston 
count}', and no man within its borders is 
better known, or who has more earnest, 
steadfast frientls. With few advantages in 
his youth, and starting in life for himself 
with very limited means, he has labored 
early and late, in sunshine and in shade, 
initil to-day he is numbered among the most 
prosper(nis residents of the county, sur- 
rounded by all the comforts and many of the 
lu.xuries of life, and more than all, by a 
contented and happy family, a loving wife; 
who has been a helpmeet indeed to him, and 
children hel])ful to him as age creeps on. 
In the years that ha\e pasesd he has not 
selfishly given his entire time and best ener- 
gies to the material welfare of himself and 
family, but has given much time and his 
best thoughts to the general good of the 
community in which he has lived. As a 
member of the county board o^ supervisors, 



324 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and legislative halls, he has made his mark, 
and the confidence and respect in which he 
is held by those who knriw him best is at- 
tested by his continual re-election to office. 
A thorough, progressive and energetic 
farmer, a wise legislator, a good, substan- 
tial citizen and a faithful friend, such, in- 
deed, is Hon. jNIichael Cleary, of Living- 
ston county. 



AAROX JAAIES BEXXETT. 

Aaron James Bennett, a representative 
farmer of A\'oca township, Livingston coun- 
ty, was born in the house now occupied by 
him, February 28, 1865, and is a son of 
John and Rachel (Shaw) Bennett, both of 
whom were born in Cape May, X^ew Jerse\', 
and in early life moved with their respective 
parents to Ohio, but after spending one 
winter in that state the families went to 
Indiana, settling near Rossville. It was 
there that the parents of our subject were 
united in marriage, and there the father be- 
gan a successful career as a farmer and also 
did teaming from Chicago to Lafayette, In- 
diana. In 1852 he came to Livingston 
county, Illinois, and rented land in Avoca 
township for three years. He then pur- 
chased one hundred and twenty acres of 
government land, which is now a part of the 
old homestead farm. By hard work and 
untiring perseverance he converted this wild 
tract into a fine farm, adding to its value 
by erecting modern buildings, fencing, til- 
ing and otherwise improving the same. He 
also purchased other land until he now owns 
a half-section, which has nearly all been 
improved by himself or under his direction. 
In 1888 he purchased a comfortable home 



in Fairbur}', where he now resides, and 
where his wife died in 1890. lu politics 
he is a stanch Republican, and being a well- 
educated and popular man, has been elected 
to numerous offices in his township, serving 
as collector some time, supervisor six years, 
and trustee of the school district a number of 
}'ears. 

The suliject of this sketch is the seventh 
in order of birth in a family of eight chil- 
dren, the others being as follows : Sarah, 
who lives with her father in Fairbury; Ma- 
rian, wife of Joshua Mills, of Springfield, 
Ilhnois; W. Scott, also at home; John E., 
a resident of Thawville, Illino.s; George 
H., a resident of Bell Prairie township; 
Emma, wife of John Mitten, an employe of 
Walton Brothers, of Fairbury; and Alary 
D., at home. 

Aaron J. Bennett attended the district 
schools near his boyhood home, also took 
a course in the public schools of Fairbury, 
and later was a student at Onarga for a few 
months. He grew to manhood upon his 
father's farm, assisting in its operation until 
he attained man's estate, and he now rents 
the place, being successfully engaged in the 
cultivation of two hundred acres. He is 
also interested in stock raising, which he 
finds cjuite profitable. 

In 1888 Mr. Bennett was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Clara Davis, who was born 
in Ohio in 1868. Her parents, Eben and 
Dorothy (Maurice) Davis, still reside in 
that state. Clara is the oldest of their four 
children; Rose is the wife of Fred Liedolf, 
of Fort Wayne, Indiana; Edward is a resi- 
dent of Lima, Ohio ; and Harry is a mem- 
ber of the Fourth United States Infantry, 
and is now with the army in the Philippines. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bennett have two children: 
Walter R., born June 20, 1889; and Rachel 



THE BIOGRArHICAL RECORD. 



325 



D.. born July 22, 1890. are both attending 
tlie district scliool. 

By liis balUit Mr. ]jennett supports tlic 
men and measures of the Repulilican parly 
and is an active worker at the polls, li" iking 
alter the \<-)ters of his districe. Fur nine 
years lie served as school director, as schno! 
trustee two years, and was then apponited 
school treasurer, which position he now 
liolds. He has never sought office, but when 
elected has served the people faithfully and 
well. He is upright and honorable in all 
his dealings and sujjports church work, hieing 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Fairbury, as is his wife. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Mutual Aid Society df 
F'airburv. 



THOM.\S J. O'COXXOK. 

Thomas J. O'Connor, a well-to-do and 
successful farmer residing on section 6, 
Ciermanville tiiwnship, Livingston county, 
is a native' of Illinois, born in La Salle coun- 
ty. March 19, 1861, and is a son of Timothy 
and Margaret (Murphy) O'Connor. The 
father, a native of Ireland, came to the 
L'nited States at the age of nineteen, ami 
1 1 veil for some years in Xew York state 
before coming to Illinois. He engaged in 
farming near Ottawa, La Salle county, un- 
til the fall of 1868, when he moved to Liv- 
ingstDii county, taking up his residence in 
Charlotte tuvvnship, where he purchased a 
farm of eighty acres. Later he added to it 
until he had one hundred and sixty acres, 
and successfully engaged in its operation for 
some years, but is now living a retired life 
in Cliatsworth, where he located in the spring 
of 1892. He made all of the improvements 
I- on his place and transformed the wild 



land into a highly productive farm. His 
wife is still living, as are also five of their 
six children, our subject being the oldest. 

louring his boyhood and youth Thomas 
J. O'Connor attended the jjublic schools, and 
remained at home with his parents, assist- 
ing in the work of the farm, until they re- 
moved to Cliatsworth. He served as clerk 
of Charlotte township seven years, and al- 
wavs took a deep and commendable interest 
in imblic affairs. In the spring of 1892 he 
removed ti> ( lernianville township and 
bought the farm nf one hundred and sixtv 
acres which is now his home. He has since 
made nianv improvements mi the place, and 
has one of the most desirable farms of its 
size in the township. He is now serving 
as town clerk of (iennanville, ai!d has al- 
ready become prominently identified with 
the interests of that section of the county. 

On the 26th of October, 1887, in Chats- 
worth. Mr. O'Connor was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Julia Murphy, a daughter 
of Patrick .Murphy, of La Salle county, who 
is now engaged in farming in Cliatsworth 
township, hour children bless this imion, 
who.se names and dates of birth are as fol- 
lows : lunniet, .\pril 17, 1889: \era. De- 
cember 27. i8(jo: Lucile, April 2. 1892; 
and Julia, Septemljer 8, 1898. The first 
two were born in Charlotte township, the 
others in (iermanvilie township. 



THOMAS AXDKEWS. 

Thomas Andrews, of Pontiac. Illinois, 
is now living a retired life in the enjoy- 
ment of a rest which he has truly earned 
and richly deserves by reason of his indus- 
trious efforts of former years. Acconi- 



326 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



plislinient and progress ever imply labor, 
energy and diligence, and it was these quali- 
ties which enabled our subject to rise from 
the ranks of the many and stand among the 
successful few. He is one of the highly 
respected citizens of Pontiac, and his long 
residence in Livingston county and the 
active part he has taken in its development 
well entitle him to representation in its his- 
tory. 

Mr. Andrews was born in Stamford, 
Lincolnshire, England, October i6, 1S44, a 
son of James and Elizabeth (Plowright) 
Andrews, natives of the same place. In 
1855 the family emigrated to the United 
States and located near Tonica, La Salle 
county, Illinois, where the father worked 
and rented property for some time until he 
accumulated enough to purchase land, ex- 
periencing all the hardships and trials of 
pioneer life. On landing in this state he 
had hut five dollars remaining and a wife 
and six children to support. They received 
twenty-five ilollars at Cleveland, sent them 
by Mrs. Andrews' sister, but, having lost the 
address of the man who was to identify him, 
Mr. Andrews found considerable troulile in 
securing the money. It was during the panic 
tha the located here, which made it much 
more difficult for liim to secure a start, but 
after a few years of hard work he was al)le 
to purchase three hundred and twenty acres 
of wild land from the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company by having enough money to 
pay the interest on the amount, but going 
in debt for the principal. He would shell 
corn with a small sheller, and after hauling 
it to (h'idley over very bad roads would 
only recei\'e ten cents per ])ushel for the 
crop. Steadily and persistently he worked 
his way upward to success, paying for his 
place and transforming it into a fine farm. 



with good and substantial buildings sur- 
rounded by trees, while the land was placed 
under a high state of cultivation. He en- 
gaged in stock raising in connection with 
farming and became quite well-to-do, though 
he at first thought he would feel independ- 
ent if he ever got a good team of his own. 
He was recognized as one of the leading 
men of his community, and was called upon 
to serve as highway commissioner, school 
director and fill other local offices of honor 
and trust. Religiously he was a Congre- 
gationalist. He died upon his farm Au- 
gust 6, 1883, leaving a family of nine chil- 
dren, of whom our subject is the oldest. 
He ga\'e each of his sons forty acres of 
land, which they have since traded so that 
it might all belong to a few of them. The 
mother died October 30, 1899. She would 
h.ave been se\enty-fnur years of age had she 
li\-ed until the following February. 

Thomas Andrews received his educa- 
tion in the schools of his native land, his 
school days being over when he came to this 
country, for, being the oklest in the family, 
he was obliged ti help in their support. 
On account of his }-outh he was discouraged 
from entering the armv during the civil 
war. He remained with his parents until 
past the age of nineteen years and then went 
to Eureka, Illinois, where he worked four 
months. Returning to Tonica, La Salle 
county, he rented land, antl while there was 
married. May i, 1866, to Miss Mary E. 
Brady, a daughter of James and Elizabeth 
(Moore) Brady, natives of Brown county, 
Ohio, of which her paternal grandfather 
was one of the pioneers. Her grandfather, 
Mr)ses Moore, spent his entire life there as 
a farmer, and there her parents also died, 
the mother when Mrs. Andrews was only 
two months old. and the father a few vears 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



327 



later. He was a blacksmith by trade. She 
was raised by an aunt, with whom she came 
to Tonica, Illinois. 

Of the seven children born to Mr. and 
jNIrs. Andrews, three died in infancy. Those 
living are James H., a business man of Grid- 
ley, Illinois, who married Minnie Settle and 
has four children, Thomas, Amy E., Henry 
and an infant; Sarah Ann, who married H. 
U. Grant, of EUettsville. Indiana, and has 
one child, Delos Andrews; Susan Elizabeth, 
who married Joseph Solon, of Graymont, 
this county, and has four children, Florence, 
Helen, Duane and Evaline; and Mary Eva- 
line, who is teaching in the public schools 
of I'ontiac. The children all received good 
educations, the father having left the farm 
and nii)\ed to town f(_>r that purpose. 

In the fall of 1S6S Mr. Andrews bought 
eighty acres of land in Rock Creek town- 
ship, which he improved and paid for in six 
years, and then sold, buying one hundred 
and sixty acres of land east of Pontiac in 
1875. ^ his land was entirely unimproved 
and \ery wet, on which account it was C(.)n- 
sidered very undesirable property, but he 
tiled it and to-day has one of the best farms 
in Pontiac township. lie erected thereon 
a good residence, substantial nutluiildings, 
set out shade trees, and made many other 
improvements which add greatlv to its 
\alue and attractive appearance. Leaving 
the farm, which he still owns, he moved to 
Cayuga, where he was successfully en- 
gaged in merchandising for some years 
and a resident for eleven years, but since 
1893 has lived in Pontiac, having built a 
pleasant residence on Xorth Main street. 
He has owned property in Cayuga, but sold 
it, autl now has two hundred acres of im- 
priived rich land near Hamlet, Indiana, not 
far from South Bend. In improving two 



farms for him.self and aiding in the de\-elop- 
ment of his father's place he has materially 
ad\anced the interests of his adopted coun- 
ty and promoted its prosperity. He and 
his wife are active meml)ers of the Methodist 
Epi.scopal church, and are honored and 
highl)' respected by their fellow citizens who 
appreciate their sterling wurtli and mauv 
excellencies of character. 



WILLIAM E. HDKE. 

William E. Hoke, a well-known real- 
estate dealer of Odell. Illinois, was born in 
Williamsburg, I'ennsylvania, October 2, 
1S56, a son of Samuel and Laura X. (Ken- 
ney) Hoke, and a grandson of Jacob Hoke, 
who was of old Pennsylvania stock and a 
soldier of the Revolutionary war. The 
father was born in McConnellsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, April 12, 1824, and when a young 
man learned the trades of cabinet-maker and 
painter at Gettysburg. In 1859 he brought 
his family to Livingston county, Illinois, 
and purchased a farm four and a halt miles 
southeast of Odell. 

On that place our subject grew to man- 
hood and atended the common schocils of the 
neighborhood. Being injured at the age 
of fourteen years and unable to engage in 
active labor, he entered the Odell high 
school two years later, and later engaged 
in teaching school. At the age of twenty- 
to years he became a stutlent at Lincoln 
L'niversity, Lincoln, Illinois, but his health 
failed before he had completed the course 
antl he was obliged to gi\e up study. He 
tlien taught school until twenty-four, when 
he was appointed postmaster at Kmington. 
during President Hayes' administration, at 



328 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Avhicli time the town was started, and he 
completed tlie second building in the place, 
opening a hardware store there. He 
also named the town in honor of the wife 
of the owner of the land on which it was 
located, her name lieing Emma. As the 
first postmaster he installed the office and 
got it in good running order, but at the end 
of two years his health again failed and he 
was compelled to resign his office and sell 
his business. He had built up a good trade 
and was doing a successful business. He 
then went to Pella, Iowa, for Herbert 
Spencer & Company, to open a hardware 
store for \'an Houten Brothers. 

^\'hi!e there Mr. Hoke was married, 
J\Iarch J3, 1882, to ^liss Sophia Robinson, 
who was born in La Salle county, Illinois, 
March 25, i860, and was there reared and 
educated. Her father, James Robinson, 
of Peru, Illinois, was also a native of La 
Salle county, a representative of one of its 
oldest families, and spent his last days on the 
homestead taken up from the government. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hoke hail three children : 
Laura M., who was born April 13, 1882, 
and died at the age of two years : Harry 
Harvey, born January 13, 1884: and Albert 
E., born October 4, 1885. The .sons are 
still in school. The name of Harvey is an 
old one in the famil}^, it being the maiden 
name of Mrs. Hoke's maternal great-grand- 
mother, who traced her ancestry back to 
Lord Harvey. 

After eight months spent in Iowa, Mr. 
Hoke returned to Livingston county, Illi- 
nois, and rented his father's farm near Odell 
for three years. He met with success in 
his farming operations, but was crippled by 
barbed wire, which resulted in blood poison- 
ing, and he lost all he had in his efforts to 
save his life. In 1888 he located in Odell, 



where he has since engaged in the real- 
estate business, and has been remarkably 
successful in that undertaking. He has 
handled a large amount of western property 
in Iowa and ^linnesota. and his patrons, who 
are mostly his frientls, have been well satis- 
fied with their investments. He has sold 
many thousand acres of land, in one year 
disposing of twenty-one thousand acres, and 
has secured good homes for hundreds of 
people, whom he has sent to those states. 
Since buying a home for himself in Odell 
he has invested every dollar he could get 
in western lands, and now has over one thou- 
sand acres in two different tracts in Wright 
and Hancock counties, Iowa. He is a wide- 
awake, energetic business man, of progres- 
sive ideas and indomitable enterprise, and 
his success is certainlv well deserved, for he 
has had many difficulties to overcome. In 
politics he is a strong and active Republican, 
and has ser\ed as a member of the school 
board, though he cares nothing for political 
honors. Religiously he supports the Con- 
gregational church. 



\\TLLIA:M H. TAYLOR. 

William H. Taylor, the present well- 
known and efficient highwaycommissionerof 
Dwight township, and a resident of the town 
of Dwight, has through his own exertions 
attained an honorable position and marked 
•prestige among the representative men of 
his community, and with signal consistency 
it may be said that he is the architect of his 
own fortunes, for he started out in life for 
himself at the age of nine years and has 
since made his way in the world unaided. 

Mr. Tavlor was born in Lancastershire, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



329 



England, March 9, 1843, ^ son of James and 
Betty (Mills) Taylor, also natives of Lan- 
castersliire, where the father followed the 
blacksmith's trade for many years. In early 
days during the gold excitement in Califor- 
nia, he came to America and crossed the 
])lains to the Pacific slope, where he spent 
two years, meeting with fair success in his 
mining operations. His Ijruther-in-law, 
Robert Mills, who went with him to Cali- 
fornia, died a millionaire in that state a 
couple of years ago. After returning to 
England from California Mr. Taylor brought 
his family to the United States and located 
ill Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he 
worked at his trade for the PennsyKania 
railroad many years. There he .spent the re- 
mainder of bis life, dying at the age of sev- 
enty-si.x years. His wife survived him about 
two years. They were the parents of eight 
children: Elizabeth, William, John, Rachel, 
Ellen, James. Charles and Delia, all of whom 
reached mature years and all are still living 
with the exception of James. Our subject 
is the only one living in the west, the others 
being still residents of Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. 

William H. Taylor was a mere lad on 
the emigration of the family to America. 
He attended school at Pittsburg, but at the 
age of nine years he commenced earning his 
own livelihood, and ever afterward supported 
himself. In early manhood he went to In- 
diana, and worked on a farm in De Kalb 
county for a few years. From there he went 
to Chicago, where he found employment in 
the stock yards about two years, after which 
he returned to his old home in Pennsylvania 
and remained there about a year, when he 
again went to Chicago and worked in the 
stock yards a year. In 1866 he came to 
Livingston county, Illinois, in the employ of 



a Mr. McPherson, for whom he had worked 
in Chicago, it being jiis intention to remain 
only thirty days, but he has now l)een here 
o\er thirty-three years. He continued to 
\\(irk for Mr. McPherson four years. 

On the loth of December, 1868, Mv. Tay- 
lor married Miss Lydia H'. Grub, a native of 
I'.lair county, Pennsylvania, and a daughter 
of l)a\i(l Grub, who never came west. To 
our sul)ject and his wife were born four chil- 
dren, namely: ^\'illiam J., the eldest, who is 
engaged in farming in Dwight township, 
married, first, Maggie Jenkins,who died leav- 
ing one child. Rebecca, and for his second 
wife he married Catherine Del)by ]\Iorris. 
Charles and .\nnic are both at lii;me. The 
youngest, a daughter, died in infancy. 

.A.fter his marriage Mr. Taylor rented his 
present farm in Dwight township for several 
years, and in 1873 purchased twenty acres, 
to which he later added until he now owns 
eighty acres, all now within the corporate 
limits of the town of Dwight. Formerly 
he gave considerable attention to the raising 
of stock, making a specialty of thoroughbred 
animals, and for a number of years he dealt 
in stock, selling ])rincipally to the local ship- 
pers. 

Keligiousl}- Mr. and Mrs. Taxlor are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and ])olitically he is identified with the Re- 
publican party. He was a member of the 
\illage board during the Dwight boom, and 
for the past sixteen years has most efficientlv 
and satisfactorily served as road commis- 
sioner of Dwight township. With one ex- 
ception he has Imilt all the bridges in the 
township, and has made many other improve- 
ments along that line. He is public-spirited 
and progressive, and takes an active part in 
all enterprises calculated to prove of public 
benefit. 



330 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



THOMAS HUGHES. 

Tliomas Hughes, now living a retired life 
in Dwight, Illinois, is a man whose success- 
ful struggle with adverse circumstances 
shows what can he done by industry and 
economy, especially if a sensible wife sec- 
onds his efforts to secure a home and compe- 
tence. Born of poor parents, he was obliged 
to make his way in life without any of the 
aids which are usually considered essential 
to success. 

Air. Hughes was born in county ]Mayo, 
Ireland, in 1841, a son of Thomas and Mary 
(Dowd) Hughes, who spent their entire 
lives in that county, the father being em- 
ployed as a herder on a large estate. Our 
subject left home at the age of thirteen years 
and came to the United States with his uncle, 
James Hays, who was mate on a sailing ves- 
■ sel. He landed in New York and from there 
went to Long Island, where he found em- 
ployment with a farmer and market gardener 
near Flushing. His employer was a Mr. 
Bayton, a Pennsylvanian by birth, and with 
him Mr. Hughes remained until he attained 
his majority, receiving little more than his 
board and clothes for his seven years' labor. 
At the age of twenty-one he went to Xew 
York City, where he worked as a laborer 
for two years, and in 1864 he came to Chi- 
cago, where the following two years were 
passed, during which time he assisted in lay- 
ing the pipes for the city water works. He 
next found employment at the docks unload- 
ing vessels, and followed that occupation for 
five years. 

On the 25th of December, 1868, in Chi- 
cago, Mr. Hughes married Miss Margaret 
Higgins, a daughter of Francis and Mary 
( Brady) Higgins. To them have been born 
seven children, namelv : Francis, now an elec- 



trician of Seattle, Washington; John H., who 
married Julia Dunn and lives on the home 
farm in this county; Nellie M., a successful 
and popular teacher of Livingston and 
Grundy counties ; Emma, who is clerking in 
the store of Gordon Brothers of Dwight; 
Julia, a graduate of the Dwight high school, 
and now a successful teacher; and two who 
died in infancy. 

In the fall of 1869, Mr. and Mrs. Hughes 
came to Dwight, where her father had lo- 
cated some four years previous. Here, in 
partnership with his brother-in-law, our sub- 
ject engaged in farming for two years, and 
then rented one hundred and sixty acres of 
land from F. O. Caldwell in Round Grove 
township, operating that place nine years. 
In 1 87 1 he made his first purchase of land, 
consisting of one hundred and sixty acres 
on the northeast quarter of section 23, Round 
Grove township, which was ail raw land, en- 
tirely unimproved. Here he erected an 
humble home, sixteen by twenty-four feet, 
with a kitchen twenty by fourteen foet. He 
planted fifty acres of flax and broke all but 
six acres of his land the first year. During 
the ten years he resided thereon he placed 
the land under a high state of cultivation, 
and in connection with general farming en- 
gaged in stock raising, feeding usually from 
one to two hundred head of hogs. In Feb- 
ruary, 1889, he bought a tract of thirty-six 
acres of land just east of Dwight, and located 
there in order that his children mieht have 
better educational advantages. He lived there 
two years, cultivating his little farm, and in 
1889 bought one acre of land in the village, 
upon which he erected his present beautiful 
home at a cost of five thousand dollars. It 
is one of the most elegant residences in the 
citv. He has added to his landed possessions 
from time to time and now has three bun- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



331 



dred and sixty acres of valued and well-im- 
proved land. He Ts one- of the successful 
citizens of the county and deserves much 
creflit for what he has accomplished. Look- 
ing hack tlirough the vista of the past we see 
a friendless boy who came to the New World 
in search of home and fortune, at present we 
see his ambitious dream realized, and ct)uld 
the \eil of the future 1>© lifted we wnuld 
tliiubtlcss see an honored old age crowned 
with respect and veneration which is ac- 
cortled a well-si)ent life. In pnlitics ho is 
independent, and in religious belief is a 
Catholic. 



WILLI A.\l L. (Jl'lX.X. 

William L. Uuinn is one of the prosper- 
ous citizens of Strawn, who has laid aside 
all business cares and is now living a retired 
life. Success has attended his well-directed 
effiorts and he is ot-day in possession of a 
comfortable competence which enables him 
to spend his declining years in ease and re- 
tirement from active labor. 

Mr. Quinn was born in Ireland in 1842, 
and is a son of Charles and Unity (Lyncli) 
Quinn. also natives of that country, born in 
county Tyrone. The father, who was a 
farmer by occupation, died there at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety- four years. The 
mother had died at the age of twenty-four 
years, and for his second wife he married 
Jane Campljell, who is still living in Ireland 
at the age of sevent)'-five. By the first union 
there were three children, of whom our sub- 
ject is the second in order of birth and the 
only survivor. James died at the age of 
twenty-four years, and one unnamed died in 
infancy. Of the twelve children born of the 
second marriage, seven came to the United 



States, three locating in Living.ston county, 
Illinois, tho otjiers in i.os Angeles, Califor- 
nia. Michael crossed the Atlantic in 1X69, 
and after six years spent in Ottawa, Illinois, 
took up his residence in Livingston county, 
w here he at first operated one of our subject's 
farms and thon purchased three hundred and 
twenty acres of land on sections 5 and 6. Ger- 
nian\ille townshii). He is an industrious and 
prosperous farmer, and the father of six chil- 
dren. Alexandor came to America in 1874, 
and also settled in Ottawa, Illinois, where 
he worked for E. V. Griggs one year. Hj 
then settled on a farm on sections 7 and 8, 
Germanville township, owned by our sub- 
ject, and there he continues to make his 
home. He owns eightv acres of land on sec- 
tion 8. He is married and has six children, 
four sons and two daughters. 

The subject of this review was reared 
and educated in his native land, and in i860, 
at the age of eighteen years, came to .Amer- 
ica. For twenty-three years he was in the 
employof Andrew Lynch, a general merchant 
of Ottawa, Illinois, and at the end of that 
time, in 1883, came to Strawn, He worked 
on the farm with his brother Michael for one 
year, but since that time has lived a retired 
life in the village. In 1874, while still a res- 
ident of Ottawa, he purchased three hundred 
and twenty acres of land on sections 5 and 6, 
Germanville township, which at that time 
was all raw land and which was operated by 
his brothers. He made all of the improve- 
ments upon the place, including the erection 
of a commodious and pleasant residence in 
1879, which at that time was one of the best 
in the county, and he also built a large barn 
and laid over fifty thousand tiles. In due 
time the land was all placed under a high 
state of cultivation. In 1880 Mr. Quinn 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of land 



332 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



on sections 7 and 8, the same township, and 
also improved that place with the assistance 
of his brothers. Besides this property he 
has sixty-three acres on section 7, German- 
ville township, purchased by him in 1893, 
and now leased to a tenant, and one hundred 
and sixty acres of fine pasture land at Em- 
poria, Lyon county, Kansas, purchased in 
1 88 1. The same year he bought a house in 
Strawn, which he has re^nodeled and made 
one of the best in the village. It is a beau- 
tiful place, surrounded by a large lawn, and 
neat and tastefully furnished. For about 
nine months Mr. Ouinn clerked in the hard- 
■\vare and grocery store of Joseph Kuntz, in 
Strawn, but with that exception has lived 
retired during his residence here. 

In Chicago, Illinois, February 20, 1884, 
Mr. Ouinn married Miss Bridget Conlin, a 
native of Ireland, who came to this country 
in 1865. Her mother died in Ireland, after 
which her father emigrated to America and 
spent his last days in retirement from active 
labor in La Salle, Illinois, where he died at 
the age of eighty years in 1879. He had 
followed farming in his native land. 

Although Mr. Ouinn has been a resident 
of Livingston county only seventeen years, 
he has by the improvements of his property 
here been identified with its development for 
many years. As a Democrat he takes an 
active interest in political affairs, and gives 
his support to those enterprises which tend 
to advance the interest of his adopted coun- 
try. He has served as trustee of the village 
of Strawn for fourteen years, and village 
treasurer nine years, and his official duties 
were always most faithfully and conscien- 
tiously discharged. Religiously both he and 
his wife are devout members of the Roman 
Catholic church, and are highly respecte-d 
and esteemed bv all who know them. 



WALSH BROTHERS. 

\\'alsh Brothers, consisting of L. F. and 
T. AI. Walsh, are the leading merchants of 
Campus, Illinois, carrying a large and well 
selected stock of general merchandise, furni- 
ture, hardware, agricultural implements, car- 
riages, wagons, coal, lumber, lime, cement, 
and all kinds of building materials. They 
also do a large undertaking business, keep- 
ing a hearse and full equipments for the 
same. In size and quality of stock and char- 
actor of the building, their department store 
would grace a much larger town, it being 
something not often found in a place the size 
of Campus, though Campus cannot be 
judged by the average Illinois village of 
three hundred population, possessing as it 
does a standpipe and good water works; a 
church and Sisters' school, both fine brick 
structures ; and numerous elegant residences. 
The people are enterprising and progressive 
and give to the place an air of thrift. 
Walsh Brothers have an elegant and com- 
modious two-story brick beuilding, fifty by 
eighty feet, with a basement, which was 
erected by them in 1897 to take the place of 
the old frame building recently destroyed by 
fire. Forming a partnership, they pur- 
chased the business of J. J. Foltz & Son, in 
1 89 1, and continued business at the old stand 
until it was reduced to ashes. Besides their 
store building they have another large build- 
ing in which seasoned lumber is kept. They 
do an extensive business as contractors and 
builders, and have erected many of the 
buildings in Campus and vicinity, including 
nearly all those in the new mining town of 
Cardiff, where in the spring of 1900 they put 
up a large store, which will be conducted as 
a branch store of the one at Campus, and be 
in charge of J. H. Walsh, another brother. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



333 



Thomas J\I. \\'alsli, the junior member 
of the firm of Walsh Brothers, is a native of 
tliis county, born in Broughton township, , 
February 15, 1866, and is a son of Patrick 
and Ann (Smith) Walsh, both natives of 
Ireland. The father emigrated to America 
in 1849, 'i'ltl six years later took up his res- 
idence in Livingston county, Illinois, being 
one of its early settlers and successful farm- 
ers. He is now living a retired life in Cam- 
pus. In his family are nine children, name- 
ly: John P., a resident of Chicago; L. F., 
the senior member of the firm of Walsh 
Brothers; Kate E., at home; Thomas M., 
the junior member of the firm ; Mathew, who 
is in the employ of his brothers; James H., 
who has charge of the branch store in Car- 
diff; Mary A., wife of William Mortison of 
Chicago; George C, who is with his broth- 
ers, and Blandina, bookkeeper for her 
brothers. 

On the home farm Thomas M. Walsh 
grew to manhood, his early education being 
obtained in the common schools and the high 
sdiool of Dwight. Subsetpiently he took a 
literary course at St. Viature's College, and 
a commercial course at Dixon College, from 
which he was graduated in 1890. The fol- 
lowing year he formed a partnership with 
his brother L. F., as previously stated, and 
has since successfully engaged in active busi- 
ness at Campus. Fraternally he affiliates 
with Campus Camp, No. 2619, M. W^ A., 
and politically is identified with the Repub- 
lican party. He has served as postmaster of 
Campus since 1897; has filled the office of 
justice of the peace since 1892, and has been 
a member of the board of education for tho 
past six years. As a business man he is 
wide-awake, progressive and energetic, and 
carries forward to successful completion 
whatever he undertakes, while as a citizen he 



has promptly and faithfully discharged every 
duty that has devolved upon him. On the 
9th of February, 1892, he married Miss Mag- 
gie Steger, who was born and reared in 
Round (Jroxe township, this county, a daugh- 
ter of Christian and Louise Steger. By this 
union were born three children, namely : 
Francis Herbert, Clyde A., and Philomean, 
who died at the age of seven years. 

]-. !•". Walsh, the senior member of the 
firm of Walsh Brothers, is also an enterpris- 
ing business man of known reliability. He 
was born March 18, i860, was reared on the 
home farm and attended in the local schools, 
completing his education, however, by a 
general course at the Northern Indiana Nor- 
mal School at Valjiaraiso, Indiana. He was 
married, November 2-, 1896, to Miss Lena 
Flynn, a daughter of Patrick Fl\nn, and to 
them have been burn three chiklrcn, \'iola, 
Leo and Bernice. 



JAMES P. GOURLEY. 

James P. Gourley, a representative 
farmer and highly esteeme-d citizen of Esmen 
township, residing on section 17, was born 
in Harrison county. West Virginia, October 
8, i860. His father, Alfred Gourley, was 
born and reared in the Old Dominion, and 
when a young man went to West \'irginia, 
locating in Harrison county, where he mar- 
ried Rebecca Jane Farris, a native of that 
state. There the father continued to carry 
on farming for some years, but in 1865 
moved to Livingston county, Illinois, where 
two of his brothers had previously located. 
He first came to the county in 1855. but soon 
returned to \\'est \"irginia and did not locate 
permanently here luitil ten years later, when 



334 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he purcliased land in Amity township. He 
prospered in his new home, being a thorough 
farmer and good business man. and became 
the possessor of a vahiable farm of four hun- 
dred and forty acres. Upon that place he 
continued to make his home throughout life, 
dying there May 30, 1898. His wife sur- 
vives him, and continues to reside on the old 
homestead with her son Charley. 

In Amity township James P. Gourley 
grew to manhood, and was educated in the 
country schools near his home. He as- 
sisted his father in the operations of the farm 
until nineteen years of age, and then worked 
on the farm of a cousin for two years. On 
the 24th of December, 1882, in Livingston 
county, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Ida Buren, who was born and reared in 
Grundy county, Illinois, and they have be- 
come the parents of seven children, namely : 
Ray, Fay, Clarence, Earl, Flavins, Florence 
and Edith. All are living with the excep- 
tion of Fay, who died at the age of eight 
years, and the sons aid their father in carry- 
ing on the farm. 

After his marriage Mr. Gourley located 
on the farm where he now resides, but after 
operating it for four years he moved to the 
Buren farm in Grundy county, in 1886, and 
lived there for the same length of time. In 
1 89 1 he returned to the farm in Esmen town- 
ship, Livingston county, on which he now re- 
sides. Here he owns sixty acres, and also 
operates an adjoining one hundred and sixty 
acre tract belonging to the Gourley heirs, 
and eighty acres more near by. He also 
rents one hundred and sixty acres of pasture 
land. He owns a valuable farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in St. Joseph county, 
Indiana, and in connection with his brother 
Charles has a piece of three hundred acres in 
LaPorte county, that state. In connection 



with farming he is engaged in stock raising, 
his specialty being hogs, but he also keeps a 
good grade of cattle, including some full- 
blooded registered Durhams. He is ac- 
counted one of the most successful farmers 
and stock men in his part of the county, and 
is numbered among its most reliable and pro- 
gressive business men. 

In politics 'Mr. Gourley is independent 
and cast his first presidential vote for Grover 
Cleveland, the Democratic nominee, his last 
for William McKinley, the Republican can- 
didate. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Cornell Camp of Modern Woodmen, and he 
is held in high regard by all with whom he 
comes in contact either in business or social 
life. 



ARTHUR MARSHALL. 

Arthur Marshall, a prominent and rep- 
resentative farmer of Livingston county, was 
born near Sandy Hill, Washington county. 
New York, March 16, 1834. and died in 
Dwight, May 30, 1899. As his parents died 
when he \\'as quite small, he remembered 
nothing of his mother and but little of his 
father. His early life was spent in western 
New York and Pennsylvania, and in 1857 
he came to Illinois, locating first in Bureau 
county, but in March of the following year 
he drove across the country to Livingston 
county, where he continued to make his.home 
until his death. He purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Union township, 
to the cultivation and improvement of which 
he devoted his energies until 1898, and in 
his farming operations was quite successful. 
He was a lover of good stock, especially 
horses, and he fed cattle and hogs exten- 
sively. In politics he was a strong Repub- 
lican, verv radical in his views, but would 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



335 



never accept any public office whato/er. say- 
ing that lie would not be president if lie was 
capable and the position was offered him. 
Until late in life he was a nieniljcr nt tlio 
Presbyterian church, but in 1895, with his 
wife, he united with the Congregational 
church of Dwight. As in other affairs he 
never would accept office, though ho took an 
active interest in church and Supnday school 
work and was an efficient and and able leader 
in the Sunday school, lie was noted for his 
kind and obliging disposition anil was alw ays 
willing to assist those in neo;l even at an in- 
convenience to himself. Surely the life rec- 
ord of such a man is wurtli)- of perpetuation 
anil will be read with interest by his many 
frienils and aciiuaintances throughout the 
County. 

Mr. Marshall was three times marrieil, 
first on the 24th of January, 1861, to Miss 
Mary Thompson, a nati\e of Guernsey 
count}'. Ohio, and a daughter of Mitchell and 
lane riiompsdu. At an early age she and 
her threo brothers were left motherless. 
She came to Livingston county to keep house 
fur Iwi) of them, William and Hugh, and 
the other, Jefferson, located here later. The 
first two were soldiers of the civil war, and 
after their return from the war lived in 
Union township, this county, but Hugh is 
now a resident of Pontiac, while Jefferson 
resides in Miles City, Montana. Mr. Mar- 
shall made the acquaintance of his wife while- 
she was keeping house for her brothers, but 
she removeil to her father's hoiiie to be mar- 
ried, and came as a bride to this county the 
second time. She died June 12, i86g, leav- 
ing three children: (i) William E., born 
October 8, 1861, died June 5, 1895. (2) 
Mary J., born January 23. 1864, is a gradu- 
ate of the Dwight schools, and for some time 
was a teachor of Livingston countv. She 



had charge of an Indian agency school in the 
west for a time, and was also connected with 
the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas, 
but is now teaching in Glendive, ]\Iontana. 
(3) .\nna L., burn October 14. 1866, is the 
wift.. of James W. McKinzic, of Glendive, 
Montana. 

Mr. Marshall was again married, March 
7, 187 1, his second union being with Margaret 
Ci. George, who was born in Belmont county, 
Oliiii. April 9, 1831, a daughter of John and 
.\nn (Cross) George, the former a native 
of Ireland, the latter uf Maryland. Being 
loft an orphan, her father came to America 
at the age of nine years and grew to man- 
hood in Ohio. He owned and operated a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Dwight township, this coijnty, where he 
made his home until 1864, and then moved 
to Dwight, where his death occurred in 1872. 
He was a liljeral supjjorter and active worker 
in the Presbyterian church, in which he 
ser\ed as elder for many years. In bis fam- 
ily were twoKe children, ten of whom grew 
to maturity, and four are still living, namely; 
Sarah A., wiilow of Benjamin Ogg, and a 
resident of Parker, Alissouri; James C, a 
retired farmer of Washington, Kansas; Liz- 
zie M., the third wife of our subject, and 
Rebecca, widow of Henry McDonald, of Al- 
gona. low a. Those deceased are as follows : 
Wm. C, born October 29, 1826, died No- 
vember 29, 1826; Mary, born May 17, 1842, 
died the same day ; Leathy, born October 5, 
1835, married Jesse Cowgill, and died May 
2^, 1862, leaving two children, John Mc- 
Daniel and Margaret A. ; Priscilla, born Oc- 
tober 12, 1829, married John Cowgill, of 
tiuernsey, Ohio, where she die-d in 1868, 
leaving si.x children ; John C, born October 
19, 1833, served three years in the Union 
army during the civil war, and made his 



336 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



home in Dwight township, this county, where 
he died September 17, 1899; Louisa, born 
June 15, 1837, died unmarried at the age 
of twenty-nine years and thirteen days ; and 
Benjamin Cross, born May 22, 1839, married 
Olhe Burr, and died in Nevada, lUinois, in 
1866, leaving two children, John and Mary. 
The father of these children was born De- 
cember 25, 1796, and died August 12, 1877, 
while the mother was born May 25, 1804, 
and died May 25, 1885. Mrs. Margaret C. 
Marshall, the second wife of our subject, died 
January 10, 1887, leaving one daughter, 
Minnie 2\I., now the wife of George Crandell, 
residing on the old homestead in Union town- 
ship, I hey had three children, but Olive, 
born February 25, 1895, died April 27, 1897. 
Those living are Mary M and John M. 

On the 29th of October, 1888, Mr. Mav- 
shall married Lizzie ^I, Brown, a sister of 
his second wife, who was an invalid for sev- 
eral years prior to her death, and Lizzie had 
made her home with them for two years. 
She was Ixirn October 2t,, 1844, and was 
first married ^Nlay 7, 1868, to Edgar D. 
Brown, by whom she had four children, 
namely: Edgar C, a resident of Schoolcraft, 
Michigan; Frank, a soldier in Porto Rico; 
and Eleanora M., who is attending school in 
Peoria, Illinois. By her second marriage, 
Mrs. Marshall has one child, George A,, born 
December 14, 1889, She has [made her 
home in Dwight since 1898, and is highly 
respected and esteemed by all who know her. 



PETER G, XELLIS. 

Peter G. Nellis, who for many years was 
auditor of the Chicago & Alton Railroad, 
but is now practically living a retired life in 



Pontiac,. Illinois, is a man whose worth and 
ability have gained him success, honor and 
public confidence. He enjo\s the well- 
earned distinction of being what the world 
calls a "self-made man," and an analyzation 
of his character re\-eals the fact that enter- 
prise, well-directed eft'ort and honorable 
dealing have been the essential features of 
his prosperity. 

Mr. Xellis was born in Fort Plain, Xew 
York, April 11, 1825, a son of Gerritt and 
^Madeline (Ehle) Nellis. both natives of 
Palatine Bridge, New York, His paternal 
great-grandfather was a bishop of the Lu- 
theran church, and a resident of Schenec- 
tady, New York. The maternal grantl- 
father, Peter Ehle, was descended from 
German stock and was a farmer by C)ccupa- 
tion. When a x'oung man the father of our 
subject moved to Fort Plain, of which place 
he became a well-known and prominent 
farmer. In religious belief both he and his 
wife were Lutherans, He died at Fovt 
Plain, while his wife, who was born in 1800. 
died December 22. 1889. 

Of the three children liorn to this worthy 
couple our subject is the oldest. He at- 
tended the common schools of his native 
town and completed his education by an 
academic course. He remained on the home 
farm until he attained his majority and about 
1848 came west by boat from Buft'alo to 
Detroit, by rail to Kalamazoo, then the west- 
ern terminus of the Michigan Central Rail- 
road, and from there crossed the lake to 
Chicago, After spending a short time in 
that city, he made a prospecting tour through 
northern Illinois and Wisconsin, and finally 
located in Lockport, Illinois, where he en- 
gaged in merchandising, being one of the 
first merchants of that place, which at that 
time was a competitor of Joliet, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



337 



Mr. Xellis spent two years in Lnckix^rt, 
and tbo'e l:e was n:arriecl, Feliruary ji. 1850, 
to Miss Louise Jennison. wlio was lioni anil 
reared in Dundee. Scotland, and is a daugh- 
ter of Captain Robert and Susan (Clarke) 
Jennison. the former a nativo of Weymouth. 
England, the latter of Dundee. Scotland, 
here the family made their home until 
coming to the United States in 1846. at 
which time the father was a retired officer 
of the Royal navy. They located in Chi- 
cago, but later removed to Lockport. where 
Captain Jennison owned a section of land. 
though he never acti\ely engaged in its 
operation. He spent his last days in Os- 
wego. Illinois, where his wife also ilied. 
Mr. and Mrs. Xellis have thri..; children : 
Gerritt John, a resident of Chicago: Rufus 
L.. of Denver; and Mrs. Loui.se Slocum, of 
I'ontiac. 

After his marriage Mr. Xellis disposed of 
I'lis business in Lockport and accepted the po- 
sition of paymaster for the Illinois Central 
Railroad, then being built at Cairo. The 
rails were brought from England, and from 
Xew Orleans were towo:l up the Mississippi 
river on flatlioats. He handled large sums 
of money for the road at a time when banks 
and checks were fow and robbers plenty. 
He remained with the company during the 
entire construction of the road, General Mc- 
Clellan being chief engineer and later vice- 
president. After its completion Mr. Xellis 
served as the first agent at Vandalia. and 
later was trans f«;rred to LaSalle, being three 
years at each place. He was next ajjpointed 
traveling auditor for the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad with home and headtjuarters at 
Chicago, receiving his appointment when 
Roswell B. Mason was president and general 
manager of the road, and J. C. McMullen 
general superintendent. He remained with 



the company thirty-five years, traveling the 
whole e.xtent of the road, which in extent of 
time is un])aralleled by any case in railroad 
h;story. Me was also considered one of the 
finest accountants in the United States, and 
most accountably filled the jjosition of auditor 
until the retirement of T. B. Blackstone. the 
pre.sident, in 1900, though he is still with the 
road in a local way. For years he has made 
his home in Pontiac. where, in 1890. he 
erected the present residence where he now 
lives. He is widely and favorably known 
throughout the state and has a host of warm 
friends in his adopted city. 



•DEXJ.\.MIX BARICKM.\X. 

Benjamin Barickman, who resides on 
section 30. Xewton township, is numbered 
among the pioneers of 1832, the date of his 
arrival being at the time of the celebrated 
Black Hawk war. He was a lad of eight 
years at the time, and has a vivid recollec- 
tion of the stirring events of that day. He 
is a native of Atlanis county, Ohio, born De- 
cember n, 1824, and is the son of Daniel 
and Mary ( Pitchenger ) Barickman. both of 
whom were natives of Maryland, where they 
were united in marriage, and which was 
their home until their removal to Ohio in 
an early day. They made their home in 
Adams county, that state, until 1832. when 
they came to Illinois, making the journey 
in a large "prairie schooner" drawn by oxen. 
On their arrival they located on what is now 
section 30, Xewton township, the farm yet 
being in the jxissession of our subject. 

Securing his location, Daniel Barickman 
set about the erection of his house, the typi- 
cal log ca1)in so well remembered bv the 



338 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



older resivlonts of the county. At that time 
there were but few persons residing in what 
is now Livingston county, but prairie wolves, 
deer and other wild game were in abundance. 
Our subject has counted as many as fifty 
deer in one drove in the early day, and it was 
many years before they were all extinct in 
this section of the country. Prairie chick- 
ens were so numerous they at tmies destroyed 
tlie growing corn. 

Daniel Barickman was a son of Daniel 
Barickman, a native of Germany, wIki came 
to this country with his wife early in their 
married life, locating in Maryland, which re- 
mained their home during the romainder of 
their lives. Daniel and Mavy Barickman 
were the parents of nine children. Bartley, 
James, Prudence, Daniel, Harriot, Benja- 
min, Jacob, Mary Ann and Upton. Of 
these, four are yot living. Prudence, the 
widow of Wesley Bishop, is living in Wel)- 
ster Citv, Iowa. Daniel is living a retired 
life in the city of Streator, LaSalle county. 
Harriet is the wife of Preston Bishop and 
they make their home in Towanda, Illinois. 
The death of the father occurred when he 
was seventy-four years old, and the mother 
when she was seventy-one years old. In 
politics, he was originally a Whig, but later 
a Republican, and in political affairs he 
always manifested a commendable interest. 

The first purchase of land by Daniel 
Barickman was of two hundred and forty 
acres on which he erected his cabin and at 
once commenced to improve. Xot a fur- 
row had I)eon turned, and there was no sign 
of civilization. Indian wigwams were to be 
seen in the timber, and there was nothing 
but the Indian trail and the path made bv 
the deer as they came out of the timber. 
Commencing the impro\ement of the place, 
he soon had (|uite a large tract under culti- 



vation, and in due time he added to his 
original purchase and became a well-to-do 
farmer. He continued to reside on his 
original farm until his death. 

The primary education of our subject 
began in the common schools of his native 
state, and soon after the arrival of the fam- 
ily in Livingston county his father employed 
a man named Button to teach school in an 
out-house on his place, and to that school 
he went, and later in a log school house 
erected aljout two miles from their home. 
There were yet no roads located and the 
children went through the timber to the 
school. In winter time it was \'ery hard to 
make their way through the snow, which 
sometimes was very deep. An education, 
however, obtained under such circumstan- 
ces is apt to be appreciated. 

The early life of our subject was one of 
hardship. The farm must be improved, 
and e\ery member of the family must do 
liis part. With his parents he remained, 
assisting in the development of the place 
until he was about twenty-two years of age, 
when he was united in marriage with iMiss 
iMary A. Latham, a native of Connecticut, 
and daughter of Lyman S. Latham, one of 
the early settlers of the county, who came 
from the Xntmeg state about 1845. locating 
in what is now Reading township. By this 
union eight children were born, of whom 
three — Augusta, Franklin and Benjamin — 
died in childhood. The living are : Daniel, 
a farmer of Xewtown township; Prudence, 
wife of Joseph Coe, living in Chicago; Car- 
rie, wife of Cephas Coe, living in Reading 
township : Charles M., county judge of Liv- 
ingston county, residing in Pontiac; and 
Willis H., who is married and living on and 
operating the home farm. 

After his marriage i\Ir. Barickman con- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



339 



tiiuied to reside on tlie home place, which he 
managed for his father for some years, and 
of whicii he later hecame the owner. To the 
original farm he added eighty acres, whicli 
he lias since deeded to one of his sons. As a 
farmer he ranked among the best in the conn- 
ty, and was fairly successfnl. He continued 
to actively engage in the management of tlie 
farm until 1898. since which time he has 
been living a retired life. 

For many years Mr. Barickman has been 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and for the greater part of the time he 
served his church as a member of the official 
board. He has always taken an active in- 
terest in church work, and is a strong be- 
liever in the teachings of the lowly Xaza- 
rene. In politics he was originally a Whig, 
with which party he was identified until its 
dissolution, since which time he has been an 
ardent Republican. He was never an office- 
seeker, but believed in every man doing his 
duty, politically, in the advocacy of the prin- 
ciples and the proper support of his party. 

For sixty-eight years Mr. Barickman 
has been a citizen of Livingston county. As 
already stated, when he came here the coun- 
try was almost an unbroken wilderness. 
Wolves, deer and wild game of all kinds 
was in abundance. One could scarcely 
look out from the door without seeing wolves 
or deer. His brother was a great hunter. 
and was considered the best shot on the river. 
Our subject was a hunter of no mean ability, 
and has in his time killed many deer in the 
vicinity of his home. He remembers on 
one occasion that a party of hunters were out 
with their hounds on a deer hunt, and one of 
the number shot a buck, which plunged into 
the river. The dogs were sent in after him, 
but the deer, fighting for his life, almost 
drowned the dogs before an end was put to 



his e.xistence. Many anecdotes and incidents 
of pioneer life are related by Mr. Barick- 
man, to the wonder and amusement of the 
younger generation. But in the almost 
three-score years and ten that he has lived in 
this county he has witnessed many changes 
indeed. He has seen the old plow, with its 
wooden mold-board, give place to the mod- 
ern implement of steel, the sickle and the 
tlail superseded by the reaper and the steam 
thresher; the log cabin replaced by the 
stately farm house with all the comforts of 
the nineteenth century. He has seen the 
coming of the 'railroad, the telegraph and 
the telephone. He has seen town and cities 
spring up, and churches and school houses 
find a place on almost every hillside, and in 
every hamlet. Aladdin, with his lamp, 
could never unfcild greater wonders than he 
has witnessed since becoming a citizen of 
Livingston, one of the best and most pros- 
perous of the counties in Illinois. In the im- 
provements that have here been made he has 
borne his part, and he has a right to the 
years of rest which it is hoped that he may 
be able to enjoy. 



JOSEPH O. ALBRECHT. 

Josei)h O. Albrecht, one of the foremost 
men of Waldo township, Livingston county, 
is a native of Illinois, born in Princeton. Bu- 
reau county, December IQ. 1859, and is a 
sr)n of John and .\nnie ((lacho) Albrecht, 
natives of Germany. In 1838. at the age of 
four years, John Albrecht was brought to 
this country by his parents, who settled in 
Bureau county, Illinois. In the early days 
of Chicago, the grandfather, Jacob Albrecht, 
hauled his wheat to that citv from Bureau 



340 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county in a wagon which he hewed out of 
logs. Throughout Hfe he followed farming, 
and at one time also owned and operated a 
brewery at Princeton. He died in 1877. 
In his family were eight children, five sons 
and three daughters, of whom two, Christo- 
pher and J(.)hn Albrecht, are prosperous 
farmers li\ing at Tiskilwa, Bureau county. 

The father of our subject followed farm- 
ing in Bureau county until 1865, when he 
came to Livingston county and bought the 
west half of section 3, Waldo township, for 
which he paid ten dollars per acre. Here 
he prospered, and at the time of his death 
owned seventeen hundred and twenty acres 
of land besides several business blocks in 
Flanagan. He died February 12, 1900, at the 
the age of sixty-six years, two months 
and twent\--two days. He was well 
known and highly respected, and had 
many friends throughout this section 
of the state. O n the 8th of March, 
1859, he married Anna Gacho, and 
to them were born the following children : 
Joseph O., our subject; August, who was 
born June 16, 1861, and died February 16, 
1892; John, who was born Mav 12, 1863, 
and died February 21, 1885; Christopher, 
v.ho was born December 24, 1865, antl died 
October 20. 1890; Jacob, who was born 
February 20, 1869, and died April 16, 
1889; and Benjamin, who was born Novem- 
ber 23, 1 87 1, and now resides in W'aklo 
township, Livingston county. The mother 
of these children departed this life Decem- 
ber 2^. 1873, and on the 22d of November, 
1874, the father married Barbara Nafciger, 
also a native of Germanv. by wlmm he had 
eight children, whose names and dates of 
l)irth are as follows : Magdaline, Septem- 
lier 18, 187;; Peter, February 17, 1877: 
Annie, March 5, 1879; Samuel, August 'i. 



1883; Lydia, \\\y 5, 1886: William, Septem- 
ber 12, 1888; and Daniel, February 16, 1894. 
The oldest daughter is now the wife of Peter 
Good, of Waldo township. 

The early education of Joseph O. Al- 
brecht was acquired in the public schools near 
his bo}-h(i(id home, and under the aljle direc- 
tion of his father he soon acquired an ex- 
cellent knowledge of e\'ery department of 
farm w(.>rk. He has made agriculture his 
life occupation, and now owns and operates 
a quarter-section of land on section 9, Waldo 
township, and also has eighty-two acres on 
section 2, besides one hundred and sixty 
acres in Iowa. He is a wide-awake, pvo- 
gressi\e farmer, of good business abilitv and 
sound iudpment, and is meeting with re- 
markalile success in life. 

On the loth of February, 1884, Mr. Al- 
brecht was united in marriage with ISIiss 
Lizzie, daughter of Christopher and Mary 
(IngokD Ringenberg. of Tiskilwa, Bureau 
county, and they now have one child, John 
W., born December i, 1885. Mr. Albrecht 
has held several local offices and takes a keen 
interest in the welfare of his township and 
countv. 



JAMES E. GRAHAM. 

James E. Graham, who is now living a 
retired life in the village of Long Point, and 
is efficiently serving as assessor of his town- 
ship, has made his home in Livingston 
county for over a third of a century, having 
come here from near \\'enona. La Salle 
county, in 1865. He was born at Port 
William, Clinton county, Ohio, in 1842, a 
son of Thomas B. and Elizabeth (Ellis) 
Graham, also natives of Ohio. The father 
was of Scotch ancestrv, the mother of Ger- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



341 



man and English tiescent. W'lien a t-oung 
man Tliomas B. Graham learned the trade 
of a millwright and cabinet-maker, which he 
I'ollowed throughout life, dying in Ohio in 
1884. He left four children who reached 
years of maturity, namely : Lydia, who 
married Thomas Greer and died in Ohio 
about 1855: John W"., an attorney and jus- 
tice of the peace of Harrisonville, Cass 
county, Missouri; Asa A., an attorney and 
real estate dealer of Topeka, Kansas; and 
James E., the subject of this sketch. After 
the death i>f the father, the mother married 
Absalom Kinsey, by whom she had five chil- 
dren, but only two are now living: Isaac 
\\'.. a farmer of Long Point township, Liv- 
ingston county; antl Malinda. wife of James 
Merrill, in the emplo\- of the L'nion Tea 
Company at Champaign. In 1S54 the fam- 
ily moved to Marshall county, Illinois, and a 
year later to La Salle county, where Mr. 
Kinsey followed farming, but both he and 
his wife spent their last days in Long Point 
township, Livingston county. She was 
born June 11, 1813, and died July 19, 1894. 
James E. Graham was educated in the 
schools of La Salle county, and remained 
with his mother until he entered the L'nion 
army during the ci\il war, at the age of 
eighteen }ears. He enlisted as a private 
July I, .1861, in Company C, Forty-fourth 
Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, and remained 
with his regiment all through the war, tak- 
ing part in the battles of Pea Ridge, P'erry- 
ville, Stone River, Chickamauga and Mis- 
sionary Riilge, and in all the engagements 
of the Atlanta campaign. Although he had 
many narrow escapes, he was never wound- 
ed, and was ne\er in the hospital but for a 
single night. At the close of the war he 
was honorably discharged as commissary 
sergeant September 26, 1865. 



After being mustered out ]\Ir. Graham 
located in W'enona, Illinois, and in 1866 
came to Long Point township, Livingston 
county, where he has since made his home 
with the exception of one year. On the 
29th of November, 1868, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Emma Long, who 
was born near Danville, \'ermilion county, 
Illinois, Xoxember 30, 1843, ^ daughter of 
Reuben and Phema (Lucas) Long, natives 
of Ohio. Mr. Long was born June 18, 1813, 
and died September 29, 1885. He was of 
Irish and German and his wife of German 
and English extraction. She was born July 
5, 1816, and is still living on the home place 
near Cornell. She became a resident of 
\'ermilion county in 183 1, her husband in 
1839, and in 1852 they removed to Living- 
ston county, being among the early .settlers 
of Amity townshii). Both held membership 
in the Christian church, and has always af- 
filiated with the Democratic party. In their 
family were eleven children, eight of whom 
are still living: Emma, wife of otn- sub- 
ject; Clarissa, who is the widow of Ellis 
Kinsey and lives near Flanagan, Illinois; 
Orlean, who lives near Cornell, in Amity 
townshi]); Joseph, who lives near Long 
Point; )(ihn {twin of Joseph), who is a 
carpenter and lives with his mother near 
Cornell; Charlotte, who is a widow and also 
lives with her mother; Lucretia, wife of Les- 
lie Lawrence, living near Flanagan; and 
Samantha, wife of Charles Talbott, of Amity 
townshij). To Mr. and ]Mrs. Graham were 
born three children, of whom one died in 
infancy. Leon, born .August 30. 1872, was 
educated at Eureka College, and is engaged 
in school teaching. He married Laura 
l-'ilby, and has one son, W'i-lbur. .\rvilla 
Mae, born October 7, 1876, is the wife of 
Louis Stilson, a prosperous farmer of Han- 



342 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cock county, Iowa, and tliey liave two chil- 
dren. Gladys and Milliuni. 

After his marriage Mr. Graham took up 
his residence upon a farm in Long Point 
townsliip, and successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming until his removal to the village 
of Long Point in March, 1898, since which 
time he has practically lived a retired life. 
He pnrcliased a pleasant home, and also 
eighteen li)ts within the corporation limits. 
In politics he is a pronounced Republican, 
and has served the people faithfully and 
well as cr)nstal)le: school director for sev- 
eral years, and assessor for the past five 
years. He is a prominent member of the 
Grand Army Post. No. 784, of which he 
is chaplain, and both he and his wife are 
active members of the Christian church of 
Long Point, of which he is an elder. 



GEORGE W'HITHAM. 

George W'hitham is a prominent busi- 
ness man of Cornell, where he is now suc- 
cessfullv carrying on operations as a dealer 
in hardware, agricultural implements and 
grain. In all nf his undertakings he has 
steadilv i)n)si)ered, his excellent success l)e- 
ing but the logical result of liis careful and 
correct business methods. 

Mr. Whitham is a native of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, born near Wheeling. 
West \'irginia, Januarv 30, 1834. His 
father. Alexander B. Whitham. was born in 
Brown county. Ohio, and when a young man 
went to Washington county. Pennsylvania, 
where he married Martha J. Davis. In early 
life he folowed the shoemaker's trade, but 
later devoted his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. On first coming to Illinois, in Feb- 



ruary. 1857, he settled in Marshall county, 
and did not locate in Livingston county un- 
til 1876. Here he spent his last days on a 
farm and died October .22, 1886. 

Our subject grew to manhood in Mar- 
shall county and was educated in the Lacon 
high school. After the remo\al of the 
family to Livingston county, he aided his 
father with the farm work, and continued to 
engage in agricultural pursuits in Esmen 
township, until coming to Cornell in 1893. 
when he purchased an established hardware 
and implement business, which he has since 
carried on with marked success. Since 1895 
lie has also tlealt in grain and now ships 
large quantities from Cornell. He is one of 
the most active, enterprising and progressive 
business men in his section of the county. 

On the 1st of October, 1879. in Esmen 
townsh'p. Mr. Whitham married Miss Emma 
A. Rhodes, who was born near Lake Geneva, 
iri Walworth county, Wisconsin, her father, 
Leiand AI, Rhodes, being one of the pio- 
neers of that county, and a native of New 
York. He lironght his family to Li\-ingston 
county, this state in 1876. Mr. and Mrs. 
Whitham have five children, namely: Mil- 
ton A.. Charles E.. Mina May. Gracie and 
Carrie. Mrs. Whitham is a member of the 
Baptist church and takes an active part in 
the work of the church and Sabbath school. 
Fraternally Mr. Whitham is a member of 
the Modern Woodman Camp at the same 
place, and has serveil as clerk a number of 
years. In his political affiliations he has been 
a life-long Democrat, and has taken quite 
an. active and prominent part in local politics. 
He has filled the otifice of assessor, collector, 
township clerk and president of the village 
board. In 1895 he was elected supervisor 
and has served as such for six consecutive 
years, .\lthough he has not met with strong 




GEORGE WHITHAM. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



345 



opposition lie was re-elected by an increased 
majority at each election. Me lias most 
ably and satisfactorily represented his town- 
ship on the board, has lieen appointed a mem- 
ber of a nnmber of important committees, 
and is now chairman of the one on rules. 
His pul)lic and private life are alike above 
re])roach, and he well deserves the success 
that has come to hir.i. 



EUGEXE A. \'AHEV. 

luig'cne A. \'ahey. a piipular conductor 
on the Wabash Railroad and a prominent 
citizen of Forrest, Illinois, was born in Mt. 
Carmel, Pennsylvania. August 31, 1851. and 
is a son of Eugene and Julia ( Cosgrove) \'a- 
hey. The father was alsi > a native of that 
state and a contractor on railroad work, 
doing an extensive business. He helped in 
the construction of the Erie Railroad, Dela- 
ware, Lackawanna & Western, and Lehigh 
Valley Railroads, but during the last twenty 
years of his life lived retired from active 
business. He made his home in Pittston, 
] Pennsylvania, during the greater part of his 
life, and died there January 10, 1892, while 
his wife passed away September 15, 1882. 
Both were meinbers of St. Paul's Catholic 
church of that place, and in politics the fa- 
ther was a Democrat. 

Our subject was educated in the common 
and high schools of Pittston, and for two 
years was engaged in the grocery business 
at that place. Selling out his interest, he 
became connected with railroad work, in 
1873, as brakeman on the Wyoming divis- 
ion of the Lehigh \'alley Railroad, with 
which he was connected three years. He 
then went to Jersey City, Xew Jersey, and 



entered the employ r)f the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, and remained with them 
until March 15, 1882, making up passenger 
trains in the yards at that place. Coming 
west, Mr. Vahey entered the service of the 
^^'abash Railroad on the 27th of that month, 
as switchman at Forrest, Illinois, and six 
months later was appointed yardmaster, at 
a time when all freight stopped here. He 
served in that capacity until September, 
1888, when he went upon the road as con- 
ductor, running at first from Forrest to 
Chicago. Later he w;is assigned to the 
Streator run, which is one of the best on the 
road, as he gets home every night. In point 
of service he and Mr. Stewart are the oldest 
emi)loves of the Wabash Railroad living in 
Forrest, and have the entire confidence and 
respect of the comiiany. 

On the 25th of November, 1875, Mr. 
\'aliey was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary J. Garri.son. of Paterson, Xew Jer- 
sey, a native of that place and a daughter 
of David and Mary A. (Garrettson) Garri- 
son. The father, who was a carpenter and 
a son of Henry Garrison, spent his entire life 
in that city, and Mrs. Vahey's maternal 
grandfather, Henry Garrettson, was also an 
old resident of Paterson. Our subject and 
his wife have two children : Marguerite, and 
Charles E., a teacher at Reading, Illinois. 

Mr. Vahey owns a nice home and other 
])ro])ertv in Forrest. He has been very suc- 
cessful in business affairs, and was one of 
the promoters, incorporators and member 
of the first board of directors of the Forrest 
Building & Loan Association. Originally 
he was a Democrat in politics, but in 1896 
voted for McKinley, and still affiliates with 
the Republican party. He served as city 
clerk one term, and as alderman of Forrest 
two vears. I-"raternally he is a prominent 



346 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and influential memlier of W'aljasli Division, 
No. 260, O. R. C, of wliich he has been sec- 
retary- and treasurer, and was a representa- 
tive to the conventions held in Atlanta in 
1895 and Detroit in 1899. He has always 
taken a leading part in the affairs of his di- 
vision. Mr. Vahey is also connected with 
Forrest Lodge, No. 614, F. & A. M., the 
Chapter and Commandery at Fairbury ; and 
Olive Branch Lodge, No. 154, K. P., of 
which he has been chancellor commander 
and deputy grand chancellor of his district, 
instituting new lodges, including" the one at 
Long Point, and installing the new officers 
at each election. In all the relations of life 
he has been found true to every trust re- 
posed in him, and is justly regarded as one 
of the valued citizens of Forrest. Mr. and 
Mrs. Vahc}' are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Forrest. 



THOMAS K. BARTON. 

For a quarter of a century Thomas K. 
Barton has dwelt in Livingston county, and 
during this period has become well-to-do 
and prominent. His life has been exempla- 
ry and worthy of emulation, and unbounded 
confidence in his integrity and high stand- 
ard of honor is felt b}' the friends and neigh- 
bors who ha\-e long enjoyed his acquaint- 
ance. 

A native of Juniata county, Pennsylva- 
nia. Mr. Barton is a descendant of sterling- 
German pioneers of that state. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Ephraim Barton, was born 
in Germany, and at an early day in this 
country's history cast in his lot with our 
people. He participated in some of the In- 
dian wars, and also fought in the war of 



181 J. David B.. one of his sons, and fa- 
ther of our subject, was born in Juniata 
county about 1818, and departed this life in 
1863. at his old home in the Keystone state. 
His wife, Sarah, was a daughter of Thomas 
Knox, also of Pennsylvania, and of Irish 
extraction. 

The birth of Thomas K. Barton oc- 
curred December 15. 1844, and for twenty- 
two years he resided on his father's farm in 
Juniata county. In 1866 he determined to 
seek his fortune in the west, and, coming 
to Illinois, he found employment with farm- 
ers in La Salle county. At the end of a 
year he leased a farm, and soon afterwards 
returned to the old home, with the purpose 
of escorting his mother and younger brothers 
and sisters to the new home he had loyally 
provided for them, as the father had passed 
to his reward. Mary, the eldest sister, be- 
came the wife of George Vanata, and died 
in 1897. Nancy, the next in order of birth, 
wedded Joshua Frazer and lives in Ne- 
braska. Samuel Barton is a citizen of \'er- 
milion comity, Illinois, and Susan, the 
youngest of the family, is deceased. 

For five years subsequent to his return to 
this state Thomas K. Barton and the other 
members of the family dwelt together, the 
circle being unbroken. His home was upon 
a farm in La Salle county, and he continued 
to lease the place until 1875, when he re- 
mo\ed to another homestead, this being lo- 
cated in Long Point township, Livingston 
Cdunty. In 1883 he bought eighty acres in 
section 30, Amity township — his present 
home, and here he found a great task be- 
fore him, for the improvements were very 
poor, a log cabin and a few acres of broken 
prairie constituting them. With character- 
istic energy he commenced the work of mak- 
inp- this a model farm, draining low lands 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



347 



liy means of tiling, building fences, a large, 
convenient house and good barns and other 
necessary buildings. He also expended 
some time and means in planting fruit and 
shade trees, and at length he bought forty 
acres of adjoining property, thus increas- 
ing his possessions to one hundred and 
twenty acres. 

In all of his cares and joys. Mr. Barton 
has been cheered and aided by his devoted 
wife, formerly Miss Sarah E. Smith. They 
were married in La Salle county, February 
14. 1872, and have been numbered among 
the upright, worthy inhabitants of this state 
since they reached maturity. Mrs. Bar- 
ton was born in Juniata county, Pennsylva- 
nia, and was reared and educated there. Of 
the five children born to our subject and 
wife four are living, their little Jesse having 
died when young. The eldest. Frank D., is 
married and resides in Cornell, where he is 
engaged in mercantile pursuits. Laura, 
who received an excellent education, com- 
pleting her studies in the Dixon (Illinois) 
College, is one of the successful teachers of 
this county. Leroy, an enterprising young 
man. is at home, assisting in the manage- 
ment of the farm. Frederick Carl, the 
youngest, also is with his parents. 

The first presidential ballot of our sub- 
ect was cast for Lincoln in 1864. In na- 
tional affairs, he supports Democratic nom- 
inees, while in local elections he is inde- 
pendent of party lines. For fifteen years 
he served as a member of the school Iward, 
thus evincing the genuine interest which he 
feels in the vital matter of educating the 
young. He had the honor of being presi- 
dent of the board during the greater share 
of that period, and to his heartfelt concern 
in the subject much of the prosijerity of our 
school system may be attributed. With his 



estimable wife he holds membership in the 
Methodist Protestant church. Fraternally 
he is identified with the Cornell Lodge of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, and is a 
trustee of the lodge building. 



CilBSOX B. BROWXSOX. 

(iibson B. Brownson. the present super- 
visor of Indian Grove township, in which 
the city of Fairburg is located, was for 
many years one of the leading contractors 
and builders of that place, and many notable 
examples of his skill are to be seen in this 
section of the county, but he is now living 
a retired life. Thoroughly reliable in all 
things, the (|uality of his work is a convinc- 
ing test of his own personal worth and the 
same admirable trait is shown in his con- 
scientious discharge of the duties of different 
]K)sitions of trust and resixinsibility to which 
he has been chosen in jjolitical life. 

Mr. Brownson was born in Bradford 
county.' Pennsylvania. July 30, 1832. a son 
of Elisha Brownson, whose birth occurred 
in Massachusetts, May 27, 1791. The pa- 
ternal grandfather. Isaac Brownson. was also 
a native of the old Bay state and a soldier 
of the Revolutionary war. being with Wash- 
ington wlien he crossed the Delaware at 
Trenton. When Elisha was eight years old 
the family mo\ed to Sus(|uehanna county. 
Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood, 
and was married. Octol:)er 20. 1823. to Mary 
Titus, who was born December 27,. 1803. 
.\fter his marriage he moved to Bradford 
county. Pennsylvania, where he cleared a 
heavily timbered tract of land and trans- 
formed it into a good farm. There the 
grandfather lived retired until his death. 



348 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



which occurred when our sul^ject was Ijut 
twenty-one years of age. In 1856 the father 
brought liis family to IlHnois and took up 
his residence in Livingston county, where 
he spent the remainder of his hfe, dying- 
June 22. 1874. During the war of 181 2, 
he tried to enhst, but on account of his health 
was not accepted. In politics he was an 
old-line \\'hig. a stanch Abolitionist, and 
later a Republican. His wife died Novem- 
ber 20. 1869. 

Our subject had but a limited opportun- 
ity to acquire an educatidU. not being able 
to attend school more than one year during 
his boyhood, but in later years he devoted 
considerable time to reading and study, and 
in this way obtained a good practical edu- 
cation. During his youth he served a three 
years' apprenticeship to the carjienter's trade 
in New \ ork. only a short distance from his 
liome. and received one hundred and fifty 
dollars for his three years' work, out of 
which he had to clothe himself. In 1854 
he came west 1 m a prospecting tour and 
passed through this county before the rail- 
road was built, and not a house marked the 
present site of Fairbury, while Pontiac was 
a mere hamlet. Being homesick he did not 
remain here long, but spent two years trav- 
ing over the west. Being a good carpenter, 
he could alwa}-s find employment, and spent 
one summer working at his trade in Miss- 
issippi. In this way he saw much of the 
country. In December, 1856, he located in 
this county, which has since been his home. 
One year was spent in Avoca, which was 
then ciuite a thriving little village, while 
Fairbury was unknown, and he was one of 
the few to vote on the township organization. 
On leaving Avoca he took up his residence 
on a farm and in connection with its opera- 
tion worked at his trade in Fairburv, assist- 



ing in the erection of one of the first houses 
of that jjlace. 

In September, 1861, Mr. Brcwnson 
joined the boys in blue, becoming a member 
of Company K, Third Illinois Cavalry, 
which was sent to Springfield to organize 
and from there to Missouri, being with 
Fremont when he made his raid on Spring- 
field, that state. Our subject was with his 
company until they reached Helena, Arkan- 
sas, and was then sent to the hospital. On 
his recnxery he joined the ^lississippi Marine 
Brigade, which was located on the river, 
being in the cavalry department going up 
and down that stream with horses on boats, 
and whenever they discovered any scouts 
landed and chased them. Mr. Brownson 
was mustered out at Vicksburg, August 2Cj. 
1864, with the rank of sergeant. 

After his return north he worked for a 
time at his trade in St. Louis, and then re- 
turned to Fairbury, which had continued to 
be his home. In partnership with liis brother, 
he did an extensix'e business as a contractor 
and builder and gave employment to four- 
teen or fifteen men at one time. He erected 
many of the residences, business blocks and 
other houses of Fairbury, also built the 
Catholic church — the first in the place: the 
Presbyterian church which is still standing; 
and other churches throughout the county. 
Not a man li\ing here has had as much to 
do with the construction of buildings as 
has practically lived retired. His own 
our subject, but for the past year or two he 
pleasant residence was erected the year of 
his marriage. 

On the I ith of March, 1868, Mr. Brown- 
son married Miss Susan Ormsby, of Brad- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
Levi Ormsby, and to them have been born 
two children, both of whom were provided 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



349 



witli «(o(xl educational advantages, .\lice. 
the older, attended school in Dixon, and 
prior to her marriage engaged in leaching in 
Fairhury. She is now the wife of John D. 
Watkins, of Cleveland, Ohio, and they have 
line son, John. Nellie I. was educated at 
the W'esleyan University, at Blooniington. 
and is now a successful teacher in the public 
schools in Fairhury. The family attend the 
Presbyterian church. 

By his ballot Mr. Brownson has always 
supported the Republican party, and in i<SOS 
ser\e<l as assessor of Pleasant Ridge town- 
ship. For nine years he was an active and 
efficient member of the school board of Fair- 
bury, during which time the first brick 
school house was erected there, and was a 
member of the board of village trustees when 
the water works was put in. In Xovember, 
1895. he was appointed to fill a vacancy as 
supervisor, and at the ne.xt election was 
elected to that office. He has since been re- 
elected and is still filling that office in a 
most creditable and satisfactory manner. 
He has taken an important part in the work 
of the Ixiard. and has proved a most com- 
petent and trustworthy official, his duties 
having always been most faithfully dis- 
charged. Fraternally he is a member of 
Aaron Weider Post, G. A. R. : Tarbolton 
Lodge, Xo. 351, F. & A. :M., and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Mutual Aid, in all of 
v.liich he has held office. 



WILLIAM ROBERT :\IORRlS. 

William Robert Morris, a jjrogressive 
member of the agricultural class of Living- 
ston county, is one of the most successful 
young farmers of Amity township. His 



entire life has been spent in this immediate 
1( cality, and here, where he is so well known, 
ht l^ears a reputation for uprightness and 
justice and a conscientious regard for the 
rights of others and his duty as a citizen and 
head of a household. 

William R. Morris, more familiar known 
as Robert Morris, comes from an old and 
honored \'irginia family, and his grand- 
father. Henry Morris, possessed that spirit 
which has filled the hearts of all of the sturdy 
brave pioneers who laid the foundations of 
future civilization and prosperity. Henry 
Morris first removed from the Old Dominion 
to the wilderness of Ohio, subsequently lo- 
cated in Indiana and as early as 1837. when 
this country was new and sparsely settled, 
cauie , to Livingston county. Choosing a 
tract of land in Amity township, he spent the 
remainder of his life here, his death oc- 
curring in 1841. His homestead, which he 
had partially cleared and prepared for culti- 
vation, is the identical one now in the pos- 
session of our subject. 

C. F. Morris, father of William Robert 
Morris, was I)orn in Tippecanoe county, In- 
diana. December 12. 1828, and from his 
tenth year until his death, February 10, 
1900, he dwelt in Amity townshi]) — one of 
her most esteemed citizens. His death is 
felt to be a public loss in this community, 
where so long and faithfully he used his in- 
fluence for its i^ermanent welfare. In early 
manhood he wedded Susanna, daughter of 
Joseph Springer, who was an early settler in 
this locality, also. The ycjung couple com- 
menced keeping house in this township, and 
in the course of time came to live on the old 
Morris homestead, in section 17, having 
bought the interests of the other heirs. Un- 
der his management the place was wonder- 
fully improved, and a well-lKiilt house and 



35° 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



barns added mucli to tlie value and desir- 
ability of the farm. Mr. Morris was en- 
gaged in the actual work of the farm until 
about fifteen years ago, and in 1892 he re- 
moved to Cornell, where he had purchased a 
pleasant residence. His long and useful life 
closed in peacefulness, and. surrounded by 
his loving relatixxs and numerous sincere 
friends he breached his last and passed to his 
reward. His mortal remains were tenderly 
laid away in the old Morris cemetery, on 
the homestead, with which the name has been 
associated for more than three-score years. 
His first wife, the mother of our subject, 
died in 1874, and he afterward married 
again. Joseph C, his eldest son is a resi- 
dent of Kansas City, and Gene\-a, the only 
daughter, is the wife of William Gregory, 
a farmer of this township. 

The birth of William Robert Morris oc- 
curred on the old homestead, May 20, 1868, 
and here his boyhood days were passed in 
tlie usual quiet pursuits of country lads. 
After completing the curriculum of the com- 
mcjn schools, he further qualified himself for 
life's duties b}- attending c(_)llege at Dixon, 
Illinois, where he was a student for two 
years. He then returned home and assidu- 
ously de\-oted himself to the cultivation of 
the farm, deciding t'j make agriculture his 
chief business in the future. Since 1890 
he has had entire charge of the old farm, 
and now manages about four hundred acres 
of well cultivated and highly desirable land. 
He is practical and in sympathy with the 
progressive spirit of the age, and it is safe 
to predict for him wealth and prominence, 
though these things are not his chief aspira- 
tions. 

On the 27th of 2^Iay,, 1887, Ih. Morr.s 
married Ella G. Blake, daughter of Daniel 
Blake, of Cornell, her native place. Se\'en 



children bless the union of this sterling 
couple, namely: Fred, Lena, Robert B., 
Gertrude. Chester Warner, Daniel B. and 
Marv Geneva. 

In his political faith 'Sir. Alorris is a 
Democrat. For himself he has ne\er as- 
pired to public otifice, as he finds his time 
fully occupied in attending to his manifold 
business affairs. Yielding to duty and the 
desires of iiis neighbors, he has officiated as 
district clerk and on the board of education, 
giving his influence to all measures calcu- 
lated to benefit the community permanently 
in his opinion. 



HEXRY J. SAXTELMAN. 

Henry J. Santelman, one of the leading 
agriculturists of Newton township, whose 
home is on section 14, has been a resident of 
Livingston county since 1884. He is a na- 
tive of Illinois, born in La Salle county, De- 
cember 21, 1862, and is a son of Henry and 
Sophia (Freeman) Santelman, natives of 
Germany, who came to this country in early 
life and were married in La Salle county. 
B}- trade the father was a glazier, but here 
he devoted his attention to farming, and 
although he had no capital with which to be- 
gin life, he worked hard and at the time of 
his death, which occurred March 12, 1898, 
he owned two hundred and forty acres of 
valuable land, acquired through his own 
well-directed efforts. He was seventy-three 
years of age at the time of his death. In 
politics he was always a Republican, and 
both he and his wife were, members of the 
German Evangelical church. She is still 
living at the age of sixty years, and makes 
her home in Sunbury township, Livingston 
countv. In their familv were nine chil- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



351 



dren, namely : Charles, who owns and op- 
erates a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Sunbury township; Amelia, wife of Will- 
iam Russow, who has a farm of two hundred 
and eighty acres in Xewtnwn township; 
Henry J., our subject; Mary, wife of Chris- 
tian Cates, of La Salle county; Eretlerick, a 
resident of Sunbury township; William, wlm 
lives on the home place in La Salle county ; 
Edward, who works for his brother Charles; 
Albert, who is with his mother: and Joseph, 
will I is with his brother Charles. 

The subject of this re\ iew received his 
education in the common schools of La 
Salle Count}', and remained at home until 
attaining- his majority. On janu;u-y i, 1SS5, 
he married .Miss Sophia Heckman, who was 
born in (iermany, December 3. i8(),v and 
when se\ cnteen years of age came to Amer- 
ica with her mother and the other children 
of the family, the father haxing ilied pre- 
viously. She has one brother, John, who 
owns and operates a farm in Rock comity, 
Minnesota, and a sister, Mary, wife of 
Charles Santelman. The mother is still liv- 
ing with her cliiklren at the age of se\enty- 
lliree years. ?klr. aiul Mrs. Santelman have 
six children: Hilda, born September 27, 
1885; Ella, September 17, 1889; Walter, 
December 7, 1891 ; Laura, September 7, 
1894; Fred, January J3, 1897; and Roy, 
l-ebruary 12, 1900. 

On starting out in life for himself Mr. 
Santelman's father gave him hve hundred 
dollars, a team and some farming inii)le- 
ments. For nine years he successlullv en- 
gaged in farming in Sunlniry township, ;md 
on selling his property there bought his 
present farm of one hundred and ninety 
acres in Xewtown township, for which he 
paid fifty-eight dollars per acre. This he 
has tiled and further improveil, ami as a 



thorough and practical farmer he is meeting 
with well-deserved success. He possesses 
many of the admirable characteristics of his 
( ierman ancestors, being industrious, ener- 
getic and persevering, and is highly re- 
spected by all who know him. As a Repub- 
lican he takes (juite an active interest in po- 
litical affairs, but has ne\er cared for office, 
though he is ser\ing as school director in 
his district. Religiously he is a member of 
the Evangelical church, as is also his wife. 



IIA.M.MO.M) A. l'l':.\RSO.\. 

Ilamniond A, I'earsoii, a prominent 
farmer of Nebraska township,